Nvidia's GeForce Experience PC game optimizer enters open beta

By on January 24, 2013, 7:00 PM

Nvidia has opened the doors on its GeForce Experience after letting thousands of users hammer on it over the last month. Announced last April and introduced as a closed beta in December, the PC game optimizer aims to help players get the most out of their machines by automatically adjusting in-game settings for their hardware.

When the initiative was first revealed, Nvidia cited a survey that suggested more than 80% of users play PC games in their default configuration, presumably because they're either intimidated by the myriad of quality settings or they simply don't care to invest the time necessary to find a decent configuration for their particular system.

When the closed beta began last month, the GeForce Experience only supported 32 games, and while that number hasn't increased by much, Nvidia has added nine more titles to its database, including Far Cry 3, Mechwarrior Online and Hawken. You'll still need a Fermi or Kepler-based graphics card, though the software now offers limited support for Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad processors, which weren't backed before.

Nvidia says other changes since the closed beta include enhanced game detection logic, support for optimizing games played on 2560x1440 displays, better Chinese, Danish and UK English translations, improved client startup, billboard display, game scan and communication with Nvidia's servers, as well as with various bug fixes. The company previously outlined its six-step game testing process and we'll list that again:

  1. We start with expert game testers that play through key levels of the game (indoors, outdoors, multiplayer etc.) to get a feel for the load and how different settings affect quality and performance.
  2. The game tester identifies an area for automated testing. This area will be from a demanding portion of the game. We don’t always select the absolute worst case since they tend to distort the results.
  3. As part of the game evaluation, the expert game tester will identify an appropriate FPS target. Fast paced games typically require higher FPS. Slower games lower FPS. We also define and test against a minimum FPS to minimize stuttering. The average framerate target is typically between 40-60 FPS, the minimum 25 FPS.
  4. The most difficult part of OPS is deciding which settings to turn on and which to leave off in a performance limited setting. This is done by analyzing each setting and assigning them quality and performance weights. The game tester compares how each setting (eg. shader, texture, shadow) and each quality level (eg. low, medium, high) affects image quality and performance. These are stored as weights which are fed to the automation algorithm.
  5. From here on the testing is automated. The GeForce Experience supercomputer tests the game by turning on settings until the FPS target is reached. This is done in the order of maximum bang for the buck; settings that provide the most visual benefit and least stress on the GPU (eg. texture quality) are turned on first; settings that are performance intensive but visually subtle (eg. 8xAA) are enabled last.
  6. Finally, the GeForce Experience supercomputer goes through and tests thousands of hardware configurations for the given game. Unique settings are generated for each CPU, GPU, and monitor resolution combination.



User Comments: 10

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Littleczr Littleczr said:

When I tried it about 2 months ago it was horrid, but now it seems they have mad improvements. What I like is that it makes it really convenient by consolidating all your game settings in one application.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

Yeah it was very raw. I uninstalled it quicker than I installed it. Trying the new beta now. Seems to be a vast improvement. I Don't think really need it myself but giving it the look-see doesn't do any harm.

Littleczr Littleczr said:

Yeah it was very raw. I uninstalled it quicker than I installed it. Trying the new beta now. Seems to be a vast improvement. I Don't think really need it myself but giving it the look-see doesn't do any harm.

Just tried it with BF3 man was I playing with the completely wrong settings. I have the u2711 and it recommended a new field of view turned off some features but kept me at 2560 by 1440 and I get super fast frame rates is like a new game.

1 person liked this | Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

2560 x 1440? Man! and I thought 640 x 480 was too high for my GTX 690's in SLI

psycros psycros said:

How does the Geforce Experience supercomputer test "thousands of hardware configurations" for games? Emulation? If so, could those results really be trustworthy?

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

How does the Geforce Experience supercomputer test "thousands of hardware configurations" for games? Emulation? If so, could those results really be trustworthy?
I think the game vs application compatibility is determined by all the beta testers, I could be wrong though.

It's my understanding that this application is for those who would not know how to manually set their game-play environment. I take it the application is for setting hardware to a generic configuration based on hardware specs, that would be most suitable to the average person. If I am looking at it correctly, the application only offers recommended settings but yet still allows for tweaking if you are not yet satisfied. But then if you are willing on manually tweaking anyway, why install this application at all?

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

I don't suppose it's for the truly discerning gamer who knows his craft, installs the game then sets about tweaking, adjusting & benchmarking for the next month before he decides to try the 1st chapter of the game only to find he has to fine tune his settings some more which could possibly take a further fortnight. Realistically it's for the 10000's of gamer's who simply install the game & want to play immediately. I kinda like the approach nVidia is taking. It tells me they haven't forsaken pc gaming. If fact they see a future for it Why else would they spend copious amounts of money?

spydercanopus spydercanopus said:

I think most people overestimate their rigs and wind up having choppy or inconsistent performance.

This definitely makes the games run at a solid 60fps, but it disables some cool things you probably bought your graphics card for supporting, like physx and ambient occlusion. Well, at least it does for me on a single gtx480 at 2560x1600 on Batman Arkham City

JC713 JC713 said:

I dont see any use for this

kynham kynham said:

The Nvidia Geforce Experience MY RIG is not correctly detecting my total memory. DXDIAG shows almost 33 Gb of RAM whereas MY RIG only shows 16 Gb. I can't believe everyone is overlooking this fatal error since the Experience suppose to optimize your games.

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