Rent your very own satellite for just $250 a week

By on July 12, 2013, 8:30 AM
education, science, satellite, space, space exploration, ardusat, miniature satellite, nanosatisfi, rent

Space exploration is a field traditionally reserved for established scientists; however, cube satellites designed by California-based NanoSatisfi could change this preconception. Unlike conventional satellites, which have prices ranging from $500 million up to $2 billion, these miniature versions can be developed for considerably less than $1 million.

According to The Verge, the satellite in question is dubbed the ArduSat and is set to launch on August 4th. For just $250 a week, any interested parties can borrow the tiny vessel and explore everything that outer space has to offer. Despite the inexpensive rental costs, the ArduSat appears to be the real deal; it is fitted with multiple cameras, a Geiger counter, a magnetometer, and an ambient light sensor. So how small are we talking? Early reports suggest that the satellite measures just 10 centimeters wide and weighs a mere 2.2 lbs.

The real potential of the ArduSat is that it has opened up the doors of space exploration to everyday people, especially elementary school children and other young scientists.  Individuals now have the ability to inexpensively track meteorites, map the earth’s magnetic field, and take photos detailing both the spectrum of the sun as well as the eye of a hurricane. The possibilities are endless.

Peter Platzer, the CEO of NanoSatisfi, added, “Instead of huge, expensive machines, each of which is different, we have smaller, cheaper craft built on a single standard that allows anyone to create improvements for them. We’re taking Moore’s law, and we’re moving it into space.”

Currently, education is the company’s main priority. NanoSatisfi has already enlisted ten schools for the pilot program, and has formed a partnership with NASA to optimize its research and educational outreach. The company has also received  upwards of $100,000 through its initial Kickstarter campaign, as well as $1.2 million from external investors.

For those interested, here is a quick video detailing the ArduSat project.




User Comments: 12

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1 person liked this | cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Just great!! Another personal reason to trash orbit some more. Cleanup the crap already in orbit before you trash it even worse. No wait, I've got a better idea, keep the sh-t in your backyard.

Guest said:

I like this idea mainly because it puts some trash in earths orbit that we cant leave the planet..the outer planets or now safe from the virus called humanity.

1 person liked this | Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

What about clearing away all the other junk floating in earths orbit that no longer functions before chucking any more stuff up there or will we only worry about that when it's too late...

JC713 JC713 said:

This is cool but as the others said, there is already too much trash up in space.

TrueBooleanFals TrueBooleanFals said:

Not enough garbage in space... it's huge, throw everything in space!!!! EVERYTHING!!!

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

throw everything in space!!!! EVERYTHING!!!

No need in that, I see plenty of room right here.

Guest said:

All orbiting payloads should be required to self destruct within 10 years of launch.

Junk problem solved, or at least maintained.

Guest said:

"All orbiting payloads should be required to self destruct within 10 years of launch. Junk problem solved, or at least maintained."

..when all orbiting payloads self destruct into pieces--> what left from them still scatters in the space.. how can you tell the problem solved?

1 person liked this | PinothyJ said:

"All orbiting payloads should be required to self destruct within 10 years of launch. Junk problem solved, or at least maintained."

..when all orbiting payloads self destruct into pieces--> what left from them still scatters in the space.. how can you tell the problem solved?

Small space junk is far more dangerous than big space junk ?

Khanonate said:

"All orbiting payloads should be required to self destruct within 10 years of launch. Junk problem solved, or at least maintained."

..when all orbiting payloads self destruct into pieces--> what left from them still scatters in the space.. how can you tell the problem solved?

Small space junk is far more dangerous than big space junk ?

It doesn't matter if its big or small, all space junk are dangerous.

Khanonate said:

I don't know how it did that... I typed "It doesn't matter if its big or small, all space junk are dangerous".

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

It doesn't matter if its big or small, all space junk are dangerous.
Yeah but the small crap would be more difficult to see and navigate around. It would be abit like walking around a bolder while trying not to step on the pea gravel around it.

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