All Samsung TVs have a remote kill switch to disable stolen sets, and the company just...

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,699   +1,774
That's not what the OnStar's website says regarding the technology ( https://www.onstar.com/us/en/articles/tips/stolen-vehicle-assistance-helps-stop-thieves/ ) but okay, I've never had OnStar before so I can't say for certain from personal experience on how it works. The point I'm making about the Onstar example is that OnStar is a paid service that is provided to a client, vs a locking mechanism that, as far as I am aware of, has never been made public and has only been used to protect Samsung's interests as the displays had not been sold yet, and not for any consumer registered displays that had been unlawfully taken. It is a fantastic middle finger to those who had stolen the displays for their own use, but I feel kinda bad for those that get unknowingly swindled when the TV they just bought from someone gets bricked when they connect it to the internet for the first time.

I don't think what I've said really amounts to fearmongering, just a pessimistic view of what possibility could happen, however unlikely it may be. If dismissing it tailors to your common sense, then more power to you. If anything the news of this won't stop me from purchasing Samsung products/TVs. I kind of just assume anything that connects to the internet has a backdoor whether we know it or not, and it's just a matter of whether I care enough (usually not) to manage what they can and can't talk to, and whether that kind of access is a known commodity.


Very true. I just hope they take network security and access control much more seriously than the dozens of other examples over the last few years. We already know IoT are practically a ticking timebomb, despite all the cool things you can do with them. XD
It's what the news station covering the chases LIVE say. No website needed.

Making a stolen product useless is still beyond some people. I can't fix that.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,800   +2,154
TechSpot Elite
How are you writing this post?
A computer isn't considered to be a "smart" device because it doesn't have a mind of its own with hard-wired firmware that can be made to do anything. A computer only does what you tell it to while a smart TV or smartphone do what you tell it to and what their makers tell them to do. They're more autonomous than PCs are.
 

Alfatawi Mendel

Posts: 147   +233
IMO, Samsung would face a torrent of negative publicity on forums like this or AVSForums by requiring an internet connection to complete the basic setup, and that they would be trying to mitigate this stolen TV problem would not quell that negative publicity.
Well, that hasn't stopped them loading their VERY expensive smartphones with bloat that is impossible to remove. When I pay $1000+ dollars for a device, I sure as hell want the ability to remove spam apps and ad laden rubbish. So, no Samsung internet connected stuff for me.
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 560   +446
A computer isn't considered to be a "smart" device because it doesn't have a mind of its own with hard-wired firmware that can be made to do anything. A computer only does what you tell it to while a smart TV or smartphone do what you tell it to and what their makers tell them to do. They're more autonomous than PCs are.
Really?

Tell your Windows PC to stop sending every last bit of telemetry to Microsoft when you are using the Internet

This, I gotta see!
LoL
 

bandit8623

Posts: 339   +187
How are you writing this post?
a laptop or pc is not a considered a smart device. a phone or tv sure. at least phones have a full fledged os that has a decent firewall and operating system is updated with security updates. tvs dont get updates after a year or so.
 

bandit8623

Posts: 339   +187
Really?

Tell your Windows PC to stop sending every last bit of telemetry to Microsoft when you are using the Internet

This, I gotta see!
LoL
just because stuff is being sent to microsoft doesnt mean its insecure. security updates every month are whats important so outside entities cant get your info. ad tracking ? not a concern for most.
 

p51d007

Posts: 2,850   +2,210
As long as there are "dumb" tv's, that's all I buy. I don't need the damn internet connected to
THE BOOB TUBE. It won't make what's on tv any "smarter".
 

ScottSoapbox

Posts: 118   +188
Am I correctly assuming the logic here is to keep stealing them - just don't use their main function?

Why isn't it, don't steal tv's?
Main function? Isn't that displaying images?

If you mean streaming, just use a streaming box/stick. Or do what I do and don't let your TV phone home wirh pi-hole.

Seriously though, Android TVs try to contact Google constantly. My Sony tries once a SECOND. It's insane.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,699   +1,774
Main function? Isn't that displaying images?

If you mean streaming, just use a streaming box/stick. Or do what I do and don't let your TV phone home wirh pi-hole.

Seriously though, Android TVs try to contact Google constantly. My Sony tries once a SECOND. It's insane.
Google what the main function of a smart tv is and paste it here. I'll wait.
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 560   +446
just because stuff is being sent to microsoft doesnt mean its insecure.
Yes it does!
That's exactly what it means

A Zero Trust security policy spells it out quite clearly

Zero Trust means you are not to blindly trust a backdoor'd / closed source spyware platform created by a money grubbing Corporate Monopoly

Zero Trust means TRUST NO-ONE!

If you are trusting your security to complete strangers who keep promising miracles, you do not have security and never will

Just hand your money over to an Indian Call Center
They have better service than Microsoft
You can even talk to a real person
 

bandit8623

Posts: 339   +187
Yes it does!
That's exactly what it means

A Zero Trust security policy spells it out quite clearly

Zero Trust means you are not to blindly trust a backdoor'd / closed source spyware platform created by a money grubbing Corporate Monopoly

Zero Trust means TRUST NO-ONE!

If you are trusting your security to complete strangers who keep promising miracles, you do not have security and never will

Just hand your money over to an Indian Call Center
They have better service than Microsoft
You can even talk to a real person
could it be insecure? sure . but not likely as how many people use windows 10? if it was a widespread prob we would have an outcry. microsoft grabbing my usage telemetrics vs tmobile getting hacked and giving out ss numbers and sim data now thats insecure
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 560   +446
could it be insecure? sure . but not likely

Dude, what is your major malfunction?

Backdoors "ARE" insecure by design
Spyware Platforms "ARE" insecure by design
Closed Source software created by a money grubbing Monopoly "IS" insecurity by design

At Microsoft, Insecurity is not a bug, it's a feature!
 

Thunder6230

Posts: 66   +40
If they know where the signal is coming from why don’t they just hire a hit squad to go to that location and exterminate the criminal? THAT would make for some great TV….”Samsung Assasin Squad” on Fox.

To disable costs nothing but to hire a squad costs all over the world.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 546   +394
A good firewall would protect against random connections from outside the owner's local network. First, the hacker has to find their way through that firewall - if that is even possible in the case of a well-designed firewall. That, though, depends on the device owner having a reasonable degree of technical knowledge about how to protect their network and the devices on it.

Personally, I am not all that concerned for my network with respect to the threat of such an attack. My firewall just does not respond to any "ping" requests, and will not allow connections to it that are not related to an outgoing connection. Nor do I have any ports open for anything. Lastly, I tend not to have "smart" devices connected to the internet. IMO, "bad actors" are not that hard to deal with when someone has a good firewall between their local network and the internet.

But, for the non-technical user, I can see instances where this might be a problem if they don't have a good firewall device that is properly configured by default.

Well, that's all fine if you port 80 is also blocked. Since it's not, Samsung, or hackers can access your TV.
 
Yeah right... Since I am from SA I can already tell u that Samsung will be lucky to find a quarter of those tv's. That week of riot cost us close to R50 Bil .. which is around $3 bil... Somehow , someone will find a way to bypass this lock.