AMD Epyc Genoa series leaks: introducing 96-core and 84-core CPUs

mongeese

Posts: 613   +122
Staff member
In context: Late last year, AMD announced the fourth-gen Epyc series, codenamed Genoa. It's now escaped from AMD's labs and is passing through the hands of leakers before it can make its way onto the open market in the coming months.

According to AMD CEO Lisa Su's keynote last year, Genoa processors should have up to 96 cores based on the Zen 4 architecture and use the TSMC 5nm node. They're supposed to have twice the density and power efficiency of their preceding series, Milan, and 25% more performance overall.

Yuuki Ans, a prolific leaker in the high-performance compute sector, has revealed a spreadsheet containing some of the specs of eighteen models. His leaks seem to come from AMD's partners and are usually good, but the finer details, like clock speeds and TDPs, aren't final yet and could change.

Some processors are only referred to as engineering samples, abbreviated as ES in the tables below. In cases where P and non-P models have identical specs, the two versions are condensed into one row.

8-12 chiplets

Model Cores / Threads Base Clock Speed TDP L3 Cache
Epyc 9654P 96 / 192 2.00 - 2.15 GHz 360W 384 MB
ES 96 / 192 2.00 - 2.15 GHz 320 - 400W 384 MB
ES 84 / 168 2.00 GHz 290W 384 MB
Epyc 9534 64 / 128 2.30 - 2.40 GHz 280W 256 MB
ES 64 / 128 2.50 - 2.65 GHz 320 - 400W 256 MB

As you'd expect, higher core counts are met with higher TDPs and lower base clocks. In this bracket, Genoa has similar base clocks to Milan but higher TDPs, even for the 64-core models.

4-6 chiplets

Model Cores / Threads Base Clock Speed TDP L3 Cache
Epyc 9454(P) 48 / 96 2.25 - 2.35 GHz 290W 256 MB
ES 48 / 96 3.20 - 3.40 GHz 360W 256 MB
Epyc 9354(P) 32 / 64 2.75 - 2.85 GHz 280W 256 MB
ES 32 / 64 3.20 - 3.40 GHz 320W 256 MB
ES 32 / 64 2.70 - 2.85 GHz 260W 256 MB
Epyc 9334 32 / 64 2.30 - 2.50 GHz 210W 128 MB

Genoa's mid-tier models are clocked far above Milan's, but they also have higher TDPs. Whereas Milan's 48-core and 32-core models were capped at 280W, Genoa's blast past that and exceed 300W.

2-3 chiplets

Model Cores / Threads Base Clock Speed TDP L3 Cache
Epyc 9274F 24 / 48 3.40 - 3.60 GHz 320W 256 MB
Epyc 9254 24 / 48 2.40 - 2.50 GHz 200W 128 MB
Epyc 9224 24 / 48 2.15 - 2.25 GHz 200W 64 MB
Epyc 9174F 16 / 32 3.60 - 3.80 GHz 320W 256 MB
Epyc 9124 16 / 32 2.60 - 2.70 GHz 200W 64 MB

Genoa presents some good options at this level, like 24-core and 16-core models equipped with 256 MB cache and base clocks reaching 3.5 GHz. However, they continue the trend of consuming more power than their predecessors. For comparison, Milan's 64-core models had TDPs below 300W, but Genoa's 16-core models reach the 320W threshold.

To power them, Genoa has a new socket called SP5. It can handle up to 700W and will also support Genoa's counterpart for the cloud, Bergamo. Additionally, it supports new features, including 12-channel DDR5 and PCIe 5.0.

Genoa is scheduled for this year and could arrive soon. Bergamo should arrive in the first half of next year.

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Puiu

Posts: 5,747   +4,683
TechSpot Elite
The increased TDP might just be a result of market demand. It's what sells and what data centers want (and can handle). Considering the fact that these CPUs can be configured to run at a lower TDP for just a small drop in clock speed, I don't think it will be a problem.
 

zamroni111

Posts: 367   +215
The increased TDP might just be a result of market demand. It's what sells and what data centers want (and can handle). Considering the fact that these CPUs can be configured to run at a lower TDP for just a small drop in clock speed, I don't think it will be a problem.
700w for 96 cores is very efficient.
Definitely much more efficient than what Intel can offer
 

Mr Majestyk

Posts: 1,354   +1,237
128 core Bergamo next year, but the real nail in Intel's coffin is Zen 5's Epyc Turin cpu's that will hit 256 cores with Zen 6 Epyc possibly hitting 512 cores. I shudder to think of the TDP though.
 

ypsylon

Posts: 525   +544
Well 320W TDP is rather excellent with such humongous cache sizes. It's quite remarkable progressive scaling compared to previous generations.

If AMD decides to go with Threadripper (in whatever form), then I sincerely hope they'll start with 16 cores model. I guess AMD will target same 320W power envelope for TR because of bump on the clocks to 3.8-4GHz.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,747   +4,683
TechSpot Elite
128 core Bergamo next year, but the real nail in Intel's coffin is Zen 5's Epyc Turin cpu's that will hit 256 cores with Zen 6 Epyc possibly hitting 512 cores. I shudder to think of the TDP though.
128 full cores with Zen4c will be incredible MT performance even though ST will suffer. I really want to see some benchmarks for it.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,961   +7,006
Well 320W TDP is rather excellent with such humongous cache sizes. It's quite remarkable progressive scaling compared to previous generations.

If AMD decides to go with Threadripper (in whatever form), then I sincerely hope they'll start with 16 cores model. I guess AMD will target same 320W power envelope for TR because of bump on the clocks to 3.8-4GHz.
My guess is that a 16-core TR will be unlikely as that will compete with their Ryzen line, and they backed away from doing that in the last generation already.
 

zamroni111

Posts: 367   +215
Well 320W TDP is rather excellent with such humongous cache sizes. It's quite remarkable progressive scaling compared to previous generations.

If AMD decides to go with Threadripper (in whatever form), then I sincerely hope they'll start with 16 cores model. I guess AMD will target same 320W power envelope for TR because of bump on the clocks to 3.8-4GHz.
You can use epyc for workstation too.
Super micro atx motherboard for epyc is just 700 dollars
 

zamroni111

Posts: 367   +215
128 full cores with Zen4c will be incredible MT performance even though ST will suffer. I really want to see some benchmarks for it.
Even if single thread performance is still behind Intel, multi thread performance actually matters most for server.

In benchmarks tool's single thread test, only 1 core is busy while other cores are almost idle so the resources are effectively usable by single core.

This situation will never happen in real production servers during peak traffic and we do sizing based on peak traffic.
 

yesnt

Posts: 6   +2
My guess is that a 16-core TR will be unlikely as that will compete with their Ryzen line, and they backed away from doing that in the last generation already.
Some use cases need tons of memory and more PCIe than Ryzen can deliver. I don't see 16 core TR really competing with Ryzen.