An old TV knocked out an entire village's broadband for 18 months

CrisisDog

Posts: 187   +82
How does one receive a signal on such an old device? OTA uses new frequencies for HD. Or was this thing still analog cable as well? Which, really, who still uses analog except for vinyl?
 

cliffordcooley

Posts: 12,496   +5,870
Regardless it is a very good reason not to use old electronics.

This article makes me question our old microwave. The thing is only 30+ years old. I have no idea how well shielded it is.
Similar to this one
maxresdefault[1].jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: PanGrns

eforce

Posts: 72   +58
It shouldn't affect 2.4Ghz devices at all, might want to get that replaced as you might be absorbing radiation as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PanGrns

scavengerspc

Posts: 591   +454
TechSpot Elite
It shouldn't affect 2.4Ghz devices at all, might want to get that replaced as you might be absorbing radiation as well.
What made it even more confusing is that it passed the cell phone test so I don't really know why it does it. My router is just a few feet from it but when I move it to 4 ft. or more then it doesn't happen.
 

arrowflash

Posts: 201   +169
How does one receive a signal on such an old device? OTA uses new frequencies for HD. Or was this thing still analog cable as well? Which, really, who still uses analog except for vinyl?
Maybe they used one of those OTA HD digital-to-analog converter boxes for old TVs, never heard of those?
 

orbital

Posts: 9   +7
That's not entirely accurate. You need a licence to watch TV as it's being broadcast and to use the BBC iPlayer catch up service, but you don't need a licence to own a TV or to use it any purpose other than those I've just mentioned. It's still not particularly good value though.
I think some time ago they made it that you pay TV licencing fee no matter what, like if you have any type of electronic device (smartphone, tablet etc.) that could be used for any type of streaming content including YouTube. Otherwise it was designed to pay for the BBC but from what I read their extended ToS made it applicable that unless you do not have any type of device capable of watching media content, or you are exempt, you must pay for TV licence.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Underdog
I think some time ago they made it that you pay TV licencing fee no matter what, like if you have any type of electronic device (smartphone, tablet etc.) that could be used for any type of streaming content including YouTube. Otherwise it was designed to pay for the BBC but from what I read their extended ToS made it applicable that unless you do not have any type of device capable of watching media content, or you are exempt, you must pay for TV licence.
You do need a TV licence to watch broadcast TV or BBC iPlayer on any type of device, but you don't need a licence just to own the device or use it to watch YouTube etc. The way the rules are worded is not very helpful and clearly designed to worry people into buying a licence even if they don't really need one.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TempleOrion
In the UK, you have to have a license for a TV set. They used to have a van that drove around detecting sets at addresses that had not paid the tax. So, he may have not paid tax on his old TV, or they may have revoked his license. If so, he IS obligated not to use his TV set. Ever.
Those TV Detector Vans were utter b*llox and actually never worked. They were just a deterrent to scare anyone without TV License to get one. #DefudTheBBC
 

CBTex

Posts: 92   +149
In the UK, you have to have a license for a TV set. They used to have a van that drove around detecting sets at addresses that had not paid the tax. So, he may have not paid tax on his old TV, or they may have revoked his license. If so, he IS obligated not to use his TV set. Ever.
You need a license to view information on radio waves someone else is pumping into your home whether you like it our not? Wow. That's nuts.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BadThad

Uncle Al

Posts: 7,500   +6,001
All right, all right, all right ...... just give the poor bloke a transistor radio with no batteries .... that will end the interference ...... LOL
 

pmshah

Posts: 135   +17
In the UK, you have to have a license for a TV set. They used to have a van that drove around detecting sets at addresses that had not paid the tax. So, he may have not paid tax on his old TV, or they may have revoked his license. If so, he IS obligated not to use his TV set. Ever.
Do they still have to if they are not capturing any "over the air" signals? I remember we in India too had to pay the licence fees radios and TVs but in turn there were ZERO commercials or ads.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TempleOrion

OortCloud

Posts: 440   +280
in fact a good lawyer could make the case that the internet provider had failed to design a product that would be protected from such interference ....
Americans - straight to the lawyers! Maybe the rest of the village should sue the old couple for the loss? If they played their cards right they could get them evicted and a nice little windfall from the sale of their modest cottage... ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: alchemist83

Ben Myers

Posts: 107   +36
United Kingdom not US so laws may be different, here in the US we have an FCC certification that devices are tested to not cause interference.
Tell me how good FCC cerification is when I drive down the road listening to an AM radio station, and broadcast gets drowned out by massive static. Say what? Can't hear you!
 

alchemist83

Posts: 49   +13
Uncle Al said:

You would think that at least they might provide that poor fellow with a more modern TV in exchange for the old one .... after all, he wasn't legally bound to not use his TV if it was legally purchased .... in fact a good lawyer could make the case that the internet provider had failed to design a product that would be protected from such interference ....

Lmao!
No. Just no.
LMAO! Er Yes. Just Yes. Just plain definitely a hard yes! And YES. The ISP are 100% responsible to protect their devices from interference.
 

Rayneofpayne

Posts: 237   +228
Tell me how good FCC cerification is when I drive down the road listening to an AM radio station, and broadcast gets drowned out by massive static. Say what? Can't hear you!
That is the certification, it doesn't cause interference and can receive it. Perhaps read those little labels they stick on everything as that is working as intended.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,358   +1,470
Staff member
Do they still have to if they are not capturing any "over the air" signals?
It doesn't matter how the TV channels are broadcasted - it's a question of whether or not it's live. So watching any TV channel or listening to any radio broadcast, regardless of the device or means of transmission, requires a licence.

If it's not live, then you don't need one - the sole exception being the BBC's online on-demand service.
 

pmshah

Posts: 135   +17
Tell me how good FCC cerification is when I drive down the road listening to an AM radio station, and broadcast gets drowned out by massive static. Say what? Can't hear you!
I believe Germans are the strictest in this regard. In fact you can be penalised if you use certain specified equipment during certain hours of the day too.