Apple finds 90% of its accessories sold on Amazon are fake; sues main manufacturer

jobeard

TS Ambassador
Common stuff with simple specs is one thing, but I never buy non-Apple chargers as others have been known to literally FRY the device they are charging. Penny wise and Dollar foolish - - allowing a $1.95 charger to destroy an expensive iPad or iPhone.
 

hood6558

TS Evangelist
Not entirely. Every time I've seen a tear down of a Apple charger or cable, I've always been impressed with the parts list. They're using capacitors and resistors with low deviation values, from good companies, and the circuit layouts are clean and thoughtful.

I don't have any Apple products, I have no interest in buying any Apple products, but I do respect solid electrical engineering when I see it.
I guess you don't like paying 4 times as much for that "solid Electrical engineering". Good engineering isn't about throwing money at a product, it's more about designing it to do it's job without overkill and waste.
 

mbrowne5061

TS Evangelist
I guess you don't like paying 4 times as much for that "solid Electrical engineering". Good engineering isn't about throwing money at a product, it's more about designing it to do it's job without overkill and waste.
No, I don't like over-paying. Which is why I buy other well-design products from other companies. Sticking to chargers, Anker is another company that doesn't skimp on design, components, or QC & QA. They are hardly the 'bargain basement' chargers that are the target of this article, but are still much cheaper than Apple.

By my own estimation, about 25% of Apple's pricing is marketing, 25% for the "privilege" and aesthetic, and the remaining 50% is engineering costs and ensuring a profit is turned on just those cost. From a pure hardware perspective, I respect them. But, because I know what I am looking at, I also know I can buy comparable hardware from other companies for much less.
 

jobeard

TS Ambassador
We all have reasons why we select one product over another, and price is frequently a primary discriminator.

While many enjoy building and modifying their PC, I've had my hardware days when in high school with etching my own pc-boards, fm/am radios and mobile transmitters.

Reliability and Security are my hot buttons, so I don't root my cellphone. With all the variations that have been derived from Google for the Android and the subsequent ease of hacking these devices, it's no surprise that would opt for well managed platform where there are coding standards and requirements that must be met to allow Apps to arrive on the Apple Store.

So yes, I (willingly) pay extra to obtain better Reliability and Security.
 
I think the bigger problem for Amazon is that it comingles inventory. If a company sells a product that it says is a real apple product and looks like it then Amazon groups it all together with the real product. No such thing exists on ebay.
Amazon also commingles user reviews/ratings for completely different products in the same/similar product line. A lot of Amazon policies make zero sense.
 
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funglebuddy

TS Enthusiast
Honestly with my Apple stuff I just bite the bullet and go to the apple store and pay the premium...is it worth the price they charge? No but it beats getting a good deal on a cable/charger and getting screwed in the long run. Only one I have been happy with is Anker.
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
Amazon also commingles user reviews/ratings for completely different products in the same/similar product line. A lot of Amazon policies make zero sense.
In case you haven't noticed, so does Newegg. They do announce it in the review header sic: "Related Product". It's particularly prevalent, (and possibly limited to), the hard and solid state drive sections.However, they don't commingle brands, or even lines, from the same manufacturer, a least I've never seen it.

As an example, you're not going to see an enterprise or surveillance drive review mixed with a cheapish desktop drive line..
 

brucek

TS Guru
I get that it is possible to make a counterfeit product. What I don't get is how Amazon doesn't know who they got their merchandise from. If Amazon's page says "Sold by Amazon, product by Apple", isn't it reasonable to believe that means Amazon took delivery from Apple?

Or if that's not the case, and Amazon is buying from someone who is not Apple, and not an authorized distributor for Apple, all while saying the product is from Apple, isn't Amazon effectively just as guilty for the fraud?
 

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