Automakers and smartphone manufacturers collaborate on Digital Key standard to eliminate...

Greg S

TS Evangelist

It is already possible to unlock and drive off with certain vehicle models using a smartphone, but only a select few cars support completely keyless operation. Until now, there has been no standardization in the automotive industry for going completely digital. The Digital Key 1.0 standard sets the criteria for virtual keys that can be used in place of physical keys.

One of the major concerns for digital keys is security. Nobody wants to accidentally install a malicious app on their phone and later find out their car was stolen or broken into as a result. To prevent many remote attacks from happening, the standard is based around close-range NFC. This requires an end user to by physically near a vehicle with the correct unlocking credentials.

Additionally, the owner of a vehicle will be able to immediately revoke access to digital keys. Not only is sharing of cars made easier by securely sharing virtual keys, there is no longer any hassle associated with returning keys. Rental cars and car sharing businesses can greatly benefit from not having to hand out original physical keys to their fleet.

As part of the security options available, digital keys can have programmable properties associated with them. Many existing vehicles already have smart keys for push-button start that allow limitations to be enforced on a per-key basis. Limiting maximum speed, audio volume, setting seat positioning, driving modes, and just about any other setting that manufacturers can dream up could be set or restricted depending on which key you are using.

Digital keys are clearly still a few years away from implementation, but there are several major automakers on board that could lead to widespread use. BMW, Honda, General Motors, Hyundai, Mercedes, Toyota, and Volkswagen have all expressed interest in using the standard. Samsung, LG, and Apple are looking to support Digital Key on their respective mobile devices.

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p51d007

TS Evangelist
Nope...I PREFER an old fashion key.
Digital can be hacked. Yes, you can rip the console off, yank the key thingy out and stick a screw driver
in and start the car. But, if you hack the electronic key, the vehicle "won't look" like it has been tampered
with.
Too easy now, to just jack a car with the electronic stuff. Over complicating something that doesn't need to be screwed with. Just because you can do something, doesn't mean it really needs to be done.
I'll stick with the old fashion key thank you. At least, PLEASE leave us the option.
 

Cycloid Torus

Stone age computing - click on the rock below..
No key? Replace it with a 'convenient' keyless entry device. What if the battery on my keyless entry device goes flat... do I call AAA or computer repair? I sense a solution which may become the problem.
 

ShagnWagn

TS Evangelist
Push button start is a TERRIBLE idea, not to mention keyless. Ask any mechanic. Brand new vehicles often have to be TOWED in just because a key doesn't work. Laughable. Unfortunately my new car has push button start. :( I have been unable to start it because the remote key has issues. Thank goodness the four times it's happened it was in my driveway where I could just jump in another vehicle.

A physical key will never have digital issues. And nothing digital has ever been hacked...
 
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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
BIG mistake .... the physical security should remain the standard with everything else as an "option" including the ability to turn it completely off.
 
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D

davislane1

Nope...I PREFER an old fashion key.
Digital can be hacked. Yes, you can rip the console off, yank the key thingy out and stick a screw driver
in and start the car. But, if you hack the electronic key, the vehicle "won't look" like it has been tampered
with.
Too easy now, to just jack a car with the electronic stuff. Over complicating something that doesn't need to be screwed with. Just because you can do something, doesn't mean it really needs to be done.
I'll stick with the old fashion key thank you. At least, PLEASE leave us the option.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szbZwjmu0H0
 

grinninglibber

TS Rookie
No key? Replace it with a 'convenient' keyless entry device. What if the battery on my keyless entry device goes flat... do I call AAA or computer repair? I sense a solution which may become the problem.
The keyless device for my car has no battery. And if they car battery dies there is a key inside my "keyless device" which I have never used.

Now if my car fob could open up my house
 
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