Comcast is rolling out 2Gbps Internet service in select states

Endymio

Posts: 1,838   +1,909
We are specifically talking about gpon.
No we're not. Comcast is rolling this out as part of their 10G infrastructure, which is predicated on DOCSIS 4.0. It supports hybrid fiber/coax networks as well as XGS-PON ftth .... but not GPON.
 

bandit8623

Posts: 442   +242
You do realize that xgpon is symmetrical 10g


xg pon is a type of gpon. just diff speeds and waves
 
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Endymio

Posts: 1,838   +1,909
buhahah xg pon is a type of gpon. you are splitting hairs. would suck to have to have a converstion with you at your house.
Sigh, you missed the point entirely. Comcast's 10G does not require PON at all -- in fact it's primarily designed for) hybrid fiber/coax buildouts:

" In the first lab deployment of the technology earlier this year, Comcast achieved a symmetrical 4 Gbps speed. Knittle claims that DOSIS 4.0 can outperform the XGS-PON we’re now seeing deployed. He claims [it] will be able to produce a true 10-gigabit output while the XGS-PON actual output is closer to 8.7 Gbps downstream."


As for your premise that XGS-PON is "just a type of GPON", most industry analysts would call that a stretch too:

"The move to 10G FTTH from GPON is a natural evolution...The technologies being used in support of 10G fiber connections include XGS-PON..."

 

bandit8623

Posts: 442   +242
Go back and look at my conversation with tparky. we were talking about gpon and docsis. you decided to come in and say we were not talking about gpon. stop butting in.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,838   +1,909
Go back and look at my conversation with tparky. we were talking about gpon
His original question was whether a provider could "power up another laser at a different wavelength to add more capacity" - which is WDM. Which Comcast's 10G supports -- and GPON in general supports as well. It is, in fact, the entire reason XG-PON runs at different wavelengths.

stop butting in.
If you wish a private conversation, you might wish to move to a private forum.
 

trparky

Posts: 1,146   +1,305
So, the answer to my initial question of...
Is there a way for them to power up another laser at a different wavelength to add more capacity to the link?
Is yes. It's just not something that's normally done. However, it's technically feasible.

Good, that means that there's room to grow without having to deploy new stuff in the field which is awfully expensive.
 

trparky

Posts: 1,146   +1,305
You still need to deploy new equipment at the endpoints. You just don't need to run new fiber.
So, in the case of my setup, they'd need to replace the fiber SFP module that's sticking out the backside of my router. My fiber goes all the way from the poll, into my house, and right up to the wall which terminates at a connector and from that point there's a flexible fiber "wire" that goes from the wall to the SFP.

Theoretically speaking, they could just ship everyone out a new one and instruct people how to do it. Or, if the person isn't comfortable, offer a tech visit for a nominal fee.
 

someOtherGuy

Posts: 53   +32
That's my point why do it 80% now then have to spend more money later doing the other 20% your competitors on fiber will not be waiting for you they can crank up the speeds faster on fiber than you will be able to on even docsis 4.0

I know fiber is the bomb I was a cable user for about 15 years and now fiber for almost 4 there is no comparison when its comes to speed, latency and how stable the connection is.

Which competitors? In my area that would be AT&T, with twisted pair rocking a solid 100/20; or you could use another type of Internet, like mobile (5G) or satellite (Starlink & Co.). When you're the leader there's very little incentive to "improve further". With a limited investment and this new tech, they're basically de-facto leaders for the foreseeable future and very close to FTTH. They'll cover that last mile (the 20%) when a real competitor breaks ground: AT&T Fiber, Verizon Fiber, Google Fiber... but probably not before that.