Contract for the Web: Tim Berners-Lee launches plan to fix the web

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

Berners-Lee says the worst aspects of the web threaten to bring about a digital dystopia, which has led to the launch of the “Contract for the Web.” Created by over 80 organizations, representing governments, companies, and civil society, the scheme requires commitments to keep the web open, safe, and free.

The contract is split into nine central principles, which are divided into three each for governments, companies, and citizens.

Governments are called on to ensure everyone can connect to the internet, keep all of the internet available permanently, and respect and protect people’s online privacy and data rights.

Companies’ principles include making the internet affordable and accessible, respecting and protecting users’ privacy and personal data, and developing tech that “support the best in humanity and challenge the worst.”

Last is the Citizens’ principles. These ask individuals to create content that makes the web a valuable place, build strong online communities, and fight to keep the web an open place.

"The power of the web to transform people's lives, enrich society and reduce inequality is one of the defining opportunities of our time," said Berners-Lee. "But if we don't act now, and act together, to prevent the web being misused by those who want to exploit, divide and undermine, we are at risk of squandering that potential."

"The Contract for the Web gives us a roadmap to build a better web. But it will not happen unless we all commit to the challenge."

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Squid Surprise

TS Evangelist
"Companies’ principles include making the internet affordable and accessible, respecting and protecting users’ privacy and personal data, and developing tech that “support the best in humanity and challenge the worst.”

Yet MS, Google and Facebook are members of this? I wonder if they will really be "removed from the list of endorsers should they fail to show they are implementing the principles laid out."

I'll believe it when I see it...
 

Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Now that the major players are MUCH bigger and stronger I have severe doubts about this. It's just another desperate attempt to tell the world to leave the web alone and let the big boys do what they want. The only way it will stop is for the US and other major players to do what the EU has done and execute some serious crack downs that include stronger monitory fines and JAIL TIME for those that refuse to comply .... Zuck would be a very good starting point.

By the way, what happened to Al Gore? After all he claims that HE invented the internet ...... no?
 
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Ravalo

TS Addict
“Last is the Citizens’ principles. These ask individuals to create content that makes the web a valuable place, build strong online communities, and fight to keep the web an open place”

Basically, do what we’ve been doing in the past 20 years
 

MilwaukeeMike

TS Evangelist
Where's the Citizens' principal for cruising social media, and buying stuff? Lol, who really spends time online 'creating strong communities that respect people? '

This guy is really out of touch.
 

Wizwill

TS Booster
Amen!

First:
Make ALL private data use 'Opt-In" and require current stored data to be 'wiped" if requested. This to apply to both corporations and , most especially, to governments.

Second
: Require all commercial websites to list a working email address and/or phone number to contact to request this with email compliance receipt required and meaningful fine for non-compliance, say $250,000 USD per offense TO THE AFFECTED PARTY!

I can add quite a few more concrete suggestions but these would be a great start.

include smartphone and LTE web and ban click-bait fake sites, fake employment spam and robo calls with equally high fines to OFFENDED PARTIES.

 
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Yynxs

TS Maniac
Amen!
First:
Make ALL private data use 'Opt-In" and require current stored data to be 'wiped" if requested. This to apply to both corporations and , most especially, to governments.
I disagree about governments. The government has a responsibility about it's citizens to insure services are provided but the responsibility is not defined well enough right now. In an ideal world, the data the government requires you to provide should not be releasable outside the government and controlled internally by law. (as you know from the present FISA abuse stories on Trump supporters and Obama's Attorney Generals and IRS commissars, the courts are no longer a protection)

All data collection, including machine, IP, movement inside website, etc., not retainable past 24 hours and not shareable with anyone or "partners". If you can't figure out which page of you website was visited, you don't really need to know any other facts about visitors, let alone retain them and eliminates the "doubleclick factor" of machine linking other data to violate privacy.

"Opt in" data collection on a "per use basis", thus if a cookie must be set to make a web page work, the cookie only works once and the data is deleted when the browser disconnects unless the user is asked each time.

No personal or machine data collection allowed without opt-in. Opt-in monitored by Federal government entity which represents the consumer in the event of dispute. Thus, the user complains and the Federal government investigages and sets the fine. All fines are minimum $10,000 US (in 2019 dollars) per instance of violation and the fine split 50-50 between the government and the consumer. (Creates a new cottage industry of users tracking what websites and corporations are violators.)

All user data NOT USER EXPLICITLY ALLOWED TO BE RETAINED beyond 30 days (or my preference, 1 hour) is deleted without any consumer action. Server and storage providers are federally licensed and this is part of their license. Violate and both, go to jail and lose the license to store data. Corporation executives may not be members or or associate with corporation executives who lose their license nor may they be paid by current license holders or their umbrella corporations.

All camera and digital editing software auto-blurs all photo/video faces except those specifically authorized by the photographer/videographer during the photo/video session. Authorizing unblurring of faces and publishing them or storing them outside of personal hardware (e.g. no cloud or mailing or net or phone transferring) punishable by $1000 fine per violation and no bankruptcy claims allowed under "inadvertent". Accusation is free and defense is free, as long as, all media is turned over to the government for investigation and decision. Failure to turn over media is a criminal court process.

You're right Wiswill. This can go on for a while.
yy
 

Mark Fuller

TS Booster
I do hope they address the explosion of unwanted ads and popups. I used to do first class research on the web. Now, I have to phish thru the adware and viruses just to get to where I am going. Speaking of governments, I would like to see the FCC get involved and put some teeth into their laws.
 

jjclxrk

TS Rookie
He might've created world wide web but since then internet has grown so much it's out of anyones control, as it should be.
Out of anyone's control.. except for a handful of massive companies that have basically monopolised it?