CyberPowerPC shows off PC case with 18 motorized vents that open and close based on internal...

midian182

Posts: 7,793   +80
Staff member
WTF?! Worried that PC case designers might be running out of ideas? CyberPowerPC has proved that innovation isn’t dead with its Kinetic Series, which features 18 motorized triangular vents and looks like something straight out of Deus Ex.

“Rather than simply adding more airflow, we wanted a case that dynamically provided appropriate airflow for the situation in real-time,” says CyberPowerPC creative director Nam Hoang in the Kinetic Series launch video below.

CyberPowerPC told Tom’s Hardware that the vents are controlled by 18 servos connected to a post and collar inside the chassis. When the system’s internal ambient temperature is low, the vents stay mostly closed to keep noise down and dust out, but when temperatures start to get toasty, they open to increase airflow into the chassis.

Hoang notes that all the vents don’t fully open or close based on a single temperature threshold. Each one can contract and expand to varying degrees based on the temperatures of the system, and users can set the temperature ranges for when the vents should start operating.

The case has triangular cutouts at the top to allow air in when the vents are closed. There also appears to be a dust-preventing mesh cover on the roof.

The mid-tower Kinetic Series case comes in black or white and supports up to ATX motherboards. Users can pack it with radiators up to 360mm in length and up to seven 120mm fans (or five measuring 140mm). It will cost $249 when it goes on sale in Q3, which is around what you’d pay for most higher-end chassis.

It’ll be interesting to see if the Kinetic Series works as well as CyberPowerPC claims, but the case certainly looks cool.

Permalink to story.

 

Dimitriid

Posts: 2,098   +4,011
18 separate servos? Have these guys never heard of KISS? Very gimmicky but of course this is about the bragging rights and little else.

Unfortunately if you look at the design, make it less perfectly symmetrical and put mesh on it instead it's just the Fractal meshify anyway, which people not interested in a showcase PC for pictures only should get instead.
 

Neatfeatguy

Posts: 793   +1,387
Uh...ugh...

wvz1wf.gif
 

QuantumPhysics

Posts: 6,295   +7,225
The easiest way to control temperatures:

#1 AIO with radiator on the CPU
#2 AIO with radiator for the GPU
#3 More fans sucking cool air in than fans blowing air out (which creates a positive pressure environment). This actively compresses air into the case and allows the pressure difference to expel it easier.
#4 Venting near the rear top and rear help the less dense warm air escape easier.
 
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rrwards

Posts: 226   +433
The easiest way to control temperatures:

#1 AIO with radiator on the CPU
#2 AIO with radiator for the GPU
#3 More fans sucking cool air in than fans blowing air out (which creates a negative pressure environment). This actively compresses air into the case and allows the pressure difference to expel it easier.
#4 Venting near the rear top and rear help the less dense warm air escape easier.

"Easiest way to control temperatures, buy all these things, and don't be poor."

Very useful insight as always, thank you QP
 

DrSuess

Posts: 197   +179
I always build my systems with maximum airflow in mind. I don't need to complicate my cooling solution with servos and temperature sensor that can fail due to mechanical issues or buggy control software. I'm old school I don't even like having LED lights in my case, its becoming harder to buy components that don't have some LEDs on them.

Nothing more than a gimmick that might be interesting for a couple of days.
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,735   +4,110
Isn't it ironic that we're spending money on a box that blocks airflow but it's supposed to have airflow to be good and the best PC case is usually the one that has the least amount of "case"?
 

Neatfeatguy

Posts: 793   +1,387
The easiest way to control temperatures:

#1 AIO with radiator on the CPU
#2 AIO with radiator for the GPU
#3 More fans sucking cool air in than fans blowing air out (which creates a negative pressure environment). This actively compresses air into the case and allows the pressure difference to expel it easier.
#4 Venting near the rear top and rear help the less dense warm air escape easier.

I didn't have to spend a ton of money on stupid stuff to improve temps.

I went from a full tower (Fractal Design Arc XL) to a LAN box (or so it is classified as one), the Cooler Master HAF XB Evo. The main reason for the change was to eliminate the GPU sag; getting cooler temps all around was just an added bonus.

One top 200mm fan for exhaust and I just reused my AIO that I was using for the CPU - temps dropped by a good 5C all around, just by changing to a different case.

I had the fans on the rad in a push config and just the 200mm fan on top for exhaust, no other fans.

More fans does not mean better cooloing.
Radiators on CPU/GPU does not mean better cooling.
Get a proper case that allows ideal air flow and a couple of well placed fans can help keep a system at nice, cool temps.
 

DukeJukem

Posts: 286   +316
The easiest way to control temperatures:

#1 AIO with radiator on the CPU
#2 AIO with radiator for the GPU
#3 More fans sucking cool air in than fans blowing air out (which creates a positive pressure environment). This actively compresses air into the case and allows the pressure difference to expel it easier.
#4 Venting near the rear top and rear help the less dense warm air escape easier.
I'd rather just remove the back panel from my case and mount the board on it and lay it flat in the open air. Free.
 

Faelan

Posts: 140   +145
I love how reduced noise is the argument for closing the case when the system isn’t doing anything. I have a big honking mesh case that lets all the noise out and it’s completely silent when running idle. It’s only when working hard that I can hear it and at that point this fancy case would have to open up anyway, so it serves no point other than looking cool.