Dell's Concept Luna focuses on sustainable laptop design

Humza

Posts: 1,007   +170
Staff member
Forward-looking: Dell’s design team has come up with ‘Concept Luna,’ a proof-of-concept laptop that’s easy to repair and maintain, features reusable parts, and is meant to drastically reduce the overall carbon footprint compared to present-day laptop designs. The sleek, aluminum-made, fanless prototype uses smaller, efficient components inside and relies less on screws for better repairability.

Dell has used its Latitude 7300 Anniversary Edition laptop as the benchmark for Concept Luna, noting that the company could achieve up to 50 percent reduction in its overall carbon footprint if it were to implement the design decisions applied in the Concept Luna prototype.

One of the main changes in the exercise involves using smaller internal components and fewer of them. The motherboard has been shrunk by 75 percent, while the component count has been reduced by 20 percent. Dell has also updated the internal layout by placing the motherboard in the top cover of the laptop for passive cooling. This negates the need for a fan, as there’s better separation from the heat-generating battery in the base.

In terms of repairability, Dell notes the use of just four screws (a 10x reduction) for easier and quicker access to internal components. Hardware like the display and unified keyboard assembly uses keystones to lock in place instead of adhesives, and there are fewer connections to handle inside when doing repairs.

Speaking to The Verge, Dell’s design strategist Drew Tosh said that recycling and reusability were the focal points for Concept Luna. He also noted that these design ideas still required validation for mass production. To that end, Tosh estimates many of these concepts to be implemented in Dell’s consumer laptops by 2030.

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Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,364   +5,590
"relies less on screws for better repairability"
This is how you gaslight people. Without screws, you are either relying on fragile tabs to hold the machien together (which are easily broken, necessitating replacement on parts of the chiasses, NOT GREEN AT ALL) or the user of adhesives, which are anthithesis to any sort of repair.

Having supported dell at work for close to a decade now, anything "green" they [romise is the exact opposite,a fagile design taht will outright fail and require throwing out massive portions of the machine if their is a failure, IE soldering RAM and wifi to the motherboard.

Old machines, loaded with screws and seperate components, were far more "green" to maintain and much easier to repair then anything dell churns out now.
 

bviktor

Posts: 843   +1,260
"relies less on screws for better repairability"
This is how you gaslight people. Without screws, you are either relying on fragile tabs to hold the machien together (which are easily broken, necessitating replacement on parts of the chiasses, NOT GREEN AT ALL) or the user of adhesives, which are anthithesis to any sort of repair.

Having supported dell at work for close to a decade now, anything "green" they [romise is the exact opposite,a fagile design taht will outright fail and require throwing out massive portions of the machine if their is a failure, IE soldering RAM and wifi to the motherboard.

Old machines, loaded with screws and seperate components, were far more "green" to maintain and much easier to repair then anything dell churns out now.
Oh it's so good for you to know everything in advance without ever looking behind the high level design!
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,364   +5,590
Oh it's so good for you to know everything in advance without ever looking behind the high level design!
Having worked with dells for 10 years, yeah I'd like to think I can tell when I smell ****. I'm glad you can recognize my talents.

"high level design' is code for "unrepairable ultrathin bullshit' by the way. See also: apple.
 

psycros

Posts: 4,147   +5,775
Recyclable? Maybe. Reusable? Not when Moore's Law is on its deathbed. That's a user-hostile keyboard in any case.
 

Toju Mikie

Posts: 278   +265
"relies less on screws for better repairability"
This is how you gaslight people. Without screws, you are either relying on fragile tabs to hold the machien together (which are easily broken, necessitating replacement on parts of the chiasses, NOT GREEN AT ALL) or the user of adhesives, which are anthithesis to any sort of repair.

Having supported dell at work for close to a decade now, anything "green" they [romise is the exact opposite,a fagile design taht will outright fail and require throwing out massive portions of the machine if their is a failure, IE soldering RAM and wifi to the motherboard.

Old machines, loaded with screws and seperate components, were far more "green" to maintain and much easier to repair then anything dell churns out now.

Unfortunate but true. I've had a personal laptop a few years that had memtest fail and all I had to do was buy another RAM module. I've stayed away from Razer and Apple for the same reason.

At least Dell has many laptops that have easy repairability with less screws but the plastic tabs do break easily. To Dell's credit though, when I had my dell 7577 and I broke part of the bottom panel with the tabs when I tried to upgrade the WiFi card, they replaced the bottom panel for free when I sent it in for service. Any of the fragile parts of the laptop chassis, they do seem to replace them for free if you ask
 

Rayneofpayne

Posts: 502   +415
Focus on securing solid state battery technology first please, probably right now it's the 1 important soon obtainable technology that is going to push laptops in a huge leap forward.
 

Rayneofpayne

Posts: 502   +415
"relies less on screws for better repairability"
This is how you gaslight people. Without screws, you are either relying on fragile tabs to hold the machien together (which are easily broken, necessitating replacement on parts of the chiasses, NOT GREEN AT ALL) or the user of adhesives, which are anthithesis to any sort of repair.

Having supported dell at work for close to a decade now, anything "green" they [romise is the exact opposite,a fagile design taht will outright fail and require throwing out massive portions of the machine if their is a failure, IE soldering RAM and wifi to the motherboard.

Old machines, loaded with screws and seperate components, were far more "green" to maintain and much easier to repair then anything dell churns out now.
You know they are full of ****, the ultimate goal is to make right to repair as hard as possible because they will literally make them throw away units hiding under the guise of environmentally friendly. Also in the next decade it's already predicted there are several technologies coming through that will make traditional laptop design significantly backwards thinking.
 

Danny101

Posts: 2,026   +838
In autobody, we were able to weld plastic bumpers in repairs. Seems like the same principle should apply here. Although, all plastics aren't the same.