Software Did Not Connect: Potential Security Issue

I'm writing from a weak, backup computer. Help will be much appreciated.

My main computer is a desktop, Dell, with plenty of horsepower. I cannot use Firefox or Chrome because the browser is telling me that "Did Not Connect: Potential Security Issue". This is a standalone computer; I am not in a company internet environment. I am, however, in a busy, family wifi environment.

I have gotten this message many times in the past, but in those cases all I had to do was to reboot the computer and that resolved the problem, usually. On the rare occasion that it did not fix the problem, it fixed the problem if I rebooted the computer AND rebooted the router. This time that did not work.

I'm not sure how I will get diagnostic information from my desktop computer to this computer to answer your questions.

Help will be appreciated.


Doug Roberts
 
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  • #2
I'm writing from a weak, backup computer. Help will be much appreciated.

My main computer is a desktop, Dell, with plenty of horsepower. I cannot use Firefox or Chrome because the browser is telling me that "Did Not Connect: Potential Security Issue". This is a standalone computer; I am not in a company internet environment. I am, however, in a busy, family wifi environment.

I have gotten this message many times in the past, but in those cases all I had to do was to reboot the computer and that resolved the problem, usually. On the rare occasion that it did not fix the problem, it fixed the problem if I rebooted the computer AND rebooted the router. This time that did not work.

I'm not sure how I will get diagnostic information from my desktop computer to this computer to answer your questions.

Help will be appreciated.


Doug Roberts
When in Chrome, the error is "Your connection is not private."
When in Firefox, the error is "Did Not Connect: Potential Security Issue"

When in Microsoft Edge, the error came up for accessing Google.com as "This device is blocked by Access Control in the router."

Don't know what all this means.
Doug
 
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Hi -
Problem solved by switching to a different internet connection off of the router.

Thanks.
Doug
 

Cycloid Torus

Posts: 4,640   +1,444
Do yourself a favor:
1. make backups, nothing less than your data (docs, photos, etc) - 2 different sets of media (flash drive, DVD, cloud, service like iDrive or backblaze)
2. do several malware scans - malwarebytes and other big name companies offer free versions for home use
3. make sure you have properly operating anti-malware and do regular updates and scans
4. make sure your connection to your modem is through the WAN port
 

Doug8765

Posts: 261   +5
Do yourself a favor:
1. make backups, nothing less than your data (docs, photos, etc) - 2 different sets of media (flash drive, DVD, cloud, service like iDrive or backblaze)
2. do several malware scans - malwarebytes and other big name companies offer free versions for home use
3. make sure you have properly operating anti-malware and do regular updates and scans
4. make sure your connection to your modem is through the WAN port
Hi -
1) 2) and 3) I put personal docs on a cloud drive, use malwarebytes regularly, use Avast for firewall and do automatic updates. I regularly use CCleaner to clean up temp files.
4) I am clueless about "make sure your connection to your modem is through the WAN port". My internet connection is to a wifi connection in a house full of many internet connections. I thought the Microsoft Edge message was compelling that said "This device is blocked by Access Control in the router."

Doug
 

Cycloid Torus

Posts: 4,640   +1,444
All good. "This device is blocked by Access Control in the router." is typically an issue with router which is cured by restarting the router but can be either a failing NIC or router. The WAN to router connection would be a hardwired connection between the router's RJ45 port which is typically labeled "WAN" for wide area network and the RJ45 port on the modem. This puts the router NAT firewall between the modem (outside/WAN) and the computers (inside/LAN).

If you are using wireless for your connections and you feel that there are too many breakdowns, you might think about trying an inexpensive replacement NIC in one of your open expansion slots or using a wired connection if your system is stationary.
 

Doug8765

Posts: 261   +5
All good. "This device is blocked by Access Control in the router." is typically an issue with router which is cured by restarting the router but can be either a failing NIC or router. The WAN to router connection would be a hardwired connection between the router's RJ45 port which is typically labeled "WAN" for wide area network and the RJ45 port on the modem. This puts the router NAT firewall between the modem (outside/WAN) and the computers (inside/LAN).

If you are using wireless for your connections and you feel that there are too many breakdowns, you might think about trying an inexpensive replacement NIC in one of your open expansion slots or using a wired connection if your system is stationary.
If a NIC is a network interface card, does that mean that, in addition to my router, I also have a card in my computer that does something with the input/output of the router and computer?
 

Cycloid Torus

Posts: 4,640   +1,444
NIC a/k/a Wireless Adapter: Modern laptops have them as part of the package. Some desktops do too with it being part of the motherboard or a card mounted on a PCIe slot. There is a radio on each which carries the signal - and the signal generator itself. Any of these may crimp out. Laptops and wifi enabled motherboards can often receive direct replacements. Alternatives are PCI slot mounted card with antennae out the back and USB connected adapters. Routers are more of a 'black box' - so a replacement of the router is the typical solution.

 

Doug8765

Posts: 261   +5
Hi Cycloid Torus -
My router is a NetGear router that has these oval satellite Orbis that are positioned around the house. It's less than a year old. I bought a NetGear router because I thought they were good quality routers. I don't have specific expertise in evaluating routers. I think you averred that my NetGear router has a NIC in it or that it acts like a NIC.

When I select my network connection from the Network and Internet Settings wizard, assuming that there are two different choices, one called A and another called B. I had been using A. What fixed my problem was to switch to B, the one my teen son uses.

When I bought this router with the Orbi satellites, I was trying to eliminate blind spots in the house. This solution does that, but the coverage is thin - I often get messages that the internet connection is weak. How would I go about tuning it?

Doug
 

Cycloid Torus

Posts: 4,640   +1,444
"that my NetGear router has a NIC" - has capabilities like a NIC - a radio for the carrier.... I've always been pleased by NetGear equipment, but do not have it presently. There is similar equipment at the receiving end which is also capable of two-way transmission.

"messages that the internet connection is weak" - sounds like you have identified the key symptom - I had similar which I cured by using an old router linked to the new one and set up as a repeater. I made the 70' link with CAT5 STP (shielded) ethernet wire ( CAT6 should be used now). Since the house is >200 years old, there are no RJ45 outlets. Since the repeater is within 10' of the couple of auxiliary computers that it services, they work well as the signal is strong.

You may wish to check the signal strength of the channel you have chosen. I'm sure you have a much wider selection than you may realize ... https://www.minim.co/blog/wifi-channels-explained

In your case, I would guess that positioning the units can make a huge difference as well. I have a large stone and brick colonial chimney, so I have to position the router to 'see' around it. In your case you have to contend with staying within the range of not only the system being serviced but also within range of the router.
 

jobeard

Posts: 13,830   +1,749
There are TWO kinds of NICS: The wired RJ45 cable interface w/o any radio equipment and then the WiFi version which sets on top of the Wired interface.

The Wired NIC is the simplest and easiest to connect. The WiFi needs the SSID, Pwd, Band (aka 2.4 vs 5g) and the channel. these oval satellite Orbis will be the most difficult to setup, so start with a wired connection to get your LAN configuration correct.
 

jobeard

Posts: 13,830   +1,749
When I bought this router with the Orbi satellites, I was trying to eliminate blind spots in the house. This solution does that, but the coverage is thin - I often get messages that the internet connection is weak. How would I go about tuning it?
Lookup tunning mesh networks. I would work with ONE Obri at a time, set the distance from the primary router and the height of the Orbi[a] to get reliable connections.

Now add-on the second Orbi(b) and repeat distance from [a] and height to improve that connection. If there's 3rd or 4th, continue adding one at a time to get the performance desired.
 

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