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Get Windows Server-certified with this 60+ hour training

By TS Dealmaster ยท 6 replies
Feb 26, 2018
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  1. Ask any IT expert and they'll tell you that having the right credentials can make or break your chances at landing a position in the tech sector. The MCSA: Windows Server 2016 certification is one of those credentials, and having it validates your ability to administer networks and reduce IT costs, opening the door for work as a computer systems administrator, or computer network specialist.

    The Lifetime MCSA Windows Server 2016 Bundle can prepare you to ace its exams on your own time, and it's on sale for $29.

    This three-course collection boasts more than 60 hours of training designed to help you pass three exams for the MCSA: Windows Server 2016 certification: 70-740, 70-741, and 70-742. This training will familiarize you with key concepts such as installation, storage, and computing with Windows Server 2016, as well as networking and directory domain services, and much more.

    Normally retailing for $999, the Lifetime MCSA Windows Server 2016 Bundle is available to TechSpot readers for $29.

    Note: TechSpot may receive a commission for sales from links on this post through affiliate programs.

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  2. MUMMZ

    MUMMZ TS Enthusiast Posts: 43   +8

    This is actually a brilliant deal. If I didn't see a future with SQL server 2016 Database development and administration for myself, I would definitely take this up!!!
     
  3. ShagnWagn

    ShagnWagn TS Guru Posts: 443   +296

    "Ask any IT expert and they'll tell you that having the right credentials can make or break your chances at landing a position in the tech sector."

    This is INCORRECT. I have been in IT for 24 years professionally. I have interviewed dozens of candidates for all sorts of positions. The people who have several certs are usually the worst candidates. They are typically book smart and unable to apply anything to real-world scenarios - even with experience. I tend to avoid them. Several others I keep in touch with in IT say the same thing.
     
    jobeard likes this.
  4. MUMMZ

    MUMMZ TS Enthusiast Posts: 43   +8

    I gotta agree with you to a certain extent...Having the right certs will open the door to the interview that you might want... But doesn't necessarily mean that you can apply your knowledge from the book to real life production scenarios. The projects that people are involved in or worked on in the past carries more weight than a certification you might hold.
     
  5. antiproduct

    antiproduct TS Booster Posts: 75   +55

    I remember a story a friend in IT told me, he had a co-worker who had all the fancy certs and got a job working with him. Then they were troubleshooting connectivity and he told her to ping the device and she asked him what "ping" was. So yeah, you can learn all the stuff to get a cert, but it doesn't mean you know what you're doing. That being said, I'm sure if you had lots of work experience AND the cert, then it might be helpful.
     
  6. Wizwill

    Wizwill TS Enthusiast Posts: 92   +39

    I have long maintained that formal schooling's primary purpose is to teach elephants (the Herd) how to properly grasp the tail of the elephant in front of you with tour trunk.
     
  7. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 12,360   +1,389

    ALL Microsoft Certs, at the very best, *may be* useful in an infrastructure that is pure Microsoft (birds of a feather). However, being so narrow in scope (content tailored to MS products), these are useless anywhere else. Notice the disdain shown above - - not one comment recommends this path.

    And to add emphasis, the preponderance of web services is Linux based and the tools/background needed are entirely different.
     

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