Google to defend itself in front of the Supreme Court against Oracle's copyright infringement...

Cal Jeffrey

TS Evangelist
Staff member

Google is seeking to overturn a 2018 Federal Circuit Court of Appeals' decision to grant another retrial to Oracle over its claim that companies can copyright application programming interfaces (API). These packages of code allow software of different types and from various developers to work together — specifically Java in this case.

Oracle initially filed suit against Google in 2010, claiming that its Android operating system used proprietary Java APIs without a license, thus infringing upon Oracle's copyrights and patents. Google defeated the lawsuit in a 2012 jury trial in District Court, only to have it overturned by the Circuit. It won the case again it 2016, only to have the appellate court call for yet another retrial.

In January of this year, Google petitioned the Supreme Court of the United States (again) for a hearing on the 2018 decision. The SCOTUS agreed to listen to the appeal. Legal teams will have one hour to present their cases, but no date has been set for the hearing.

"We hope that the Court reaffirms the importance of software interoperability in American competitiveness."

Google hopes that the highest law in the land will agree that its use of the APIs constitutes a fair-use scenario. So far, lower courts have ruled that Android uses the 37 APIs in question in a way that falls under fair use on two separate occasions.

Oracle wanted a third trial, but the District Court judge who had been presiding over the case for more than six years denied another hearing. The company's persistent legal team took it up with the federal appeals court again, which sided with it for a new trial.

The final decision has implications that reach far beyond a beef between Oracle and Google. Microsoft, Mozilla, and other developers fear that a ruling against Google would spell doom for software companies trying to get their programs to cooperate with other applications. The Electronic Frontier Foundation and internet advocacy group Public Knowledge also support the search giant's use of the API packages.

"We welcome the Supreme Court's decision to review the case, and we hope that the Court reaffirms the importance of software interoperability in American competitiveness," Google's Senior Vice President of Global Affairs Kent Walker told The New York Times. "Developers should be able to create applications across platforms and not be locked into one company's software."

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jobeard

TS Ambassador
Absurd case settled by those without software understand at all.

Imagine only ONE TIRE could be classified as R14 Radial!!
 
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Yynxs

TS Addict
"We welcome the Supreme Court's decision to review the case, and we hope that the Court reaffirms the importance of software interoperability in American competitiveness," Google's Senior Vice President of Global Affairs Kent Walker told The New York Times. "Developers should be able to create applications across platforms and not be locked into one company's software."

Later that day, you gotta wonder if they were laughing at the local watering hole and saying "Did you see their faces when I said that?" Bwahahahahah!!!
 

jobeard

TS Ambassador
Isn't there anything that can replace Java?
That's an interesting question. Think what that would require:

  1. The application coding would need to not care what the hardware or OS would be
  2. The runtime libraries would need to be unique to each OS and hardware platform, installed separately

Node.JS may fit that but I'm not certain at this time. The Wiki says
Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform, JavaScript runtime environment that executes JavaScript code outside of a browser. Node.js lets developers use JavaScript to write command line tools and for server-side scripting—running scripts server-side to produce dynamic web page content before the page is sent to the user's web browser. Consequently, Node.js represents a "JavaScript everywhere" paradigm,[6] unifying web-application development around a single programming language, rather than different languages for server- and client-side scripts.​
 
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jobeard

TS Ambassador
Which is what Apple is all about.
That's an amazingly one-side understanding of technical standardization -- just can't get the bias out of the head long enough to see another viewpoint.

Anyone who has written software is embarrassed for you.
 

cliffordcooley

TS Redneck
Anyone who has written software is embarrassed for you.
You seem to be supporting both sides of the fence in your own argument. Apple dictates what goes in their ecosystem. That is the same concept as classifying only one tire as R14 Radials. My comment wasn't meant to be taken under the hood and I know I'm not a software developer. I never claimed to be. You don't have to look under the hood, when signs can be seen from a distance.

This link speaks for me. Sure I'm biased, but I'm not sure that is relevant in this case.
 

jpuroila

TS Booster
Isn't there anything that can replace Java?
It's not that there aren't replacements available(I'm sure there are superior alternatives, even), it's that replacing it at the operating system level would be a big headache. IIRC pretty much all android apps are made with java, so replacing it would mean either throwing them out or rewriting them. Neither of those is a very attractive choice for anyone involved.