Hyundai reportedly pivots engine development entirely to EVs

Daniel Sims

Posts: 392   +16
Staff
What just happened? Just before the end of last year, Hyundai reportedly closed all internal combustion engine development and reassigned its engineers to electronic vehicles. Hyundai is the latest in a line of companies and even governments that have announced moves in support of EVs in the last year.

Industry sources told The Korea Economic Daily that Hyundai closed its combustion engine development and R&D centers. The South Korean company will no longer develop new gas-powered vehicles but will reserve a few engineers to modify existing ones.

Hyundai will move powertrain engineers to an electrification design center, while powertrain performance engineers will now work on EV enhancements. It also established a new battery division to develop better power cells, focusing on design, performance, and raw materials for batteries.

Last August, automated driving systems company Motional announced it would add a Hyundai EV robotaxi to the Lyft app by 2023. Hyundai also unveiled its goal of selling 1.7 million EVs worldwide by 2026.

This shift aligns with how other companies and governments want to move further towards EVs by the middle and end of this decade. In November, we reported that Xiaomi wishes to produce 300,000 EVs per year starting in 2024, and Volvo plans to move entirely to EVs by 2030. Meanwhile, New York wants to ban the sale of new gas-powered vehicles by 2025. The UK also proposed phasing out gas-only cars by 2030.

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Plutoisaplanet

Posts: 680   +1,077
Hyundai also has engineers developing hydrogen fuel cell powertrains (which do still rely electric motors, but only minimally rely on batteries).
 

psycros

Posts: 4,072   +5,591
Hyundai also has engineers developing hydrogen fuel cell powertrains (which do still rely electric motors, but only minimally rely on batteries).

We can hope, because otherwise their cutting their own throats. Hydrogen should have been the focus of EVs 20 years ago. Its the most flexible, most affordable and easiest to implement scheme for minimally polluting vehicles. Most of the world has no way to support the pipe dream of full-electric infrastructure.
 

p51d007

Posts: 3,081   +2,545
We can hope, because otherwise their cutting their own throats. Hydrogen should have been the focus of EVs 20 years ago. Its the most flexible, most affordable and easiest to implement scheme for minimally polluting vehicles. Most of the world has no way to support the pipe dream of full-electric infrastructure.


I have NO problem with EV's or ICE vehicles, but, I think instead of electricity charging, they should pivot towards hydrogen.
 

QuantumPhysics

Posts: 6,237   +7,155
The internal combustion engine has come as far as it can go.

At the top end of the spectrum: Bugatti's W16 making 305 mph.

At the bottom of the spectrum, a bunch of 4-cylinders making up to 300hp.

EV is going to revolutionize the auto industry.

Unfortunately, for Hyundai (and I've lived in South Korea), Electric charging access is a big issue.
 

umbala

Posts: 603   +1,007
We can hope, because otherwise their cutting their own throats. Hydrogen should have been the focus of EVs 20 years ago. Its the most flexible, most affordable and easiest to implement scheme for minimally polluting vehicles. Most of the world has no way to support the pipe dream of full-electric infrastructure.
Yeah, can't wait to see the results of multiple vehicles colliding while carrying large tanks of liquid hydrogen. As for electric infrastructure being a pipe dream, the same could be said about hydrogen fuel cells.
 

koblongata

Posts: 510   +279
We can hope, because otherwise their cutting their own throats. Hydrogen should have been the focus of EVs 20 years ago. Its the most flexible, most affordable and easiest to implement scheme for minimally polluting vehicles. Most of the world has no way to support the pipe dream of full-electric infrastructure.

Er, do you have any idea how much energy it requires to produce hydrogen? And why do you think it's a good idea for people to buy expensive hydrogen from oil companies while electricity is so much cheaper and you can even generate it at home? Please don't tell me because electricity is going to be so cheap in the future so it's OK to buy more expensive hydrogen that uses 3 times more electricity to produce, it will derail the climate goals!
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,342   +2,456
TechSpot Elite
Er, do you have any idea how much energy it requires to produce hydrogen? And why do you think it's a good idea for people to buy expensive hydrogen from oil companies while electricity is so much cheaper and you can even generate it at home? Please don't tell me because electricity is going to be so cheap in the future so it's OK to buy more expensive hydrogen that uses 3 times more electricity to produce, it will derail the climate goals!
I for one wouldn't mind some competition, but hydrogen does seem like a poor choice, though current EVs have certainly faced its share of hurdles, most of it decades old bullshit. Just look in this short thread already just some downright false "observations" on the electrical grids.

Right now, hydrogen extraction to storage to shipping to storage again is a massive expense. And hydrogen requires a huge amount of storage area compared to gasoline stations. Still though, it is an explosive possibility.
 
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ypsylon

Posts: 490   +483
Sign of times.

On one side its good to see it happens, but battery-EV is dead end street from very beginning. Anyone with grasp of basic physics should know that batteries are road to nowhere, finite resource which is extremely polluting to make and recycle.

Hydrogen is the only way forward, but only green hydrogen. Any other hydrogen "color" is as dirty (or in case of cheapest options even worse) as fossil fuels. Because hydro-fuel-corporations will settle on cheapest 'color' (obviously, who cares about planet, only $ matter) we'll accelerate climate change even further, which will make whole process of switch completely irrelevant.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 977   +712
The internal combustion engine has come as far as it can go.

At the top end of the spectrum: Bugatti's W16 making 305 mph.

At the bottom of the spectrum, a bunch of 4-cylinders making up to 300hp.

EV is going to revolutionize the auto industry.

Unfortunately, for Hyundai (and I've lived in South Korea), Electric charging access is a big issue.

I'm sure with new tech . materials , AI design advances they could elk out some more - ICE has had lots and lots of billion R&D

The access point thing is interesting - If you live in a Mega City - maybe better to hire as needed - If you are rich - you can afford that $200 000 garage .
Still fast charge is coming - charge at work and pay - coffee and charge - plus increasing range - lots of people only do 300km/week .
maybe shared ownership pools . I know there are owners that now share luxury/sports cars .
Plus the most obvious - self drive - car drops you off and heads to secure covered parking lot - robots hook up power and clean car etc - with opt in uber self drive as well while you sleep
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,317   +5,502
Er, do you have any idea how much energy it requires to produce hydrogen? And why do you think it's a good idea for people to buy expensive hydrogen from oil companies while electricity is so much cheaper and you can even generate it at home? Please don't tell me because electricity is going to be so cheap in the future so it's OK to buy more expensive hydrogen that uses 3 times more electricity to produce, it will derail the climate goals!
1. EVs have a limited range, poor highway range compared to ICE, and long recharge times. They are also HEAVY. These things will be a major issue for anyone who has to do long range commuting, and have been a concern for EV adoption for decades now.
2. EVs have attrocious energy density. If you do something like, say, tow a small camper trailer with your crossover, EVs simply do. not. work. TFLtruck has tested this multipel times, and even towing a small 2000lbs camper was simply too much for tesla's model x SUV. Rivian's truck suffered a similar fate. For anyone who does such an activity, EVs are not a viable powertrain. Hydrogen is a possible solution, with much faster refueling times.
3. do you really think electricity is going to remain cheap? Guess what! It's gonna go up. We've already seen some areas of california hit $.40 per kWh, a rate that makes EVS nearly as expensive to drive as gas cars in cali, and prices are going Up Up Up! If you put tens of millions of EVs on the road, you're going to get used to electric prices that are over $1/kWh, musk himself said years ago that anyone thinking EVs will be cheaper ot fuel then gas cars is fooling themselves.
4. "climate goals" oh please. If enviromentalists really cared about the enviroment, they would be pushing china to stop building coal plants, same with india, and would be trying to ban the use of bunker oil for container ships, the 14 largest container ships on earth put out more CO2 then every land vehicle in america COMBINED.

EVs are nothing more then a feel good measure, so you can pat yourself on the back for being such a good ally while africa's waterways get polluted from the chind slaves mining cobalt for your fancy electric car battery.

Yeah, can't wait to see the results of multiple vehicles colliding while carrying large tanks of liquid hydrogen. As for electric infrastructure being a pipe dream, the same could be said about hydrogen fuel cells.
Yeah, how could we ever handle vehicles with volumes of explosive liquid today? I just cant imagine how we would manage such a situation.

good thing gasoline is perfectly stable, eh?
I for one wouldn't mind some competition, but hydrogen does seem like a poor choice, though current EVs have certainly faced its share of hurdles, most of it decades old bullshit. Just look in this short thread already just some downright false "observations" on the electrical grids.
Pot calling kettle black there. The observations on the grid are not "bullshit", electrical utilities have already stated that the EV revolution will require a massive upgrade rollout to the grid to be stable, and california has already asked peopel tos top charging EVs during certian times due to grid issues.

Right now, hydrogen extraction to storage to shipping to storage again is a massive expense. And hydrogen requires a huge amount of storage area compared to gasoline stations. Still though, it is an explosive possibility.
Hey, you know what's cool about hydrogen? The sources fo rit are EVERYWHERE. You dont NEED to ship it constantly, hypothetically you could refine hydrogen in almost every city in the US. Imagine the nergy savings from fuel stations being the refinery!

And sorry to burst your bubble, but fancy EVs are not going to solve the trucking issue, so hydrogen is going to become a solution sooner or later.
 

Danny101

Posts: 2,026   +838
Even better, why don't they develop magnetic drives that can receive power from the ether, Tesla style?
 

hwertz

Posts: 125   +68
I like the concept of a setup like the Volt, where you can have some electric charge but also keep going on the gasoline engine when you want to go on a longer trip. I hope Hyundai at least considers the concept of some car that's mainly electric but has a small engine to keep things charged for longer trips.

"They will leave the combustion engine development to Kia. Not surprised..."
Hadn't thought of that... Hyundai can do electrical development and Kia keep focusing on gas engines. Smart, good for Hyundai's PR with the current interest in electric vehicles, while they still have a source for newer gas engine technology if needed. (Current ones are pretty damn high tech, so there may not be any radically new developments to do on them anyway.)
 

Jyrkz

Posts: 145   +109
Hydrogens ftw.
In the end, the only by-product is water.
but yeah they still have along way to go.
 

QuantumPhysics

Posts: 6,237   +7,155
Hydrogens ftw.
In the end, the only by-product is water.
but yeah they still have along way to go.


Hydrogen requires so much energy to produce that it isn't worth it.
Not to mention that the infrastructure isn't ubiquitous.

EV require only the same wiring we use for our current electrical grids, only upgraded in some areas.

The developing world is currently building up their electrical grid (thanks to China) and will end up with a better grid than has ever existed prior.

I've only had gas vehicles up till now, but I know my next car will be EV. The only question is what is the most luxurious interior I can get, and the largest interior possible. I had high hopes for the EQS, but it isn't as perfect to replace my S560.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,342   +2,456
TechSpot Elite
Pot calling kettle black there. The observations on the grid are not "bullshit", electrical utilities have already stated that the EV revolution will require a massive upgrade rollout to the grid to be stable, and california has already asked peopel tos top charging EVs during certian times due to grid issues.

Hey, you know what's cool about hydrogen? The sources fo rit are EVERYWHERE. You dont NEED to ship it constantly, hypothetically you could refine hydrogen in almost every city in the US. Imagine the nergy savings from fuel stations being the refinery!
And sorry to burst your bubble, but fancy EVs are not going to solve the trucking issue, so hydrogen is going to become a solution sooner or later.
There is no "trucking issue". And I assure you it will be much later and not sooner.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,342   +2,456
TechSpot Elite
I've only had gas vehicles up till now, but I know my next car will be EV. The only question is what is the most luxurious interior I can get, and the largest interior possible. I had high hopes for the EQS, but it isn't as perfect to replace my S560.
I was the same until before Halloween, when I decided to give it a whirl and I bought a 2017 Focus EV. Sort of a test run with them and it made me an even bigger fan to be honest. Instant power, near zero maintenance, near silent driving made my opinion of EVs even higher.

My choices had been narrowed down to a Lyriq and a Mach E GT. But I swear man, I just might have already bought a Plaid if I could have got one right away.
 

Danny101

Posts: 2,026   +838
I wouldn't go full electric. Hybrid would be what I want. I don't know if they come with, but a hybrid should also have a plug in as well. The engine for long trips. The plug in for close to home drives.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,342   +2,456
TechSpot Elite
I wouldn't go full electric. Hybrid would be what I want. I don't know if they come with, but a hybrid should also have a plug in as well. The engine for long trips. The plug in for close to home drives.
A plug in hybrid is the best of both worlds right now in my opinion.
The Ford Escape has 220 hp and a 40 mile electric only range.
There are many options, but I mention the Escape because it is $33,000.
 
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TechZel

Posts: 21   +30
We can hope, because otherwise their cutting their own throats. Hydrogen should have been the focus of EVs 20 years ago. Its the most flexible, most affordable and easiest to implement scheme for minimally polluting vehicles. Most of the world has no way to support the pipe dream of full-electric infrastructure.

I fail to see how a suitable full electric infrastructure (which we've been doing for what? A century now?) is a "pipe dream" while building new country-wide infrastructure from scratch to support hydrogen is somehow affordable and easy to implement. And in fact due to the conversion loss, creating the hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles will likely require even more grid power than if those vehicles were BEVs anyway.

Yet another red herring in the energy debate.
 
Yeah, can't wait to see the results of multiple vehicles colliding while carrying large tanks of liquid hydrogen. As for electric infrastructure being a pipe dream, the same could be said about hydrogen fuel cells.
Any worse than vehicles with large tanks of petroleum or lpg? There are technologies in the works that use solid inert pallets that use lasers to release hydrogen as needed.