Latest Windows 10 update is causing BSOD crashes

midian182

Posts: 7,089   +62
Staff member
Facepalm: These days, it's not a question of whether a Windows update will bork some users' systems—that's a given—it's how badly they've been affected. The problems introduced by yesterday's Patch Tuesday are pretty serious: it's causing Blue Screen of Death errors when trying to print something.

As reported by Windows Latest, Windows 10 KB5000802 (March 2021) is an automatic security update, meaning some users didn't have a choice whether to download/install it and risk BSODs. The problem is also present in the KB5000808 update for those using Windows 10 versions 2004 and 20H2.

One of the publication's readers said the update is causing blue screen of death crashes every time someone in their organization uses the printers.

"This update seems to be causing blue screens when printing to Kyocera Universal Print drivers. Have had at least 20 confirmed cases from 4 different clients already and it's only been an hour into the day."

It's unclear how widespread the issue is, though there are reports of it happening with Ricoh, Zebra, and other printer brands. There are also posts from IT admins on Reddit claiming the update broke all Kyocera printing.

The problem appears when hitting the print button in apps including Notepad and Office. It only occurs when a device is connected to a printer.

"I have tried on several workstations removing wusa /uninstall /kb:5000802 solves the problem. Windows 2004 and 20H2 all up2date seems to have identical BSODs. I have also tried to update drivers to recent KX Universal Printer Driver (v.8.1.1109) but that does not solve the problem," one Redditor wrote.

If you're experiencing these issues, the best solution is to uninstall KB5000802/KB5000808 (Settings > Update and Security > Windows Update) and then pausing all updates until Microsoft addresses the problem.

Center image: Shevchenko Evgenii

Permalink to story.

 

nismo91

Posts: 1,149   +186
Im still on 2004 and last week I noticed the windows built in picture print dialog is broken. it is when you right click on an image and click print. there used to be an option for "fit picture to frame" but it is no longer here on my pc.

I only needed to use it about once a year for a specific document and I remember clearly that it was there when I used it last may. goddamn M$
 

kimo1

Posts: 241   +437
That same guy is in every Windows 10 update issue that's posted on Techspot. You'd think by now he'd learn not to update Windows 10 due to shitty things always happening.

I don't even feel bad for him anymore.

Office workers do not to get to choose. PCs are maintained by IT crowd. Getting latest security updates is their priority to protect usually worthless information from getting into wrong hands.
 

madboyv1

Posts: 1,714   +632
Luckily I'm using the very old Kyocera Kyocera PCL Mini-Driver ver 1.0.1522 for computers connected to Kyocera printers. No problems reported with any of my charges.
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 965   +1,785
Not sure this happened before but the fact that this is on a security update is pretty damning: I can understand Microsoft justifying these issues with feature updates since well, it should be all to the IT admins to just not jump on any feature update right away and I do believe they have that level of control.

But security updates is the thing that everybody *should* be able to trust and jump ahead without looking both ways, that's the purpose of security updates: not having to wait to properly test and roll out a feature update and just leaving everything as is but without the vulnerability.

At the very least most companies would benefit from just using VMs for everything so they can roll back to an unpatched image in an emergency but long term, yeah there needs to be alternatives. Maybe this will motivate some industry leaders to start investing in the Linux as also a user desktop OS and not just server side but sadly, I sort of doubt it: they're more likely to consider paying the Apple tax instead and probably suffer less of these issues but without being eliminated altogether.
 

Neatfeatguy

Posts: 451   +722
Office workers do not to get to choose. PCs are maintained by IT crowd. Getting latest security updates is their priority to protect usually worthless information from getting into wrong hands.

How do you know he's not the IT guy. I've worked with some pretty awful "IT" guys before. The one that over sees things at my current workplace is kind of a retard. I had to show him to stop forcing Windows 10 updates to workstations. This came to head last time Windows 10 forced a "security" update that broke printing.

The IT guy here wouldn't believe me that a Windows 10 update broke the print spooler service and was causing constant printer crashes and errors on computers. Since he has things locked down I couldn't just remove the only update that happened the night before....I told him the only change to my system was a Win 10 update. Printing worked without fail the day before and now, after the update it wasn't working.

He spent 6 hours on my computer trying to re-install printer drivers, test other printers, adjust settings, rebooting the computer over and over again......after almost a full day of stupid troubleshooting he finally uninstalled the update and printing started working again...yeah!

Sadly, the mor0n didn't know how to prevent Windows from forcing the update and for the next 3 days I had to have him uninstall the update because it was pushed to my computer every night.
 

BSim500

Posts: 839   +1,889
Oh no its the usual TechSpot updates causing crashes post again! I guess when you have over 800 million installs these things can happen...
Well being informed about it sure beats being one of the "anyone who desires a reliable OS is a MS hater" shills that seem to populate these forums. As for what they broke this time, it's really some "achievement" to actually manage to break printing in notepad...

I strongly recommend any W10 user here with a Kyocera printer upgrade to a superior more functional OS if you want to use your printer. Like Windows 3.1 managed (link)... :laughing:
 

terzaerian

Posts: 982   +1,422
Maybe this will motivate some industry leaders to start investing in the Linux as also a user desktop OS and not just server side but sadly, I sort of doubt it: they're more likely to consider paying the Apple tax instead and probably suffer less of these issues but without being eliminated altogether.
Apple has zero respect for backwards compatibility and that **** just isn't gonna fly with enterprise - there is millions and billions in legacy equipment and applications that can't be cut off, for myriad reasons.

This may actually end up being what drives Linux on the desktop to supremacy for enterprise, as Linux is steadily acquiring a reputation as being more backwards compatible than Windows is, with older Windows and PC applications.
 

psycros

Posts: 3,572   +4,360
Apple has zero respect for backwards compatibility and that **** just isn't gonna fly with enterprise - there is millions and billions in legacy equipment and applications that can't be cut off, for myriad reasons.

This may actually end up being what drives Linux on the desktop to supremacy for enterprise, as Linux is steadily acquiring a reputation as being more backwards compatible than Windows is, with older Windows and PC applications.

As long as Linux is still the bazaar of endless distros it will never achieve any significant desktop presence. While some distros now equal or even exceed Windows 10 in ease-of-use its not as fast or stable and doesn't have the breadth of software Microsoft's platform does. In short, it has a lot of the same issues as macOS, but it will run on anything. The very low initial cost of adoption (and near- immunity to malware) is really Linux's only selling point but you still need solid support to make it work right. If you're lucky enough to have an in-house guru who is already on the payroll it can work, but if you try to puzzle things out on your own you'll quickly be in over your head.
 

terzaerian

Posts: 982   +1,422
As long as Linux is still the bazaar of endless distros it will never achieve any significant desktop presence. While some distros now equal or even exceed Windows 10 in ease-of-use its not as fast or stable and doesn't have the breadth of software Microsoft's platform does. In short, it has a lot of the same issues as macOS, but it will run on anything. The very low initial cost of adoption (and near- immunity to malware) is really Linux's only selling point but you still need solid support to make it work right. If you're lucky enough to have an in-house guru who is already on the payroll it can work, but if you try to puzzle things out on your own you'll quickly be in over your head.
For general use, maybe, but as Windows drifts further and further from valuing backwards supremacy, enterprise will be forced to act - either keep using Windows and either write off legacy equipment and software (which either accomplishes something current equipment can't, or replacing with current equipment would be prohibitively expensive), or stop using Windows relative to it and train someone to specifically use Linux for that purpose. Enterprise IT is already managing Linux on servers in many cases, so for anything that specialized user can't troubleshoot, they can swoop in, just as with Windows. Linux may incrementally creep in further from there.

m$ is your nr1 enemy... always turn off automatic updates.
I highly recommend that, if you must Windows, you install Windows Pro, whether you have a license or not, and use Group Policy to do it. It's a one-shot nuke and I love it.
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 965   +1,785
As long as Linux is still the bazaar of endless distros it will never achieve any significant desktop presence. While some distros now equal or even exceed Windows 10 in ease-of-use its not as fast or stable and doesn't have the breadth of software Microsoft's platform does. In short, it has a lot of the same issues as macOS, but it will run on anything. The very low initial cost of adoption (and near- immunity to malware) is really Linux's only selling point but you still need solid support to make it work right. If you're lucky enough to have an in-house guru who is already on the payroll it can work, but if you try to puzzle things out on your own you'll quickly be in over your head.

Maybe the answer would be to look at a combination of all of this: For most day to day usage, macs (Or Linux but that takes lots of effort for the reasons you mentioned) is probably on the "Good enough" category. So most of your office employees just doing things like outlook, zoom meetings, word processing and spreadsheet work would be fine with Apple.

For more specialized applications you are right that it probably is too costly to move to either at this point, but thin clients in the form of VMs would also fit the "good enough" category: I've got a regular desktop with basic office software installed but for my dev stuff we have a single VM that we usually just clone and I remote into it. It's not the most comfortable thing in the world but it is certainly better than spending a full week of work with a ton of IT tickets to install a long list of software I need then do it all over again when I am no longer on the loaner machine and my permanent one arrives.

I can deal with some latency when clicking or typing is not too bad with broadband, what would probably be a deal breaker is one of these random bugs suddenly K.O.ing my set up for who knows how long, whereas a VM we just call IT, load the previously saved image before the craziness patch went live and we're back in business within an evening.
 

Darth Shiv

Posts: 2,208   +779
Oh no its the usual TechSpot updates causing crashes post again!
I guess when you have over 800 million installs these things can happen...
If they didn't bundle crapware with the security updates it wouldn't be anywhere near as frequent. That's why it's a problem. And we know the solution. It's "what they used to do". I do like CUs in a respect but when you break things for non-security related reasons coupled with critical security updates, you are doing it wrong.
 

MaxSmarties

Posts: 501   +294
Apple has zero respect for backwards compatibility and that **** just isn't gonna fly with enterprise - there is millions and billions in legacy equipment and applications that can't be cut off, for myriad reasons.

This may actually end up being what drives Linux on the desktop to supremacy for enterprise, as Linux is steadily acquiring a reputation as being more backwards compatible than Windows is, with older Windows and PC applications.
OMG not this linux-s#IT again...
Linux it's acquiring a reputation since ... forever, and still is a niche product (ed always will be).
 

MaxSmarties

Posts: 501   +294
For general use, maybe, but as Windows drifts further and further from valuing backwards supremacy, enterprise will be forced to act - either keep using Windows and either write off legacy equipment and software (which either accomplishes something current equipment can't, or replacing with current equipment would be prohibitively expensive), or stop using Windows relative to it and train someone to specifically use Linux for that purpose. Enterprise IT is already managing Linux on servers in many cases, so for anything that specialized user can't troubleshoot, they can swoop in, just as with Windows. Linux may incrementally creep in further from there.


I highly recommend that, if you must Windows, you install Windows Pro, whether you have a license or not, and use Group Policy to do it. It's a one-shot nuke and I love it.
yes, Linux is used on server and guess what: you don't really "use" servers. Your interaction with servers basically is for maintenance only.
 

Darth Shiv

Posts: 2,208   +779
Apple has zero respect for backwards compatibility and that **** just isn't gonna fly with enterprise - there is millions and billions in legacy equipment and applications that can't be cut off, for myriad reasons.

This may actually end up being what drives Linux on the desktop to supremacy for enterprise, as Linux is steadily acquiring a reputation as being more backwards compatible than Windows is, with older Windows and PC applications.
First part I agree with. Second part you are dreaming.

Linux on desktop is dead. It had its chance. Portable device / no mouse+kb is where the majority of consumer market is going. Application ecosystem is staying with Windows for desktop.

Linux NEVER achieved readiness for consumer. The fragmentation in GUI is the issue. Applications need full configurability by default via GUI not commandline for most of the market consumers to take it seriously. They never polished it to that level of user friendliness. 99% of Windows users won't do anything more complicated on commandline than "ipconfig" or "ping". Until Linux gets to that place, it will always be an also-ran on desktop and now it's simply too late.
 

terzaerian

Posts: 982   +1,422
OMG not this linux-s#IT again...
Linux it's acquiring a reputation since ... forever, and still is a niche product (ed always will be).
I'm not arguing Linux ISN'T a niche product. I myself have been on record with how frustrated I am with the contempt that Linux as an ecosystem seems to have for the GUI.

My point is that when a manger is doing a cost-benefit analysis, he's going to be faced with three options: 1) upgrade and potentially incur an enormous cost in terms of equipment and/or software and retraining everyone, just because Windows rolled over a version number, 2) install an old (and insecure) version of Windows, or 3) install a free operating system whose backwards compatibility supports the legacy and leverage existing efficiencies in IT to pick up the slack. This isn't the 90s, this is the post-COVID economy, where graphics cards cost as much as a used car, so 1) isn't an option anymore. While a lot of managers are picking option 2) as cybersecurity becomes increasingly salient, they're going to be blocked from doing it, and at some point someone big is going to pick 3) and make it work. And once they do, business is monkey-see, monkey-do.
 

zamroni111

Posts: 200   +138
I postpone feature update for a year but version 2004 will be force fed on next may while it still has many functionality problems
 

Trapped Nowhere

Posts: 76   +72
For general use, maybe, but as Windows drifts further and further from valuing backwards supremacy, enterprise will be forced to act - either keep using Windows and either write off legacy equipment and software (which either accomplishes something current equipment can't, or replacing with current equipment would be prohibitively expensive), or stop using Windows relative to it and train someone to specifically use Linux for that purpose. Enterprise IT is already managing Linux on servers in many cases, so for anything that specialized user can't troubleshoot, they can swoop in, just as with Windows. Linux may incrementally creep in further from there.


I highly recommend that, if you must Windows, you install Windows Pro, whether you have a license or not, and use Group Policy to do it. It's a one-shot nuke and I love it.
Is it possible to migrate installed programs or is it just better to just overwrite and install on a blank hdd?
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 965   +1,785
Linux NEVER achieved readiness for consumer. The fragmentation in GUI is the issue. Applications need full configurability by default via GUI not commandline for most of the market consumers to take it seriously. They never polished it to that level of user friendliness. 99% of Windows users won't do anything more complicated on commandline than "ipconfig" or "ping". Until Linux gets to that place, it will always be an also-ran on desktop and now it's simply too late.

I think this is extremely close to being the case for not needing the command line at all in the more friendly distros like Ubuntu and Mint and even Manjaro. But the other part of the statement remains true: I usually cannot say "Just get Ubuntu" without some apps just being more developed and better on KDE and if I point to Mint they're immediately greeted with "You want Mate or Cinnamon?" and now a simple recommendation turned into at the very least 4 distinct flavors.

For a while it did look like Ubuntu was close to getting to that point of being the default but they made some terrible decisions like trying to over-extend into mobiles and making some UI choices that were sub-optimal at best. I really wish I could rewrite their history and had them just fully embrace Mint's Cinnamon desktop when the Gnome team started to just go into weird and unnecessary directions but Ubuntu developed unity and went into their own, different but still weird and unnecessary directions.