NAND flash prices predicted to keep falling due to oversupply

midian182

Posts: 5,984   +49
Staff member

DRAMeXchange, part of analyst firm TrendForce, says the price fall is due to demand for NAND flash being weaker than expected. At the same time, improved yield rates and production capacity have seen supply increase—yields for 3D NAND flash are on their way to exceeding 80 percent by the fourth quarter of this year. All of which has resulted in oversupply at various levels.

DRAMeXchange says weak demand for NAND Flash is partly due to the declining smartphone market, which, according to IDC, saw shipments fall 1.8 percent YoY during the most recent quarter.

“First, the annual shipments for smartphones this year are expected to be just on par with last year’s. The replacement demand for smartphones has been sluggish due to the lack of differentiation among products in terms of hardware specifications,” said DRAMeXchange.

“Second, notebook shipments were very strong in [the first half of this year], so the seasonal shipment growth for notebooks in [the second half] will be lackluster compared with the growth in the year’s first half as the base period.”

The highly competitive server SSD market is also an issue. As this segment is proving so profitable, there is now an oversupply of server SSDs.

The decline in NAND flash prices is expected to continue into the first quarter of next year—a traditionally slow season. “Meanwhile, most suppliers are working to make the transition from the 64/72-layer architecture to the 96-layer. This ongoing technology migration is expected to increase the overall output and keep the market in oversupply.”

Ultimately, this is good news for those looking to upgrade/increase their storage. If you wait until the holiday season, you could get a new SSD at a rock bottom price.

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Hammayon

Posts: 138   +47
I was just about to buy a 512 GB M.2 NVME Samsung Evo with read and write of 3,400 MBps for my Alienware 17 R4 for only $229.00 Canadian off Newegg.ca. This is a lucky read, I can always wait since there is a SSD with read/write of 550 MBps already in there. HOw much does a difference does 3,400 vs 550 make anyway for boot times, programs etc. I mean 550 is already fast enough?
 

Raytrace3D

Posts: 184   +175
I was just about to buy a 512 GB M.2 NVME Samsung Evo with read and write of 3,400 MBps for my Alienware 17 R4 for only $229.00 Canadian off Newegg.ca. This is a lucky read, I can always wait since there is a SSD with read/write of 550 MBps already in there. HOw much does a difference does 3,400 vs 550 make anyway for boot times, programs etc. I mean 550 is already fast enough?
I upgraded from my EVO 850 SSD to a 960 EVO (M.2 NVME) and noticed a massive difference in boot... most of all though in application load like photoshop and in games when loading content/levels. Well worth it.
 

m3tavision

Posts: 549   +318
I was just about to buy a 512 GB M.2 NVME Samsung Evo with read and write of 3,400 MBps for my Alienware 17 R4 for only $229.00 Canadian off Newegg.ca. This is a lucky read, I can always wait since there is a SSD with read/write of 550 MBps already in there. HOw much does a difference does 3,400 vs 550 make anyway for boot times, programs etc. I mean 550 is already fast enough?
Not so much that, but with the Operating System sitting on a SSD, it is a freeflowing process. So an upscale SSD helps.. & usually has longer duration. Don't forget, IOPS matter too...


How these new one's fare..? It won't matter so much on any of our systems, as the current Samsung EVO is already ridiculously fast. The new one's are stupid fast.
 
On tiger direct, I saw a deal for the 250 GB NAND M.2 going for only $89.99 from $169.99 at a limited of time, however, it is good I didn't buy it since it may be going for much less soon. This particular one has V-NAND. I was surprised to see it going for that much less, even though it is not a newer NVME.

I think I will wait until it is much cheaper, like around the $40-$50 range, until I buy it. The Intel SSDs M.2 are starting at around $119.99 for a PCI-E module. Even more better, is the Intel 128GB SSD M.2 NVME, 3D TLC for 83.99 ...

If you want a chip based cape, then I would choose this one for running Linux potentially, Intel Pro 7600p M.2 2280 128GB. At newegg, it goes for only 89.99 ... and it has many software features, and it is good for enthusiasts.

Actually, if you just want a good hard drive for a cheap price, then I would go with a Kingston or an Intel SSDNow60 or S 3610 ... Even a King Dian might have what you need. Most of the high-end SSDs and M.2 cards are not made for full-range computing, unless it is mobile, or a high-end business network or gaming server.
 
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