Native CD ripping returns to Windows 11 in latest Insider build

Humza

Posts: 1,023   +171
Staff member
In brief: Do you remember ripping CDs to save your favorite tracks, create a personal library or burn your selection to a new CD? Perhaps the last time was a decade ago. Nevertheless, the ability to do so will soon be returning to Windows 11 with its default Media Player, alongside an improved Camera app and widget experience.

Microsoft continues to add missing features to Windows 11 and will need to do so for quite some time if it wants more Windows 10 users to move to the latest OS. Although the company's latest Windows Insider update doesn't exactly set the world on fire, like making the Start menu more configurable or bringing back basic drag and drop functionality to the Taskbar, improvements to the OS' native apps are still a welcome addition that make it more useful overall.

Alongside new notification badges in widgets and dozens of fixes, the latest Insider build also features a revamped Camera app that can now read QR codes and barcodes, plus the ability to rip CDs with the default Media Player.

Having received CD playback support earlier this year, the new feature in Media Player lets users rip CDs to WMA, FLAC, ALAC, or AAC format, with the latter being the default setting. Moreover, Microsoft says the Media Player will now be used for local video playback, instead of the Movies & TV app.

In terms of other updates in this Insider build, Microsoft appears to be testing several layouts for Search on the Taskbar. The company notes that some devices will get different visual treatment for this functionality, including two open text-entry search box variations and a third icon-only appearance for a minimalist look that adds another click to the search experience.

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Avro Arrow

Posts: 2,433   +2,948
TechSpot Elite
Who the hell uses CDs anymore, really?

This is just Microsoft not knowing what its priorities should be. The headaches that I've heard people having because of W11's backwards-incompatibilities should have as many resources dedicated to them as possible. Instead, Microsoft "fixes" an issue that wasn't an issue to begin with.

As the article states:
"Do you remember ripping CDs to save your favorite tracks, create a personal library or burn your selection to a new CD? Perhaps the last time was a decade ago."

Well, over the past decade, I haven't heard people crying for this ever. In fact, I prefer using whatever free 3rd-party ripping software that I got from FileHippo or Tucows to whatever native feature Windows had (it's been so long since I've done this that I can't even remember what the program is called). I also MUCH prefer using Media Player Classic to Windows Media Player. I would call WMP hot garbage but there's notHing hot about it so it's just garbage.
 
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wiyosaya

Posts: 7,831   +6,816
Who the hell uses CDs anymore, really?

This is just Microsoft not knowing what its priorities should be. The headaches that I've heard people having because of W11's backwards-incompatibilities should have as many resources dedicated to them as possible. Instead, Microsoft "fixes" an issue that wasn't an issue to begin with.

As the article states:
"Do you remember ripping CDs to save your favorite tracks, create a personal library or burn your selection to a new CD? Perhaps the last time was a decade ago."

Well, over the past decade, I haven't heard people crying for this ever. In fact, I prefer using whatever free 3rd-party ripping software that I got from FileHippo or Tucows to whatever native feature Windows had (it's been so long since I've done this that I can't even remember what the program is called). I also MUCH prefer using Media Player Classic to Windows Media Player. I would call WMP hot garbage but there's noting hot about it so it's just garbage.
While I agree with much of what you say, I run Media Portal on my HTPC. It requires WMP, however, Media Portal is a drastic improvement over WMP.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 2,433   +2,948
TechSpot Elite
While I agree with much of what you say, I run Media Portal on my HTPC. It requires WMP, however, Media Portal is a drastic improvement over WMP.
Sure, but is it better than Media Player Classic? I absolutely love that software.

The ironic thing about Media Player Classic is that Microsoft originally created it, it's one of the best programs that they've ever made and so of course, they came up with something to replace it that was worse. :laughing:
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,130   +826
I never tried windows xp media center edition-think you paid extra - but it had a lot of adherents who liked it .
Imagine if Microsoft continue this a slimmed down Windows and gaming/media hub.
Tied to Windows phones and windows tablets .
If they this this right and now with Windows ARM integration .+XBOX
They would be the richest company by far
Phones,
Tablets.
PCs,
TV portal
Xbox
Advertising etc
Incorporate something like Gog galaxy., allowed emulator integration into library
 

p51d007

Posts: 3,224   +2,763
Can't remember when I used a CD/DVD last.
Heck, once in a while, I'll need to run an ISO, I just use a VM "CD" to run it on.
 

quadibloc

Posts: 362   +243
I'm amazed that Microsoft is including this ability in their operating system. Won't the RIAA be crying bloody murder, and taking legal and political action to have Microsoft Windows banned unless it removes this?
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,831   +6,816
Sure, but is it better than Media Player Classic? I absolutely love that software.

The ironic thing about Media Player Classic is that Microsoft originally created it, it's one of the best programs that they've ever made and so of course, they came up with something to replace it that was worse. :laughing:
From my experience, Microsoft's definition of "improvement" is "to make things worse", and I think that stems from over-confidence in how Microsoft thinks that users will use or do use their software rather than getting feedback from actual users of their software to find out what those users would like, and how those same users use their software.

As far as Media Portal being better than Media Player Classic, its hard for me to say as I never used Media Player Classic to any great extent.

What I do know is that Media Portal is likely far more capable than Media Player Classic - especially if you add some of the plug-ins and such. It allows me to play DVDs and Blu-rays (and would if I had the complete set of hardware for it - which I will get likely next year) play UHD Blu-ray, too. Not only that, but it records any OTA TV that I would like it to record, plays my music collection, consolidates various internet video sources like Ted Talks, You Tube, and others, Version 2.X has integrated Netflix (maybe other streaming services, too, but I have not had the time to set it up), and all that is contained in just one program - Media Portal.

My HTPC runs Windows, so I cannot comment on whether its better, based on actual use, than Kodi, for instance, except to say that I investigated HTPC Software, and chose Media Portal over Kodi because it seemed much more mature and functional. I have not regretted that choice. For me, its an impressive piece of software and has enhanced the experience of home entertainment for my Wife and I. Perhaps the best thing about it is that it is free and open source. I have, though, given donations to the cause.
 
I never tried windows xp media center edition-think you paid extra - but it had a lot of adherents who liked it .
Imagine if Microsoft continue this a slimmed down Windows and gaming/media hub.
Tied to Windows phones and windows tablets .
If they this this right and now with Windows ARM integration .+XBOX
They would be the richest company by far
Phones,
Tablets.
PCs,
TV portal
Xbox
Advertising etc
Incorporate something like Gog galaxy., allowed emulator integration into library
I think Windows XP Media Center Edition was about the same price as the standard Windows XP when I bought it. Windows Media Center was later included in Vista and 7 but most people never knew what it was because Microsoft did such a poor job of advertising it and mostly left that to the PC manufacturers. Many people confused it with Windows Media Player and never understood that it was a DVR/HTPC program for recording TV shows, watching slide shows, and playing music but was meant to use your living room TV as the monitor, a surround sound system for speakers, and be controlled with a remote control while sitting on your sofa and use extender boxes like the Xbox connected to the other TVs in the house to stream the shows from the WMC server. Microsoft really dropped the ball when they never promoted it and eventually killed it and Windows Home Server. They allowed unlimited storage of your TV shows and were far better than a TiVo or DVR from a cable or satellite TV company. Emby and Plex are great replacements for WMC and I'm currently recording both regular digital ATSC HD TV with DD 5.1 sound and NextGen ATSC 3.0 TV with Dolby AC-4 sound broadcasts using Emby and an HDHomeRun 4K tuner. Unfortunately, none of the stations around me are broadcasting in 4K yet but the 1080 picture is still clearer than streams and there's no buffering. Any old desktop computer can be reused as a dedicated Emby Server/DVR. The Emby Server software is cross-platform and I currently use it in Windows 10 but I'm switching to Linux Mint this afternoon due to Microsoft requiring TPM for Windows 11 and I'm not going to replace perfectly good hardware for that. The Emby app is available on most streaming devices and smart TVs so it's easy to watch the shows from your Emby Server on any TV in the house and the new streaming devices are much smaller, use a lot less power, and aren't as expensive as an Xbox.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,130   +826
and an HDHomeRun 4K tuner. Unfortunately, none of the stations around me are broadcasting in 4K yet but the 1080 picture is still clearer than streams and there's no buffering. Any old desktop computer can be reused as a dedicated Emby Server/DVR. The Emby Server software is cross-platform and I currently use it in Windows 10 but I'm switching to Linux Mint this afternoon due to Microsoft requiring TPM for Windows 11 and I'm not going to replace perfectly good hardware for that. The Emby app is available on most streaming devices and smart TVs so it's easy to watch the shows from your Emby Server on any TV in the house and the new streaming devices are much smaller, use a lot less power, and aren't as expensive as an Xbox.
Every once it a while I look at emby , plex , jellyfin etc - see the life time offers etc
I just seem to like encoding - and collecting good encodes of classic movies - thinking I will watch them one day - but have too many projects
Use to own a backpackers - so had a huge VHS collection I copied from DVD to tape ( on chinese player - press these buttons to remove copy protection )
use to crack me up my copies were better than real VHS tapes I bought .
Then bought lots of Blu-rays for hostel - was always planning on making a huge server for hostel - Then netflix etc came along
I still enjoy encoding - looking at bluray and decided how I will encode it - I will remove some temporal noise and sparkle -as that's not real grain to me .
I will rein in a bit of grain if I don't rank a movie that high or I think is too distracting ( saves space - use light setting at most ) .
As for purist encoders - studios can be huge variable themselves - so even they can't agree when doing remasters

I just like knowing I have classic french movies , great 1950s movies etc, world cinema etc complete waste of money with time and hard drives .
I like to "travel" if I watch certain movies to another time , country and the likes of Netflex are limited in this - as they know people want Die Hard , Speed, 10 things about Mary etc - nothing wrong with those movies - comfort food for many
 

Underdog

Posts: 264   +161
Maybe MS have noticed the resurgence of interest in physical media. Both vinyl and CDs have seen an upturn in sales after a long decline. There's more to music than a pair of earbuds and selecting shuffle play from a boggling list of paid-for online sources. A growing number of people want the whole experience. They want to own their music, not rent it. So many people are getting back to this stuff that the manufacturers are in crisis mode trying to keep up with demand. See the prices being paid for vinyl that might be in doubtful condition these days. CDs are the fall back choice when people can't afford the original pressing on LP. Gone are the days when you could pick up a box of CDs for a dollar/Euro/Pound.