Police drop in on streamer after hearing him shouting for help during Apex Legends game

midian182

Posts: 7,895   +82
Staff member
What just happened? We’ve seen far too many stories in recent years about streamers being visited/arrested by cops following a swatting, but this story is a happier one. An Apex Legends player who had been calling out to his teammates for help was visited by police after they mistook his cries for those of distress—and it was all caught on camera.

Twitch streamer Vuzby had been engaged in an Apex Legends match that was getting pretty intense, leading to him loudly calling out for help from his teammates. Game Rant reports that someone heard the streamer’s pleas and alerted two local Canadian police officers, who had also heard Vuzby shouting.

After knocking on his window, police tried the front door. Vuzby’s girlfriend let them in, and they proceeded into the room where he was streaming the game. You can see in the clip how surprised he is to see the officer, explaining that he did scream for help, but it was “for content.”

The policeman takes the whole thing in good humor, waving to the viewers and noting that screaming for help online while next to an open window is likely to attract the authorities’ attention. “I hope you get lots of views on your channel,” he added.

For many streamers, especially those in the US, the sight of police appearing unexpectedly can mean they’ve been swatted—the act of calling 911 to report a fake crime so armed responders storm an address. It recently happened to Twitch streamer Alexandra “Alliestrasza” Macpherson, a well-known Hearthstone player and a member of esports organization Fade 2 Karma. Her entire family were handcuffed during the incident. Thankfully, nobody came to any physical harm.

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wiyosaya

Posts: 7,699   +6,641
Its great the police did not go in with guns blazing in full tactical gear. Then again, someone simply reported that he was calling for help - unlike the swatting instances where the police get reports, albeit fake, of something nefarious going on.

Unfortunately, I think it may well have ended quite differently if someone had reported that there was something nefarious going on as continued instances of police responding to swatting instances and, apparently, not stopping to validate their actions.

I get it that police do not know, but in cases of swatting, that seems to be the problem - police do not know and, apparently, do not take the time to investigate the validity of the report. Perhaps that is beginning to happen as the article does state that there have been recent swatting instances that have not resulted in injuries - though it does sound like the swatting "victims" have been terrorized by the police.

I don't see that as the fault of the police, though. Its the A-holes that think swatting is a great way to express their jealousy or whatever it is they cannot figure out how to express in a healthier manner.
 

MyIOnU

Posts: 77   +207
Next time when someone from that house actually calls for help, people may not call polices again.
 

BigRedPDX

Posts: 271   +191
Concerned neighborhood police. I like it. I probably would drop by too if I heard someone scream help. The officer looked excited to be on the stream though.
 

terzaerian

Posts: 1,264   +1,757
That's the important thing, IMO, and dropping by without guns blazing goes a long way towards fostering trust in those who are supposed to "protect and serve".
That's the thing; neighborhood policing, school resource officers, and mental health liaisons are all services that police departments like to have available, but when their budgets get cut departments have to shift their focus to their core elements - calls for service. That means redirecting neighborhood resource officers etc. back to regular beats where they have no relationship or foreknowledge of the situation's context aside from what dispatch has been able to impart to them and whatever warnings flash in their squad's software in the past minute before they got on the scene.

So the biggest thing BLM's drive last year to 'defund the police' did was to damage these kinds of long-term relationship-building programs nationwide.
 
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Koguma

Posts: 7   +3
That's the thing; neighborhood policing, school resource officers, and mental health liaisons are all services that police departments like to have available, but when their budgets get cut departments have to shift their focus to their core elements - calls for service. That means redirecting neighborhood resource officers etc. back to regular beats where they have no relationship or foreknowledge of the situation's context aside from what dispatch has been able to impart to them and whatever warnings flash in their squad's software in the past minute before they got on the scene.

So the biggest thing BLM's drive last year to 'defund the police' did was to damage these kinds of long-term relationship-building programs nationwide.

Stop trying to twist the facts. 'defund the police' was specifically to channel money to these kinds of programs instead of funding the police slush funds.
How do you think these programs are funded, hmmm? Do you think the police fund it themselves?