Restriction on file transfer size to external hard drive?

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aznn3rd

Posts: 112   +0
Over the weekend, I tried transferring a 6GB iso to two different external hard drives, but each time the error was that the file was too large, even though there were over 100GB of free space left on either hard drive. Do you guys know what the problem could be?
 

DaMak420

Posts: 179   +0
It is likely a Fat32 file system....... I believe the limit is 1 byte short of 4 gigs

I dont remmy if there is a limit for NTFS or not, but that is probably the issue.
 
D

DelJo63

correct, and NFTS has no practical limit on the file other than
file size < partition size
 

aznn3rd

Posts: 112   +0
I'm pretty confused. Can you guys explain how FAT and NFTS works and how I can apply that to fixing my problem?

Thanks
 

gguerra

Posts: 314   +0
Your external hard drive is formatted as Fat32 as are many externals. In order to save files over 4gb you will have to re-format the drive. Go to My computer and right click on the drive and choose format. Save your data first of course. Re-format as NTFS. The only problem is that when you do NTFS on a removable drive you will have to go through the whole unplug thing via the tray icon. In other words you must stop the device before unplugging. With Fat32 you unplug and plug at will. In fact you might have to disable quick remove to format NTFS.

Check this for more info http://www.pctipsbox.com/format-a-usb-drive-with-ntfs-file-system/

If you want to keep fat32 and save your 6gb file you will have to split it up with winrar or something similar or extract the iso and save it as separate files.
 

LookinAround

Posts: 6,429   +186
Are you sure that will work with removable USB drives, I don't think so. You are talking about regular fixed hard drives.

ummm...let's think about this.....

your removable USB drive.... does it have a file system on it?

It must or Windows couldn't read it.

So why would you think removable USB drive is any different when converting file systems?
 

gguerra

Posts: 314   +0
ummm...let's think about this.....

your removable USB drive.... does it have a file system on it?

It must or Windows couldn't read it.

So why would you think removable USB drive is any different when converting file systems?

I guess he'll just have try it huh?
 

LookinAround

Posts: 6,429   +186
Your external hard drive is formatted as Fat32 as are many externals. In order to save files over 4gb you will have to re-format the drive. Go to My computer and right click on the drive and choose format. Save your data first of course. Re-format as NTFS. The only problem is that when you do NTFS on a removable drive you will have to go through the whole unplug thing via the tray icon. In other words you must stop the device before unplugging. With Fat32 you unplug and plug at will. In fact you might have to disable quick remove to format NTFS.

gguerra

Just re-read in more detail your earlier post. I think you're mixing up different issues

1. Write caching.
You can get better disk performance if you enable write caching for a disk drive. This means Windows caches several disk writes together in cache before it physically writes it all to the drive. If you set a drive for no caching Windows will perform each write to the drive as they are issued. one-at-a-time

2. Write caching can give better performance.. but can also give headaches
Problem with write caching is if Windows crashes or you unplug a USB drive there are several writes that never make it to disk. This can cause file and file system corruption depending on what it was not getting written.

3. Stopping a USB device for removal
Stopping the device before removal mainly applies when write caching is set. in that case, windows will write all cache to disk before stopping the device. Is far less likely to cause problems if windows is applying writes one-at-a-time as they occur.

4. This is an issue for both NTFS and FAT32. Maybe a bit more so for NTFS
Because NTFS tends to do more writes to the disk. So greater chance of problems if things get interrupted

Control your options be selecting a disk drive in device manager, rt click Properties, click Policies. Set the options. Also see this.
 
D

DelJo63

With Fat32 you unplug and plug at will. In fact you might have to disable quick remove to format NTFS
never never never unplug without stopping the device -- unless you like to reformat it
due to partition corruption.
 

gguerra

Posts: 314   +0
gguerra

Just re-read in more detail your earlier post. I think you're mixing up different issues

1. Write caching.
You can get better disk performance if you enable write caching for a disk drive. This means Windows caches several disk writes together in cache before it physically writes it all to the drive. If you set a drive for no caching Windows will perform each write to the drive as they are issued. one-at-a-time

2. Write caching can give better performance.. but can also give headaches
Problem with write caching is if Windows crashes or you unplug a USB drive there are several writes that never make it to disk. This can cause file and file system corruption depending on what it was not getting written.

3. Stopping a USB device for removal
Stopping the device before removal mainly applies when write caching is set. in that case, windows will write all cache to disk before stopping the device. Is far less likely to cause problems if windows is applying writes one-at-a-time as they occur.

4. This is an issue for both NTFS and FAT32. Maybe a bit more so for NTFS
Because NTFS tends to do more writes to the disk. So greater chance of problems if things get interrupted

Control your options be selecting a disk drive in device manager, rt click Properties, click Policies. Set the options. Also see this.

Somebody needs to re-read.. I am not the one with the problem I am only offering suggestions which may or may not be helpful. The original poster is aznn3rd and since we have not heard from him we may all be wasting our time.;
 
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