Samsung's 512GB HKMG-based DDR5 is fast and efficient

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,170   +132
Staff member
In brief: HKMG has traditionally been used in logic semiconductors. As DRAM structures continued to scale down and the insulation layer thinned, leakage started becoming an issue. By replacing the insulation layer with HKMG material, Samsung said its DDR5 can reduce leakage and push performance to new heights.

Samsung has developed what it claims is the industry’s first 512GB DDR5 module based on High-K Metal Gate (HKMG) process technology.

At up to 7,200 megabits per second (Mbps), DDR5 delivers more than twice the performance of existing DDR4. It’ll also consume roughly 13 percent less power, making it even more desirable in environments where efficiency is paramount.

In the case of this particular 512GB module, Samsung is using through-silicon via (TSV) tech to stack eight layers of 16Gb DRAM chips.

This isn’t the first time Samsung has worked with HKMG material. In 2018, the South Korean tech giant used it in GDDR6 memory.

For now, DDR5 is being positioned as the next step for cloud-based data centers, networks and edge deployments. According to Samsung, it’ll be well-equipped to handle high-bandwidth workloads in artificial intelligence, machine learning, supercomputing and data analytics applications.

Samsung is currently sampling different variations to customers for verification and certification. DDR5 for high-performance desktops is still pending and might not arrive until later this year, or sometime in 2022, according to leaked roadmaps.

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 4,894   +5,435
My Next Computer will be DDR5 with the appropriate motherboard. SSD only, The best GPU available (4090?) and liquid cooling.

Very anxious to see the gains over DDR4.
 

VitalyT

Posts: 5,555   +5,231
512GB - that's great! Unfortunately, both AMD and Intel purposefully cap all general-consumer chipsets to just 128GB, to make sure that premium buyers would have to go for a way more expensive chipset and CPU. In that regard, AMD and Intel still share the same evil streak.
 

Reehahs

Posts: 1,196   +824
512GB - that's great! Unfortunately, both AMD and Intel purposefully cap all general-consumer chipsets to just 128GB, to make sure that premium buyers would have to go for a way more expensive chipset and CPU. In that regard, AMD and Intel still share the same evil streak.

If you are the sort of consumer who needs more RAM than 128GB, would you really be benefiting from consumer grade hardware?
 
If you are the sort of consumer who needs more RAM than 128GB, would you really be benefiting from consumer grade hardware?

I used 24GB as a RAM disk. When compiling Linux kernel, it cuts 7 to 8 minutes of compiling time when using RAM disk vs SATA3 HDD. Also no write wear issue to worry about with RAM disk vs SSD.
 

BadThad

Posts: 503   +488
I expect we'll see a lot more news on DDR5 coming over the next few months with Gen12 Intel CPU's on the horizon. I suspect 512MB modules will too small, most consumers will want 2, 4 or 8GB modules.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,877   +2,191
Staff member
I suspect 512MB modules will too small, most consumers will want 2, 4 or 8GB modules.
These are 512 GB DIMMs - I.e. substantially larger than those used in standard desktops. They're big even for their intended market.
 

quadibloc

Posts: 281   +170
512GB - that's great! Unfortunately, both AMD and Intel purposefully cap all general-consumer chipsets to just 128GB, to make sure that premium buyers would have to go for a way more expensive chipset and CPU. In that regard, AMD and Intel still share the same evil streak.
By the time that DDR5 comes out, perhaps the address space for consumer chipsets will be increased. In any case, 512 GB DIMMs are a premium-priced product, and I don't expect too many consumers will be looking for more than 128 GB for a few years yet.