SSD drive experience

joffmatteo

Posts: 11   +0
How long do you use your desktop with ssd? mine is kingston uv500 480gb and its broken for 3months of usage.I already submit it my supplier then need to wait for 3to4weeks replacement period. please tell your ssd experience
 

cliffordcooley

Posts: 12,476   +5,852
I've eight SSD purchases without failures.

1x OCZ Agility 3 60GB​
1x Axiom Signature III 60GB​
3x Samsung Evo 120GB​
1x Samsung Evo 250GB​
1x Mushkin Enhanced ECO2 240GB​
1x Silicon Power Ace A55 1TB​

The Silicon Power is a recent purchase though. I've less than two weeks usage on the drive. All other drives have been going strong for over two years.
 

joffmatteo

Posts: 11   +0
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  • #3
I will make your brand as a reference in my next ssd purchase. I believe those are durable,
thanks for the share.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,306   +1,374
Staff member
Like @cliffordcooley I've been using Samsung SSDs for a number of years now - currently have a 256 MB 850 Pro, and 512 MB 850 Evo and a 1 TB 850 EVO. I've been using the first and the last ones for 11 and 16 TB of writes respectively; both are still good and glitch free. Although I highly recommend Samsung SSDs above all others, I suspect you've just been unlucky with your Kingston one, as it uses Toshiba NAND chips (2nd/3rd largest NAND flash suppliers in the world). That said, Kingston's UV500 range was their first foray into 3D TLC NAND so it's possible that these could be on the glitchy side.
 

joffmatteo

Posts: 11   +0
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  • #5
Like @cliffordcooley I've been using Samsung SSDs for a number of years now - currently have a 256 MB 850 Pro, and 512 MB 850 Evo and a 1 TB 850 EVO. I've been using the first and the last ones for 11 and 16 TB of writes respectively; both are still good and glitch free. Although I highly recommend Samsung SSDs above all others, I suspect you've just been unlucky with your Kingston one, as it uses Toshiba NAND chips (2nd/3rd largest NAND flash suppliers in the world). That said, Kingston's UV500 range was their first foray into 3D TLC NAND so it's possible that these could be on the glitchy side.
it's my fault to get that model. I purchased that model without researching. I didn't investigate on what the specification inside. it's my fault and I'm very wrong about this. I thought all kingston model was durable.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,306   +1,374
Staff member
You honestly have just been unlucky. Toshiba is pretty much 2nd only to Samsung as the largest global NAND flash manufacturer, and they won't have reached that position by producing unreliable stuff. Kingston SSD products are usually very good, as are Samsung ones.
 

joffmatteo

Posts: 11   +0
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  • #9
You honestly have just been unlucky. Toshiba is pretty much 2nd only to Samsung as the largest global NAND flash manufacturer, and they won't have reached that position by producing unreliable stuff. Kingston SSD products are usually very good, as are Samsung ones.
wow,thank you for your enlightenment @neeyik . I will always look for nand flash samsung brand
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,065   +4,868
hi clifford, may I know if you had any info regarding crappy or glitchy ssd brand model so I will be aware about purchasing next time?
IMO, you should "eliminate the middleman", so to speak, and buy a Samsung brand drive at the get-go.

Their migration software is worth the extra few dollars by itself. It allows foolproof transfer of your complete OS and programs in just a few minutes of work.

Other makes are less expensive, but many make you hunt for software to make the transfer, Accordingly, If I'm going to make a direct transfer, Samsung is what I buy.

If you're going to do a fresh install of the OS, then brand becomes less important

As Cliff says, anybody can get a bad SSD on occasion. I haven't experienced that as of yet. In fact, there is a PNY 125 GB drive in this machine, which I installed a couple of years ago. The box is up and running up to 12 hours a day, with no issues whatsoever.

Running disk defragmentation constantly supposedly shortens the life of SSDs If you machine is doing so automatically, you should disable it.
 
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daveteauk

Posts: 24   +4
IMO, you should "eliminate the middleman", so to speak, and buy a Samsung brand drive at the get-go.

Their migration software is worth the extra few dollars by itself. It allows foolproof transfer of your complete OS and programs in just a few minutes of work.

Other makes are less expensive, but many make you hunt for software to make the transfer, Accordingly, If I'm going to make a direct transfer, Samsung is what I buy.

If you're going to do a fresh install of the OS, then brand becomes less important

As Cliff says, anybody can get a bad SSD on occasion. I haven't experienced that as of yet. In fact, there is a PNY 125 GB drive in this machine, which I installed a couple of years ago. The box is up and running up to 12 hours a day, with no issues whatsoever.

Running disk defragmentation constantly supposedly shortens the life of SSDs If you machine is doing so automatically, you should disable it.
A good point to mention defragging, or Disk Optomisation as it's now called. I believe it should NEVER be done on any SSD. Almost all SSD's, and M.2 drives have their own software, often called trimming, which does similar things, but defragging - NO never.