Steven Spielberg looks to ban Netflix titles from the Oscars

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

Spielberg last year said that Netflix films are simply TV movies, meaning they should contend for Emmy awards rather than Oscars. “I don’t believe films that are just given token qualifications in a couple of theaters for less than a week should qualify for the Academy Award nomination,” he said at the time.

It appears that the Schindler's List director has a plan to make his wish come true. IndieWire reports that Spielberg will propose rule changes at the Academy's Board of Governors meeting in April, which would ensure the likes of Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu aren’t eligible for Oscar contention.

“Steven feels strongly about the difference between the streaming and theatrical situation,” said an Amblin spokesperson. “He’ll be happy if the others will join [his campaign] when that comes up [at the Academy Board of Governors meeting]. He will see what happens.”

Netflix’s Roma had the equal-highest number of nominations (ten) at the recent Academy Awards. It won three Oscars and some believe it should have beaten Green Book in the coveted Best Picture category. But critics have complained about Roma’s huge marketing budget, limited theatrical release window, and the fact Netflix doesn’t report box office earnings.

Many within the industry aren’t happy at the potential rule change. Not only could it see great films made by streaming services missing out on accolades, but it could also hurt smaller, independent movies.

Netflix gave an indirect response to Spielberg via a tweet, which lists some of the things it loves.

image credit: BAKOUNINE via Shutterstock

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xxLCxx

TS Addict
While the quality of movies has been overall decreasing to a point where they end up giving Oscars to “the best turds” among the pile, I can’t think of many Netflix productions that would have been Oscar worthy. Maybe “L'amica geniale” (My Brilliant Friend), but that’s a series.
Can you think of a price worthy Netflix movie?
 
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m4a4

TS Evangelist
Elitism in Hollywood? No way!

The funny thing is, one of the few Netflix movies that I've seen so far has become one of my favorites (called "The Fundamentals of Caring"), as it had an unexpected humor to it (and was well done). It would certainly beat a lot of the crap coming out of Hollywood these days...
 

Hexic

TS Evangelist
How about Oscars are a waste of time? I am guessing that this is probably an unpopular opinion but it is mine.
All video AND music award ceremonies have been irrelevant for some time, IMO. By and large, the garbage put out there doesn't deserve my time. And the content that does (mostly musically in my experiences) isn't even mentioned.

I'll let them ride their high horse with declining viewership, no skin off of my back.
 

RaXoR

TS Addict
While the quality of movies has been overall decreasing to a point where they end up giving Oscars to “the best turds” among the pile, I can’t think of many Netflix productions that would have been Oscar worthy. Maybe “L'amica geniale” (My Brilliant Friend), but that’s a series.
Can you think of a price worthy Netflix movie?
To me, this seems like a man who feels threatened by competition because netflix is gradually getting better and better at production quality. Netflix overall puts out amazing shows and many great movies in my opinion.
 
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xxLCxx

TS Addict
Elitism in Hollywood? No way!

The funny thing is, one of the few Netflix movies that I've seen so far has become one of my favorites (called "The Fundamentals of Caring"), as it had an unexpected humor to it (and was well done). It would certainly beat a lot of the crap coming out of Hollywood these days...
I'm gonna give this a try, despite (or maybe because) the "critics' reviews" on MetaCritic appear to kick it down.
 
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wiyosaya

TS Evangelist
Yet another worthless opinion from another Hollyweird arrogant dolt!

EDIT: I read another article on this that stated that Speilberg thinks that movies must be seen in the movie theater to fully experience the movie. Apparently, he has not attended a showing with the regular public with fidgety children, people on their cell phones, noise from adjacent theaters, poor audio, floors covered with never-cleaned-up spilled pop, and any other bother that makes the movie theater experience total :poop: these days.

Then again, maybe he thinks that the :poop: theater experience IS the theater experience these days.
 
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