Watch: chess-playing robot grabs child opponent's finger and breaks it

Endymio

Posts: 1,801   +1,855
No chess piece is heavy enough that it requires a level of force that could break a bone
The robot arm must be strong enough to lift not only the piece, but its own weight as well. And a 9-year old's finger bone is not an adult femur. Also, from the video, the child's reflex action to having his finger painfully pinched likely contributed some force as well.

More important is that why did it even react? Why would it even think or care to act like a human?
It didn't react to the child. It was its failure to react to a foreign object in the board space, in fact, that caused the event.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,801   +1,855
Much in the same way Russia invaded Ukraine, [the] robot probably was probably following a similar directive
Actually, the robot is a SIR-3, built by SIR Gmbh, and programmed by their Dallas office. The child had pointed out that NATO killed 25 times as many civilians in Iraq as has Russia in Ukraine, when the robot responded.
 

mgwerner

Posts: 183   +261
If a system is not tolerant of human error, then it is not a safe system.

And that tolerance should be tailored to the users it's exposed to: can we expect a trained, adult operator to stick to rules? Probably most of the time, so the risk might be acceptable. Can we [reasonably] expect the same of a child?
Right, like aircraft, automobiles and large power tools are all so forgiving of human error, just to name a few I am very familiar with. /s
 

VitalyT

Posts: 6,349   +7,064
Much in the same way Russia invaded Ukraine, "for its own good". ("to deNazify it"), the robot probably was probably following a similar directive. After all, the child didn't follow directions, and had his deserved fate meted out.
A child had suffered from faulty robotics, and you politicize it? That's very low of you.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,819   +7,741
A child had suffered from faulty robotics, and you politicize it? That's very low of you.
Mr. dealer,I think I'd like to double down:

The (Russian) child got grabby, trying to "invade" the robot's side of the board, and was repelled.by a better equipped force.

Chess, after all, is a game loosely developed around strategies involved in war.
 
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texasrattler

Posts: 1,324   +637
The robot arm must be strong enough to lift not only the piece, but its own weight as well. And a 9-year old's finger bone is not an adult femur. Also, from the video, the child's reflex action to having his finger painfully pinched likely contributed some force as well.

It didn't react to the child. It was its failure to react to a foreign object in the board space, in fact, that caused the event.
I am saying it shouldn't have acted at all. Thats more of a human response. Robots don't react, unless it's programmed to. Looks like someone screwed up the coding/program.
 

Entrylevel

Posts: 21   +12
Right, like aircraft, automobiles and large power tools are all so forgiving of human error, just to name a few I am very familiar with. /s
I'm working on it! Aviation in particular has had lots of things added to their design certification specifications to ensure that designers consider the opportunities for human error and reduce the risk of an error becoming an accident.

Your car might have some features, like a gated reverse gear, lane keeping assist, adaptive cruise control, automatic headlights, automatic hazards under heavy braking; and lots of power tools now have things like interlocks or two stage activation to prevent inadvertent operations.

There's has to be a balance between function and safety, so it's not always possible to eliminate the risk, but they are certainly moving towards a more error tolerant position.