Windows XP source code has spilled out onto the internet

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,215
The first Seawolf was launched in late 1989. But you're right about the Virginia class, that was first launched in 1999.
The hull of the first Seawolf was laid down in 1989. It wasn't launched until six years later.

You might find more modern computing on the newer Virginias, but I doubt the Seawolf have much more than floppies.
Oh certainly ... especially since SAC was using 70's-era 8-inch floppies to control nuclear missile launches until just last year. :)
 
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mbrowne5061

Posts: 1,791   +1,030
The hull of the first Seawolf was laid down in 1989. It wasn't launched until six years later.

Fair, but that still means its computers were likely closer to the ones from 1985 than the ones from 1995. I guess that was the point I was trying to make. The first 'USB thumb drive-compatible-by-design' sub in the US fleet will probably be the Columbia. And I'm betting none of the computer that interface with nuclear materials will have any kind of input beyond keyboard and mouse, maybe a touch screen (might be easier to waterproof a resistive touch screen than a mouse & keyboard. Maybe)
 

bobc4012

Posts: 135   +53
Interesting.

Do you know that for a fact / how did you get to that conclusion??
One reason is most of your DOS commands still work. Some of the code has probably been tweaked. The same for other APIs that can be used by applications. You just don't blow everybody out of the water by writing totally new I/Fs that force them to change and rewrite all their applications (at least the parts that I/F with the OS). Some changes to the underlying OS may introduce some minor hits on the APIs, but you try to keep that to a minimal as much as possible.
 

bobc4012

Posts: 135   +53
Vista... 7... 8... too many versions since then. I don’t think your 50% figure is accurate
Keep in mind, as he mentioned, the kernel would have fewer changes than say the desktop. I have old DOS programs that still run on Windows 10 (when it updates with a fix that doesn't crash my system or reset all my settings). If you ever wrote a commercial OS and provided new releases and bug fixes, you would understand. A total rewrite of everything presents a lot of problems - more bugs, more code to maintain, costlier to change what is working as required. Keep in mind, there are millions of lines of code. A good programmer will try to obtain as much modularity as possible (unless you are writing a RT OS). There are a lot of factors.
 

bobc4012

Posts: 135   +53
How would this be any different of a security issue than having Linux source code? Yeah, easier to exploit at first, but in the long run, vulnerabilities should be known and fixed.
While you don't have the entire world perusing Linux code, there are enough who do - probably many, many more people that MS has inspecting their own code. While you may always have something slip through the cracks, you do have some good programmers out there who will catch those things. With Windows, the only people who see the source are its work groups that have a need and others who MS has agreed they have a need to know. BTW, the "bad guys" don't need the source as they already disassembled modules years ago. The only thing the source will do is confirm their "reverse engineering".