Lokitorrent taken down by MPAA

By Derek Sooman on February 12, 2005, 7:18 PM
It looks like Lokitorrent, who were doing a cracking job of raising money to fight the MPAA in court, have been shut down. Here's the message showing on their site:

There are websites that provide legal downloads. This is not one of them.
This website has been permanently shut down by court order because it facilitates the illegal downloading of copyrighted motion pictures. The illegal downloading of motion pictures robs thousands of honest, hard-working people of their livelihood, and stifles creativity. Illegally downloading movies from sites such as these without proper authorization violates the law, is theft, and is not anonymous. Stealing movies leaves a trail. The only way not to get caught is to stop.




User Comments: 26

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Electrick Gypsy said:
I always thought the U.S. legal system was a bit of a joke.They're just proving it to the rest of the world now.
Phantasm66 said:
I really didn't think that this would happen so fast. One day it was there, the next day it was gone.Oh well, time to start using eXeem everyone!
Julio said:
It's not like I'm in favor of RIAA or MPAA actions but we all know downloading stuff from that site or suprnova was illegal. Now the real problem I see as a consumer is that with these sites being shut down we lose yet another way to protest about high prices being forced on us for buying music or movies, that's a billionaire business that is not getting much better with time (I personally hate pop music puppets) and is one of the few businesses that despite of the increasing demand and revenues do not drop prices accordingly, etc.
Phantasm66 said:
Yes, it IS illegal, I should have said that.I don't think any of this is right, though. Its almost exactly what happened when movie companies tried to get the video recorder banned - the difference is, back then courts were on the side of consumers. Now, they are on the side of big business.I don't believe that P2P will die, rather I think that client program s like exeem will take over, removing the need in the end for actual websites. Then, the software might become open source and get mutated and spread, until its not stoppable any more. As for this technologies from Microsoft and the like, to make mp3s expire or become invalid in different machines, these things will be cracked just as DVD copy protection, Content scramble systems and all that jazz were of course cracked. It will not take long.P2P sharing of media will NEVER stop. Its the big businesses that need to change THEIR business models to make this problem go away. I know its not the solution either, but there's no going back now for mass media. The internet has changed it, and things like iTunes and stuff are only the beginning.[Edited by Phantasm66 on 2005-02-13 05:43:08]
Spike said:
So I've read, it turned out that the site owner settled for a fine of $1 million. Ouch! I'd hate to think what the fine would be if he hadn't settled!Apparently, he has also been ordered to hand over the server logs to the MPAA. How much of it is speculation and paranoia I don't kno. but it might be a little worrying if true for anyone who's downloaded from lokitorrent.[Edited by Spike on 2005-02-13 11:07:21]
Mikael said:
The RIAA and MPAA are adapting new ways to allow users to acquire movies and music, but they simply aren't doing it fast enough. A lot of people realize that a service like iTunes, where you pay $.99 a track, really is a rip-off. Why in the world would I want to spend $3.00 for three songs, when it is still just easier using a P2P program, or a site like [url]http://www.allofmp3.com[/url] to get the files?
Phantasm66 said:
Yes, iTunes is a rip off.Its kind of progressive, but its still a rip off.So will be this Napster movie download thing as well.
Mictlantecuhtli said:
And what wouldn't be a rip-off?Do you really think music and movies should be free?Or should the people who have made them get revenue only from theaters and concerts?
Phantasm66 said:
Oh, I'd say about 20 cents per track.3 older movies for $1.Only new movies at $1 each....OR, WHAT I WOULD REALLY PREFER:To pay a flat rate to download whatever the hell I liked.
son of sam said:
theres not a snowballs chance in hell that they'll make movies that cheap. if a single song is basically a dollar, a movies gonna be way more. a movie is basically a 2 hr long music video, but movies make more money and less music and most dont kick as much ass as a led zeppelin album or freebirdI Like the flat rate idea. for music movies and games[Edited by son of sam on 2005-02-13 12:25:30]
Mikael said:
"Do you really think music and movies should be free?" Not at all. I am more than willing to drop money on a new CD, but I don't like that the record company supporting the artist is the one making the lion's share of the money. As long as the RIAA continues to shun new technology that will cut into their profits, I will NOT buy a music CD from a record company that is a member of the RIAA. Before they started suing music fans, I had no problem going to the store on a weekend and picking up a couple of CD's that I like.Movies shouldn't be that cheap, but there certainly should be a fair price for them. I am kind of surprised the MPAA is taking the battle against piracy so seriously. Only because you can get DVD screeners off the Internet, but it is usually a pain to get it to actually play on a DVD player.
Nic said:
Maybe some independent body should regulate prices for these things so that users don't get ripped off...they are now commodities much like gas and electricity...ok, maybe not...
Mictlantecuhtli said:
Movies could be cheaper if the performers (and even directors) wouldn't be demanding millions from them.Oddly enough, the costs of making a movie don't show up in DVD prices. A movie that cost $100M to make would still cost the same as $1M movie on DVD.I wonder why?
Phantasm66 said:
[b]Originally posted by son of sam:[/b][quote]I Like the flat rate idea. for music movies and games[/quote]Yes, that's the best idea that I can think of.If there was no limit, and I got good, guarenteed quality, I would pay a flat rate even equal to what I pay for the cable modem (about 20 per month)
Nic said:
You mean...Rented music may seriously threaten iPod[url]http://www.techspot.com/story16935.html[/url]
phantasm66 said:
Well, what I mean here is more like paying a flat rate to obtain as much media of any type as I like, some of which may or may not have a limited life.
Nic said:
How would you divide up the royalties to the artists concerned? The more you download, the less they get...
Phantasm66 said:
The company keeps records of what is downloaded.More popular things get more share of the profits.Its not any more complex than that.
tc17 said:
[b]Originally posted by Julio:[/b][quote]It's not like I'm in favor of RIAA or MPAA actions but we all know downloading stuff from that site or suprnova was illegal. [/quote]This is the false idea that the MPAA/RIAA tries to make people believe. Then society which knows little about computers believes what they hear the RIAA/MPAA say. Even the media is stupid enough to believe everything the MPAA/RIAA says, along with computer illiterate Judges.Everything on torrents, or any other file sharing program, is not all illegal. You can download many legal things from them, for example the huge Linux distributions. Which I have done quite a few times. Or even game demos. Its a very convieniant way to get files, all at one location and you just search for them, and everyone shares the bandwidth.The MPAA/RIAA are nothing but pure thugs, spreading outright lies.
phantasm66 said:
Look, I am not exactly happy about what has happened either, make no mistake.But face facts - it IS illegal MOSTLY! I have visited many of these sites, and it was like 90% illegal content. OK, I don't want to pay huge prices for DVDs and CDs, etc as well - I think that is a rip off. But everyone who used these things knew that it was illegal, and knew that it was going to end sooner or later when the MPAA closed in.Its crappy - believe me, I HATE it - but its a fact of life.
Julio said:
It should be clear that there's nothing wrong or illegal with downloading from a P2P application such as Bit Torrent but the fact that the shut down sites offered mostly pirated copies of software.
Phantasm66 said:
I am frightened to even tell you in this thread what the hell you are supposed to do to get bittorrents now....I dunno, try things like eXeem until they get shut down as well.......or brought back 2 years later as a commercial product with the same name and logos (i.e. napster)[Edited by Phantasm66 on 2005-02-14 16:02:40]
Spike said:
[b]Originally posted by Phantasm66:[/b][quote]I am frightened to even tell you in this thread what the hell you are supposed to do to get bittorrents now....[/quote]Why? does it involve a big scary something or other, is it incredibly complicated, or just a risk to post th information or to do it.Maybe private p2p clients are the way things will go, where small groups will share files between each other under protection of encryption and selective membership.I know that a number of clients for similar purposes are starting to emerge, and are being used in this way already.
Phantasm66 said:
Yes, in case some MPAA person reads it and then gets that shutdown too!
Spike said:
I did think that before I posted my last post on the subject of private p2p, but then, there's plenty of other places the MPAA could read it.A wise decision there P66[Edited by Spike on 2005-02-15 09:33:13]
Phantasm66 said:
Yeah, better watch you don't even publicly SUPPORT P2P, you might be getting arrested for that too.[img]http://www.secularhumanism.org/library/images/nazi-
riests.jpg[/img]
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