Pentium 4 performance lawsuit tossed out

By Justin Mann on December 3, 2007, 3:47 PM
You can speak to just about any techie and find they favor one processor over another. They all know, however, that anything coming out of either Intel or AMD's advertisements is going to be chock full of propaganda – after all, that's marketing. Everyone always claims to be the fastest in X or Y. We know that and accept that.

Such was not the case with the Pentium 4, or at least for one small group of people. They opted to take Intel to court because Intel's claims of performance boosts weren't quite factual. Then again, anyone who used the Pentium 4 through its various iterations remembers how dismal it was in the beginning. Was it really worth suing over? Now, years later, a judge has said no. Or, at least, he has said that a lawsuit against Intel for “misrepresenting” the speed of the Pentium 4 line shouldn't go forward, and cannot become a class action suit. The case ended up making it to the Supreme Court – where Intel found itself defending the technical performance of their processors. The case isn't over, but will not be as grandiose as the people attacking Intel had hoped.

With the Internet literally crawling with benchmarks and performance gauges before hardware is even officially released and common knowledge being that companies like Intel and AMD are trying to sell a product to you, a lawsuit of this nature seems utterly ridiculous. I for one side with Intel on this matter.




User Comments: 7

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canadian said:
Do you know what version of the P4 they got sued over?
bushwhacker said:
P4 EE, I believe.
link590o said:
suing over misrepresentation? that's like trying to take microsoft to court for misrepresenting Vista as being better than XP. it's a worthless and futile attempt. it's almost incredibly obvious that they were just trying to get money out of intel. companies "misrepresent" things all the time to bloat their figures. they use technicalities by using the median instead of the mean. it's common practice. is it worth suing over? HELL no. it's just business. if you want to sell it, make it look good. do you really say I Can't Believe It's Not Butter when you eat it? no. it's just a marketing ploy to make it sound tastier than it actually is. intel bloated their speed and performance figures a little.i'm with you on that one justin. intel deserves to win over those morons.
thrudd said:
And this is supposed to be an acceptable practise?We have slipped down the slippery slope back into the midden of the middle ages or at least a couple of centuries back into the days of the patent medicine and snake oil salesmen. Heh it used to be a term of derision but for some asinine reason (greed?) it is now acceptable business practise to Lie to the purchaser and then fall back on the defence of buyer beware, and these same people don't want government oversight armed with a big hammer.I say bring back the tar'n'feathering, railroading and similar responses to such successful business practises and their paid for supporters in the judiciary.
Soul Harvester said:
[b]Originally posted by thrudd:[/b][quote]And this is supposed to be an acceptable practise?We have slipped down the slippery slope back into the midden of the middle ages or at least a couple of centuries back into the days of the patent medicine and snake oil salesmen. Heh it used to be a term of derision but for some asinine reason (greed?) it is now acceptable business practise to Lie to the purchaser and then fall back on the defence of buyer beware, and these same people don't want government oversight armed with a big hammer.I say bring back the tar'n'feathering, railroading and similar responses to such successful business practises and their paid for supporters in the judiciary.[/quote]Caveat emptor. You cannot always rely on honesty to guide your purchases.
howzz1854 said:
you two both have good reasons. however, intel does need to rethink its ad campaign in the past iterations. before it's "gigahertz is everything, bigger the better", and then all of a sudden, they switch to "size doesn't matter" over night when the conroe is released. imagine someone buying a product only found out the day after, that the company has completely turned 180 degree and revoked its support (i do'nt mean physical support)P4 architecture is fundamentally a duck taped job. adding more pipelines version after version to cheat more megaherz out of it, does it increase performance? maybe, but that's like adding a bigger tank to cover the fact that your car gets 5 miles per gallon. in the end when they reached 40+ stages in their pipeline instruction flush started to hinder. that's when $hit hits the drain and they pulled their heads outta their @sses. even the previous P3 architecture was then found to be far more efficient and capable than the P4, therefore the core micro architecture that we all seem to love today, it's basically a revised/reinvented P3 core.
agenttexx said:
Its called "truth in advertising," not "spin the facts to fit their opinions and interests." A lawsuit will go a long way in helping to keep advertising honest. Consumers should educate themselves, but they shouldn't have to be intentionally misled by the company they are looking to for quality products.I don't feel at all sorry for a person who gets caught lying. So when a corporation does it, I don't feel sorry for them getting caught.The Truth will set you free. It's also easier to remember...
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