Newegg unveils Windows 7 OEM prices

By on September 29, 2009, 2:06 PM
Online retailer Newegg.com today unveiled prices for OEM editions of Windows 7, and as usual, they're significantly lower than the full and even upgrade retail versions. As you are probably aware, these licenses are intended for small-scale system builders, ban users from transferring the operating system from one PC to another, come with no support whatsoever, and only allows performing a clean installation.

If you don't mind those restrictions, however, there's nothing to prevent individual users from buying and installing an OEM version of Windows on their machines. So, if you missed the initial pre-order discount or don't qualify for the current student offer, going for an OEM copy of Microsoft's upcoming operating system may be the next best thing in terms of savings.

Specifically, Newegg priced the OEM edition of Windows 7 Home Premium at $110, nearly 50% off Microsoft's suggested list price of $200 for the full version and about 10% less than the $120 price of the same edition's upgrade. Other savings are available for Windows 7 Professional and Ultimate at $140 and $190, respectively, versus $300 and $320 for the full retail versions.

The online retailer is also offering pre-order prices that are $5 to $15 cheaper until October 20, which means a full copy of Windows 7 Home Premium OEM can be purchased for as little as $100.




User Comments: 31

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Guest said:

Why buy Windows when you can install Ubuntu OS for free from www(dot)ubuntu(dot)com? You just have to download the Iso file and burn a disc and presto, a free and open source operating system on your PC. No need to buy licenses and it's not shareware. That's the beauty of open source.

Guest said:

Right, I'm sure that makes perfect sense to all the Windows users reading. Instead of plunking down a small chunk of change for a quite nice operating system that works with the largest number of programs out there, go get one for free that works with nowhere near as many programs and chucks familiarity out the window (pun intended). And then they can go ask their friends for help and watch as all of them stare blankly back at them.

Staff
Julio Franco Julio Franco, TechSpot Editor, said:

OEM prices look good, but nothing like the upgrade discounts Microsoft offered earlier on. The Home Premium upgrade went for $50, hopefully they will offer something similar closer to launch next month.

Badfinger said:

Looking at a chart of features, to even get Windows XP mode, requires Pro or Ultimate version.

I'm assuming that if I went for the 64 bit version, pretty much all my old 32-bit games/apps are useless on it?

Guest said:

" Comes with no support whatsoever" ..what the hell does this mean? It doesn't update itself?

Who the hell wants that?

nazartp said:

Guest said:

" Comes with no support whatsoever" ..what the hell does this mean? It doesn't update itself?

Who the hell wants that?

No support means you will not get to call Microsoft and get an answer if something is wrong with Windows. You still get all patches, just do not get the service piece that comes with the software. OEM's get the discounts because they have their own support personnel to answer questions when your machine is malfunctioning. Microsoft will step in only when it is determined that the support request is escalated to Level III - means a piece of a code needs to be rewritten.

Guest said:

The best deal is the student discount which I qualify for. Nothing can beat the student discount of $30 for the Windows 7 Premium upgrade of either the 32bit or 64bit version.

spydercanopus spydercanopus said:

Thanks for the pre-order announcements you dicks.

Guest said:

Windows 7, 64 bit edition fully supports 32bit apps. I have been running it (RC 7100) since early May.

All 64 bit apps are installed under the default C:\Program Files folder.

All 32 bit apps are installed under: C:\Program Files (x86)

Of note: Windows 7 is by far the most stable and fastest Windows OS ever.

I used to have to reinstall Windows XP every 3 to 6 months as it bogged down over time.

Windows 7 doesn't seem to suffer this problem, Windows Updates detects all my driver updates. including the ATI full Catalyst suite, onboard Realtek sound drivers and so on. When I update my video drivers I am no longer required to reboot!

Although I never owned VISTA, I feel that anyone who did should get Windows 7 at a DEEP DISCOUNT due to the flawed product that VISTA was / is. I find it incredible that MS was able to come out with such a radically better OS so quickly after VISTA was released. They admit that VISTA sucked yet want people to pay corporate prices for this VISTA release update. The interface is identical to VISTA's, it's what's under the hood that has radically improved. Major stability, performance boost and lessened hardware requirements (less RAM anyways) :)

bigpygme said:

great comment, reflects my feelings and impressions precisely ... thanks

bigpygme said:

no. generally speaking, 32 bit programs run on 64 bit systems.

bigpygme said:

bigpygme said:

great comment, reflects my feelings and impressions precisely ... thanks

i was referring to the first GUEST post following the Ubuntu enthisiast's post ...

Guest said:

@Badfinger. That is simply not true, 64-bit Windows is perfectly capable of running 32-bit apps and games. The only thing that I can think of that is required to be 64-bit, is the drivers. I've been using 64-bit for a while now and the vast majority of code that I'm running is definitely 32-bit code.

Guest said:

The only thing you need to worry about are any 16 bit apps that you may still be running although XP mode solves almost all problems if you can't find any other workaround.

Guest said:

oem ftw! why would you buy oem and not know how to use it?

Guest said:

The difference is of course the $50 upgrade is just that...an upgrade, but the $100 OEM is the OS itself basically complete. The upgrade requires an OS to upgrade from.

IanDSamson said:

Microsoft is either scraping the bottom of the barrel here, or W7 is hitting the shelves as buggy as every other OS they have produced. Jokes aside, the beta was very good and I am looking forward to the released OS. I hope the "buy 1 get 2 free" license offer still exists. Just hope they have straightened out the ultra-complex security from Vista and made it as easy as Windows 2000 was, otherwise there is going to be major hassles getting W7 machines talking to other OSes.

mailpup mailpup said:

Looking at a chart of features, to even get Windows XP mode, requires Pro or Ultimate version.
Keep in mind Windows 7 still has the compatibilty mode feature that XP and Vista had which isn't the same as this Windows XP mode feature.

Guest said:

Win7's been getting a great deal of promotion, it would be unfortunate to see it not live up to its promise. Price is one thing - performance is another. Windows hasn't been up-to-par, and I think that' pretty evident to every OS X and Linux user.

Back when I was using Debain and Windows, 6-7 years ago, I could see the anti-linux argument. Linux lacks compatibility & user-friendliness they said, and it did. But download yourself a copy of the new Ubuntu (Karmic Koala) and you'll see just how exponentially linux has progressed in the past five years or so.

What really caught me off-guard was having only a mac for a weekend (my XP laptop had an hdd issue). It was astonishing. I soon found myself buying a Macbook and learning all about it.

The stability and power of a unix based operating system with compatibility, design and stealth all-in-one? Damn. And I used to be a Windows guy.

This is why I conclude that those who are Windows fanatics likely haven't experimented much, and often don't really know all that much about operating systems, their history and architecture.

fletchoid said:

Ubuntu is great for a home user emailing, surfing etc, as long as you are not a gamer, or want to transfer work to and from your workplace. Sure, Open Office can save in Microsucks format, but you lose some formatting and fonts if you are going back and forth to work with things. So, realistically, Ubuntu is only a solution for a few people. I have it installed on all my computers, but need Windows for games. Linux fanboys need to realize that Linux does not cover every circumstance. I wish it did, but it doesn't. Reality sucks.

fletchoid said:

Sure, Macs can do all the workplace things Windows does, but mainly because they can run Windows. So why pay way more for a computer with OSX, and then install Windows anyway? Why not just use a Windows machine for a lot less money, and you can game too. Oh, right, Mac can play 3 or 4 games, I forgot, Myst, WOW, uhm....tetris... uhhh Myst.....

Guest said:

Quote:

Guest

on October 1, 2009

9:42 PM

Of note: Windows 7 is by far the most stable and fastest Windows OS ever.

I used to have to reinstall Windows XP every 3 to 6 months as it bogged down over time.

Unquote.

What the F are you doing to get XP not working properly every 3-6 months? I work in IT for a living and am probably old enough to be your father. However even to be blunt even the DUMBEST uneducated consumer out there would have a very hard time doing what you claim. What you say you are doing is lazy and pathetic showing you are very stupid if you can screw things up that badly that fast.

Vista = steaming pile of crap.

W7 = same steaming pile with some added polish. It's MUCH better don't get me wrong but it's still kissing Hollywood's *** etc etc. Pathetic that M$ went that way.

As for Ubuntu etc.. it's excellent overall and improving for games. And it's easily good enough for the majority of ppl with at least some common sense. However it is not quite ready to replace winbloze for everyone. Ultimately for it to go further it needs more Game support from companies such as iD.

Tedster Tedster, Techspot old timer....., said:

Because linux isn't user friendly and cannot run most popular software designed for windows.

Kcircyrd said:

The switch over to Linux or Debian or any other platform is just as troublesome as it sounds.

Nobody has the time it takes to install and learn a new system... and troubleshoot the inevitable problems.

herr5407 said:

As for Ubuntu etc.. it's excellent overall and improving for games. And it's easily good enough for the majority of ppl with at least some common sense. However it is not quite ready to replace winbloze for everyone. Ultimately for it to go further it needs more Game support from companies such as iD.

If linux had better support from hardware manufacturers, it would be linux FTW. But since drivers are lacking, etc, and manus continually create for the predominant market (why wouldn't you, you risk bankrupcy if not), Linux will always be a small market share.

For example, my PC right now can't boot any of the new linux distros. I don't even know why but searching the Ubuntu forums it has something to do with Intel chipsets. People rag on Windows for creating bad products. Other companies do to, but if the market share isn't as large not as many people will notice.

Considering that the entire Intel chipset is somewhat hooped on ubuntu right now, if Windows did that the linux fanboys would be burnin em. Take a dose of your own medicine. linux is the end all. I wish it was because I get sick of Windows considering I've been in an IT support role for the last 8 years.

Guest said:

I don't know. I'm pretty much sick of having to upgrade or install a new OS often. Just so noone is disappointed I'm making this announcement ahead of schedule.

"Microsoft is ceasing support of Windows 7 in the near future. hehe. So you can buy the latest and greatest Mindows 8. Plastic dog whistle & cat bell included. rofl. - Realistic Joke as I check my wallet for next year(s) expense to buy a supported OS and considering whether or not I really need the support or a new OS."

--------------------

Anyways, according to NetworkWorld, Windows 7 (couple hundred bucks) based on the Vista Core, is meant to be a compliment to Microsoft's Server 2008 (few thousand bucks), and some other 'virtual backup system software' (MLSP - Multiple Layered Server Protection or something; $12k+) geared toward corporate systems. (Approximate cost for the three packages $24k - $32K). Microsoft is also selling their own server unit (approx. cost $200k - $300k).

The Windows XP mode is meant to ease transition to Windows 7 for current XP users, so they can use some software that work with Windows XP. The Windows 7 upgrade unfortunately will not work well from Windows XP to Windows 7. So don't buy the upgrade if you're using Windows XP (unless you really want to - noone's going to stop you). There hasn't been much of a success story for upgrading Windows XP to Windows 7 (too many bugs and other problems), accept from clean installs of a full version.

The Windows XP mode support will eventually be phased out after the transition of Windows 7. There's another transitional software package (TSP) that must be purchased separately (more money) if you want to convert multiple corporate computers over to Windows 7 quick (full version install, not upgrade).

Computers that already have Vista installed can use the Windows 7 Upgrade with little to no problems. Software and hardware that already work with Vista will have no problems working with Windows 7.

The MLSP virtual backup side, runs dual computers with one on standby as a backup in the event of a system or computer crash (shutdown/whatever). The corporate server automatically switches from the crashed systems to the backup systems without having to reboot or without requiring a boot to keep the corporate services up and running seemlessly.

The advent of keeping a corporate server system up without having to reboot and doing a complete system transfer while Windows is active and live -- is a significant breakthrough that Microsoft came up with. As far as keeping Microsoft in the business game of servers and backup systems.

--------------------

Also, Microsoft may be jumping on the band wagon of free Office Software through 'cloud computing' by offering the Microsoft Live Package (free installs) in order to retain their customer base (online office crap - various companies).

I'm not going to go on about cloud computing. The concept of 'cloud computing' is to alleviate the software & hardware requirements at the user end. Such as no need for the user to have the physical computer storage and other devices - True Mobile Computing via telephony method and/or freeing up office/corporate/business building space, cutting rent costs, hardware purchase costs, etc.

I personally doubt this would really happen on a large scale, unless personal vehicles disappear from all major highways, and we're stuck with mass transport systems only. The only side I can see this happening with are some business', but not all, especially government systems and major corporations. Easier to downsize, liquidate, and/or move around.

There's also talk of who owns the virtual information and who controls it or how to control personal information from individual perspective of data ownership. From ownership control of online data (cloud computing) via encryption control, etc., where the physical storage device is no longer relevant to individual users. There currently aren't much laws covering virtual properties, so who knows where this stuff is going.

--------------------

The best example that comes to mind (comparison to cloud computing thing) is Second Life, which has a gross transfers of 15 million (U.S. Currency value 2008) per month between all participants and growing. The U.S. Congress has been trying to figure out how to create a law to tax this money, but the Second Life owners said they would just cross over the border and re-set up their servers within 72 hours if Congress attempts to pass such a law to tax Virtual Money. Even though Second Life's virtual money can be converted directly through the Corporate business for real currency when ever individual users want it.

The best joke that came to mind is Virtual Property Insurance, and considering how a person would go about making an insurance claim, in an event the servers crashed or whatever. Hi, I'd like to make an insurance claim for the loss of my imagination.

--------------------

Anyways, the rest of the tech world information only covers who bought whom out, market dominance by company/by tech devices, market share in competitive areas, all that other business stuff, security issues (internet explorer core & root-domain name probems with sub-domain name being treated as root-domain; IPv4 & IPv6 problems with tunnel embedding within each other bypassing firewalls & security; SSL middleman problems and fraud bank site), etcetera.

Guest said:

Why not install Ubuntu? Because I want to use a scanner. Full stop.

And while I'm at it, I'd like my video card to be able to use the hardware acceleration I bought it to do. I'd like to render a 3D object, like in the game Tux Racer, which has never, ever, ever worked for me because there are no video drivers that work properly. And I'd like to be able to use my hardware to its fullest.

I know it's not fair, but for things like gaming (real gaming, not Tux Racer) and for scanning anything at all, Ubuntu is not the right solution.

Guest said:

I am still using my vista 64 bit business os, no issues, stable as w7 and runs the same. I run w7 beta on my laptop, doesn't seem to be different to me. Vista works fine.

Kcircyrd said:

The proof is in the pudding. Most of our people do NOT have any problems with Windows VISTA... office and work desks seldom do. but when they do, they eat up a LOT of our time working out the problems. Engineering and computer folks seem to be smitten with most of the serious problems... which leads me to believe VISTA simply is not the robust program we expected.

Windows VISTA should have been more problem free than Windows XP Professional, after the upgrades, but it simply is not in our organization which has systems in several countries. I would expect that Windows 7 has the fixes that were learned in the battles to improve Windows XP Professional and Windows Workstation... VISTA certainly is not.

I worry that Windows 7 will also have the hidded problem areas found in VISTA... but it is certainly worth a try.

MACE12 said:

I'll vouch for unbuntu 9.10 karmic koala, it loaded right up on my old dell x300, even recgonized my sd card which no other os has done except the original dell version of xp. it also found my internal wireless card automatically and has real easy to use menus for setting up. install on an old 1.2 ghz with a gig of ram was under twenty minutes. i haven't had to load a single driver and haven't added anything except the auto updates for it since the release. its real easy to use like a mac.

i also have xp on my compaq laptop, which i use on a regular basis also. its what im used to hence the reason i predominatly use it. i hate vista always have, when a buddy asks for help i ask if they have vista and then tell them there's your problem

zero experience with windows 7 but hope it makes up for the abortion vista was. i can't afford any new software hence the reason i moved to linux. and i didn't have to use a cd to load it you can easily make a live usb with the iso and unetbootin on a flash drive and give it a test for yourself before you knock it.

SUSHRUKH said:

Looking at a chart of features, to even get Windows XP mode, requires Pro or Ultimate version.

I'm assuming that if I went for the 64 bit version, pretty much all my old 32-bit games/apps are useless on it?

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