Nokia switches to Windows Phone as primary smartphone platform

By on February 11, 2011, 8:06 AM
As rumored, Microsoft and Nokia have announced a broad strategic partnership to create a new global mobile ecosystem that includes market-leading mobile products and services designed to benefit consumers, operators, and developers alike. The two are promising rapid time to market execution as well as completely new service offerings, while extending established products and services to new markets, collaborating on joint marketing initiatives, and sharing their development roadmap for mobile products.

To be more specific, Nokia is adopting Windows Phone as its principal smartphone strategy, contributing its expertise on hardware design and language support to help bring the platform to a larger range of price points, market segments, and geographies. For example, Nokia's extensive operator billing agreements will make it easier for consumers to purchase Nokia Windows Phone services in countries where credit card use is low.

If Windows Phone is number one for Nokia, you might be wondering what happens to its other mobile OSes. Symbian will become a franchise platform, leveraging previous investments to harvest additional value; after all, there is an installed base of 200 million Symbian owners. Nokia expects to sell approximately 150 million more Symbian devices in the years to come. MeeGo, on the other hand, will become an open-source mobile operating system project with increased emphasis on longer-term market exploration of next-generation devices, platforms, and user experiences. Nokia still plans to ship a MeeGo-related product later this year (we think it's their tablet).

Additionally, Nokia's devices and services will have their search powered by Bing and their advertising services powered by Microsoft adCenter, although Nokia Maps is not going away – it will simply be integrated with the two. On the developer side of things, Microsoft's development tools will be used to create applications to run on Nokia Windows Phones, while Nokia's content and application store will be integrated with the Windows Phone Marketplace.

The link in the video above suggests that you go and read the Open Letter from Nokia CEO Stephen Elop and Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. We've reposted it below for your convenience:

Today in London, our two companies announced plans for a broad strategic partnership that combines the respective strengths of our companies and builds a new global mobile ecosystem. The partnership increases our scale, which will result in significant benefits for consumers, developers, mobile operators and businesses around the world. We both are incredibly excited about the journey we are on together.

While the specific details of the deal are being worked out, here’s a quick summary of what we are working towards:

  • Nokia will adopt Windows Phone as its primary smartphone strategy, innovating on top of the platform in areas such as imaging, where Nokia is a market leader.
  • Nokia will help drive and define the future of Windows Phone. Nokia will contribute its expertise on hardware design, language support, and help bring Windows Phone to a larger range of price points, market segments and geographies.
  • Nokia and Microsoft will closely collaborate on development, joint marketing initiatives and a shared development roadmap to align on the future evolution of mobile products.
  • Bing will power Nokia’s search services across Nokia devices and services, giving customers access to Bing’s next generation search capabilities. Microsoft adCenter will provide search advertising services on Nokia’s line of devices and services.
  • Nokia Maps will be a core part of Microsoft’s mapping services. For example, Maps would be integrated with Microsoft’s Bing search engine and adCenter advertising platform to form a unique local search and advertising experience.
  • Nokia’s extensive operator billing agreements will make it easier for consumers to purchase Nokia Windows Phone services in countries where credit-card use is low.
  • Microsoft development tools will be used to create applications to run on Nokia Windows Phones, allowing developers to easily leverage the ecosystem’s global reach.
  • Microsoft will continue to invest in the development of Windows Phone and cloud services so customers can do more with their phone, across their work and personal lives.
  • Nokia’s content and application store will be integrated with Microsoft Marketplace for a more compelling consumer experience.

We each bring incredible assets to the table. Nokia’s history of innovation in the hardware space, global hardware scale, strong history of intellectual property creation and navigation assets are second to none. Microsoft is a leader in software and services; the company’s incredible expertise in platform creation forms the opportunity for its billions of customers and millions of partners to get more out of their devices.

Together, we have some of the world’s most admired brands, including Windows, Office, Bing, Xbox Live, NAVTEQ and Nokia. We also have a shared understanding of what it takes to build and sustain a mobile ecosystem, which includes the entire experience from the device to the software to the applications, services and the marketplace.

Today, the battle is moving from one of mobile devices to one of mobile ecosystems, and our strengths here are complementary. Ecosystems thrive when they reach scale, when they are fueled by energy and innovation and when they provide benefits and value to each person or company who participates. This is what we are creating; this is our vision; this is the work we are driving from this day forward.

There are other mobile ecosystems. We will disrupt them.

There will be challenges. We will overcome them.

Success requires speed. We will be swift.

Together, we see the opportunity, and we have the will, the resources and the drive to succeed.





User Comments: 38

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Arris Arris said:

Think Android would have been the better path. I'm avoiding Windows Phone after having suffered 2 years of my HTC Touch HD with Windows Mobile 6.1 and no OS updates.

Call me distrustful but I have a hard time believing Nokia's decision to adopt Windows Phone has nothing what so ever to do with their new CEO Stephen Elop being ex-Microsoft.

Guest said:

Mayday, mayday,. ...... we are going down.

Bye Bye NOKIA.

nismo91 said:

somehow i think this is a good unprecedented move. so far people whom I know well, they chose nokia NOT because they want to customize it, but they want something simple, especially for tech-challenged people who only use phone to make and receive calls and text.

so far with my quick test on WP7 handsets at stores prove that WP7 is not difficult to use, easy big tiles of thumbnails and etc. just that I haven't see any non-touchscreen WP7.

of course, for those tech and gadget savvy guys, they didnt like WP7 much I guess.

Chazz said:

I'm definitely a tech guy and I'm quite fond of windows phone. Customizing for additonal features is nice and fun but I don't like having that required to instal fundamental things like OS upgrade. I would've picked a android phone if google were more strict about having manufactures update their devices with android updates.

Microsoft plans to add support for homebrew applications so, I feel windows would be the best choice for me.

Guest said:

Another bad move by Nokia. Android was the way to go.

treeski treeski said:

Arris said:

Think Android would have been the better path. I'm avoiding Windows Phone after having suffered 2 years of my HTC Touch HD with Windows Mobile 6.1 and no OS updates.

Call me distrustful but I have a hard time believing Nokia's decision to adopt Windows Phone has nothing what so ever to do with their new CEO Stephen Elop being ex-Microsoft.

You have to understand that Microsoft has taken a completely different direction with WP7. They are highly invested in the platform, so they have to keep continually updating it and supporting it. This new relationship with Nokia only shows you that Microsoft is in it for the long run. I'm not saying you should go out and buy a WP7 (I really don't care what you do), but I don't think you should completely disregard it.

Also... I sometimes wish Techspot would get rid of being able to post as guests. They are almost always complete trolls with nothing constructive to add.

hassaan said:

Nokia is a reputable company and choosing WP7 over Android is a strategy choice to differentiate themselves from all the dozens of cheap Android devices on the market.

They make low end and high end phones, Android runs like crap on low end devices and takes a lot of work to make a high end device look polished.

Arris Arris said:

but I don't think you should completely disregard it.

Maybe I will have a play with a WP7 before I make a decision but right now I'm keen on Android.

Jibberish18 said:

Microsoft and Nokia have become buddy buddy for a while now. Maybe that's why they chose WinPhone7, or maybe it's because the new CEO was previously Microsoft, OR because WinPhone7 is a much more closed and strict system than Android and EVERYONE is doing Android OR because Microsoft has given Nokia apparently completely control to do what they want with WinPhone7. Could be anyone of these things. I'm glad to see it though. Legendary Nokia Hardware with a Simple New OS from Microsoft. I'd hit it.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Think Android would have been the better path.

Frankly, Android seems and feels like a cheap imitation of iOS despite some of its very good attributes; for once performance degradation which occurs overtime is just unacceptable, and I am not going to talk about other issues. Now leave out Nexus line which Google itself rolls out with the help of other manufacturers; the rest seems just 'okay' nothing special (except for hardware superiority), there are lots of performance /stability issues with it (just like all the other mobile OS around).

Now, WP7 seems to be a very solid foundation provided MS is serious about developing it into something competitive and then keep improving it. I've tried HD7 and newer Omnia recently; and I would have dumped Galaxy S in a heart beat had MS rolled out the promised update by now.

Having used Android for a while I am now more willing to agree with Apple and MS's decision to have tight control over their platforms; as it guarantees acceptable performance / better stability.

Guest said:

Well, if people want to buy Microsoft crap on a phone, good for them. I will not be one of those people.

Guest said:

Ha, Ha, every company tainted by Microsoft dies a slow death.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Ha, Ha, every company tainted by Microsoft dies a slow death.

Did Bill Gates steal your sheep or what ?

Jibberish18 said:

Archean said:

Ha, Ha, every company tainted by Microsoft dies a slow death.

Did Bill Gates steal your sheep or what ?

Either stole them or molested them.

HTC was tained by Microsoft for a long time and is still going strong. Just sayin.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Exactly, infact the supplier from whom I usually buy my cell phones, was telling me the other day that he has sold just about same number of HD7s as Galaxy S sets; and none of the former's customer returned with any issues whereas about 20% of Galaxy S buyers have came back; give you a reason to think about doesn't it.

Secondly, I just remembered something, and when Nokia roll out WP7 device carrying CBCD display (which is the best around at the moment surpassing the SAMOLED of Samsung), it would be interesting to see how it hold out against the competition.

Either stole them or molested them.

I wonder if that can be termed as 'sexual harassment' .......

Guest said:

Let the market play itself out.

princeton princeton said:

Archean said:

Think Android would have been the better path.

Frankly, Android seems a cheap imitation of iOS despite some of its very good attributes; for once performance degradation which occurs overtime is just unacceptable, and I am not going to talk about other issues. Now leave out Nexus line which Google itself rolls out with the help of other manufacturers; the rest seems just 'okay' nothing special (except for hardware superiority), there are lots of performance /stability issues with it (just like all the other mobile OS around).

Now, WP7 seems to be a very solid foundation provided MS is serious about developing it into something competitive and then keep improving it. I've tried HD7 and newer Omnia recently; and I would have dumped Galaxy S in a heart beat had MS rolled out the promised update by now.

Having used Android for a while I am now more willing to agree with Apple and MS's decision to have tight control over their platforms; as it guarantees acceptable performance / better stability.

I have a galaxy s and a nexus s. I haven't experienced performance degrade with either. Give evidence.

princeton princeton said:

Archean said:

Think Android would have been the better path.

Frankly, Android seems a cheap imitation of iOS despite some of its very good attributes; for once performance degradation which occurs overtime is just unacceptable, and I am not going to talk about other issues. Now leave out Nexus line which Google itself rolls out with the help of other manufacturers; the rest seems just 'okay' nothing special (except for hardware superiority), there are lots of performance /stability issues with it (just like all the other mobile OS around).

Now, WP7 seems to be a very solid foundation provided MS is serious about developing it into something competitive and then keep improving it. I've tried HD7 and newer Omnia recently; and I would have dumped Galaxy S in a heart beat had MS rolled out the promised update by now.

Having used Android for a while I am now more willing to agree with Apple and MS's decision to have tight control over their platforms; as it guarantees acceptable performance / better stability.

I have a galaxy s and a nexus s. I haven't experienced performance degrade with either. Give evidence. I also have the HD7 and I prefer my nexus because of the customization.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

The problem of degradation lies with one issue, that is Android not cleaning out memory even when one has closed the applications hence the need for task killer etc. and if one forgets to do this don't get shocked if in few hours time your battery has dropped 20% or so charge.

I haven't had chance to play with Nexus S, but with experience from Nexus One I am sure it will be much better than Galaxy S in these areas, because of one simple reason, it is being shipped by Google with 'pure' OS not like all those cooked roms other manufacturers come-up with.

Now to HD7, personally I don't like its screen so I have decided not to bother with it for now.

yRaz yRaz said:

I've had the opportunity to play with a few windows phones and am seriously looking at the LG quantum. I find the only people who don't like WP7 are people who've never tried it. Over the past 2 years I think Microsoft has been putting out better products, WP7 being one of them. It seems like people hate on MS just because it was cool back in the vista days. Grow up already and go out and try one for yourself. I find WP7 much more comfortable than Android or iOS. It's easy to navigate and the music player has iOS and Android beat by a long shot. Zune media player is great for syncing music. If you ever get the chance, play around with the mobile version of office, It's pretty powerful. WP7 is nothing like other windows mobile OS's

Microsoft has come a LONG way. You can expect the same quality from WP7 as you can from windows 7.

Jibberish18 said:

Archean said:

The problem of degradation lies with one issue, that is Android not cleaning out memory even when one has closed the applications hence the need for task killer etc. and if one forgets to do this don't get shocked if in few hours time your battery has dropped 20% or so charge.

I've actually heard that you SHOULDN'T use Advanced Task Killer. I forgot exactly how it works, but Android will drop programs from the memory as it needs fit I think? I really can't remember. I was only interested in Android for a couple of weeks while trying out an HTC Desire.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Thanks for adding the office bit yRaz, to be honest, Android's office compatible thing seems rubbish when I compare it with the MS Office found on WP7 devices (I believe one shouldn't be surprised at this anyway).

I don't know Jibberish but thank you for sharing the info, however, if I don't clean out the memory I suspect the phone would hardly last for 30-40 hours on one charge. I think despite a little performance hit, WP7 implementation of suspending applications when not in use is a brilliant idea which help improve battery life as well even if you forgot to close application in question.

Guest said:

Smart move by Microsoft to team with Nokia and give Windows Phone 7 a better global reach. I do not think Nokia will fare much better in the US unless consumers and analyst stop sweating everything Apple.

TheSyberGroup

princeton princeton said:

Archean said:

The problem of degradation lies with one issue, that is Android not cleaning out memory even when one has closed the applications hence the need for task killer etc. and if one forgets to do this don't get shocked if in few hours time your battery has dropped 20% or so charge.

I haven't had chance to play with Nexus S, but with experience from Nexus One I am sure it will be much better than Galaxy S in these areas, because of one simple reason, it is being shipped by Google with 'pure' OS not like all those cooked roms other manufacturers come-up with.

Now to HD7, personally I don't like its screen so I have decided not to bother with it for now.

Not true. Androids memory management is actually better than ios. A program will stop using memory. If you use a task killer it will kill the program but the program will restart. this causes it to use memory again. If you need more info head over to XDA devs.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I have not played around with iOS for more then few hours, so I am not really in position to talk about its memory management when compared with android. The task killer I'm using only kills 'programs' which i select to be killed once I've closed them. For example I just checked that which programs are still running which I've closed after use, and right now wifi manager which I closed hours ago is still running in background. And as I've mentioned in my earlier post the blame is not entirely with the OS, it is with the way android is being handled or rather not handled by Google, I believe if they take control and set certain conditions/quality standards to maintain performance/stability things can improve.

taimuraly taimuraly said:

Nokia always does have good devices but their OS was very poor. Their devices are powerful with great hardware and suit different customers and segments. Microsoft's new OS looks good and now having Nokia making the hardware, the new devices Microkia (had to say it XD) will make will be able to give stiff competition to Google and Apple. However this move also effects the current manufacturers of Widows Mobile phones as now they have a new bigger mobile maker also making what they make.

Guest said:

Honestly this sounds like a deal for Microsoft rather than Nokia....

Microsoft gets Nokia a company that sells Half a Billion Phones a Year to install Microsofts OS...

Microsoft gets Nokia Maps;

Microsoft gets the OVI Store

Microsoft gets Nokias Mobile Camera Technology / team....

Nokia gets Bing and a bland excrement of an OS that isn't even doing well on its own IN ITS HOME MARKET...

mosu said:

it's a natural choice for people who use Windows at home and/or at work to use a WP7 phone and yes, it's a simple interface to use.I'm expecting further developments.A minus though, Navteq maps for my country are crap

yRaz yRaz said:

Guest said:

Honestly this sounds like a deal for Microsoft rather than Nokia....

Microsoft gets Nokia a company that sells Half a Billion Phones a Year to install Microsofts OS...

Microsoft gets Nokia Maps;

Microsoft gets the OVI Store

Microsoft gets Nokias Mobile Camera Technology / team....

Nokia gets Bing and a bland excrement of an OS that isn't even doing well on its own IN ITS HOME MARKET...

Have you even seen a WP7 phone? I think a company that sells "half a billion phones a year" would know what's best for it's company. And WP7 is doing fairly well, where do you get your news? It certainly isn't here because there was an article a few weeks back talking about how well WP7 is doing.

Stupid trolling guests

princeton princeton said:

I have not played around with iOS for more then few hours, so I am not really in position to talk about its memory management when compared with android. The task killer I'm using only kills 'programs' which i select to be killed once I've closed them. For example I just checked that which programs are still running which I've closed after use, and right now wifi manager which I closed hours ago is still running in background. And as I've mentioned in my earlier post the blame is not entirely with the OS, it is with the way android is being handled or rather not handled by Google, I believe if they take control and set certain conditions/quality standards to maintain performance/stability things can improve.

I would ditch your task killer altogether. Cyanogen and Google have commented on how it's really useless.

[link]

Obviously it's just a suggestion. But a lot of us take Cyan's word as holy gospel when it comes to android.

taimuraly taimuraly said:

Have you even seen a WP7 phone? I think a company that sells "half a billion phones a year" would know what's best for it's company. And WP7 is doing fairly well, where do you get your news? It certainly isn't here because there was an article a few weeks back talking about how well WP7 is doing.

Stupid trolling guests

It does look like that Microsoft is gaining a lot as guest pointed. I think what Nokia is gaining is a way to enter the US market plus a new platform which is better supported by programmers. It will also save on R&D as it wont no longer need as many resources on creating, updating and supporting an OS. These are a few I could think of and as you pointed, "a company that sells half a billion phones a year would know what's best for it's company" although some my see it as drastic times call for drastic measures XD

MrAnderson said:

I agree with yRaz, a lot of people have been hating on MS and a lot of it is just word of mouth with out even having the "bad" experiences to draw from. Everyone is jumping on the MS is going down bandwagon and it is not really the case.

Yes MS has becoming less relevant as the market has grown and they have really good competition. But comptition is good. It forces everyone to change for the better and well if you cannot you go away.

MS is still alive and kicking (for the for the foreseeable future) and they are both innovating and able to pissing people off with some of there decisions... moreover, they still are working to correct those things.. caugh caugh Vista... caugh caugh Windows 7 (even thought Vista was another word of mouth thing compared to how bad it really really was) So no so called official drop in browser market share can really tell the pulse of any company (especially when they have other things going for them). It just makes for sesational news articles that get good chaps like use commenting.

The only immediate negative thing about MS and Nokia coventure will be the terrible loss of employment for the Nokiain workforce. Also, possibly put a strain on the Finn government unemployment support system in the near future. I wish that all of the staff find new jobs and bounce back to creat more wonderful and innovative products where ever they end up. Who knows maybe MS, Google, and even Apple will take in a good portion of the Nokiain software engineers.

Cheers

Guest said:

Thats realy realy bad... picetures you got there

Mobile phones will all have micro usb as main plug... for charging and connecting to pc and earplugs..

So they must be a lie!

WINDOWS PHONE 7 + NOKIA = WIN > Apple and their iShit

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I've gone through the article you've linked in your post. Re-ran the tests I have done earlier as well, and results are same, Android doesn't clean out the **** left behind by closed programs in a 'timely/efficient' manner, leaving battery to loose about 2% of battery time per hour, and mind you I kept cell in 'flight mode'. Infact Google Skymap, Barcode Scanner, reader, wifi manager processes just kept running along with browser + music player. Now I am sorry, when I put this DV5 in 'sleep/suspend' it hardly consumes any power, making it much more efficient than the cell, whereas, it should be the other way round.

To further stress the OS I opened few more applications, and then tried to open the default task manager, which happily crashed straight away, hanged up the phone for about a minute, and when everything returned only browser was running and rest of the stuff disappeared from running processes list. So frankly, I standby with my experience of this device so far, I am not impressed by this device mainly due to implementation of android it came with, it may be that the whole experience has been ruined by Samsung, which probably is the most likely culprit here.

fpsgamerJR62 said:

As to whether Nokia has made the right choice by entering into a partnership with Microsoft and adopting Windows Phone 7, only time will tell but the game has definitely changed in the mobile phone market with this development. One thing that Microsoft has failed to do in the first wave of WP7 handsets is to address the market for midrange devices. I am hoping that this partnership with Nokia will eventually produce midrange WP7 handsets which would help broaden WP7's user base. I'm quite sure that Nokia can pull this off since they've already done this with Symbian, first coming out with high-end handsets only but eventually putting Symbian in entry-level phones.

mrmelty said:

Call me distrustful but I have a hard time believing Nokia's decision to adopt Windows Phone has nothing what so ever to do with their new CEO Stephen Elop being ex-Microsoft.

Agreed

PanicX PanicX, TechSpot Ambassador, said:

Archean said:

To further stress the OS I opened few more applications, and then tried to open the default task manager, which happily crashed straight away, hanged up the phone for about a minute, and when everything returned only browser was running and rest of the stuff disappeared from running processes list. So frankly, I standby with my experience of this device so far, I am not impressed by this device mainly due to implementation of android it came with, it may be that the whole experience has been ruined by Samsung, which probably is the most likely culprit here.

Add a 50% dropped call rate/20 hour battery life, and you've described my iPhone 3g

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