ARM, TSMC joint agreement to push chips into server market against Intel

By Lee Kaelin on July 25, 2012, 12:00 PM

ARM Holdings moved a step closer towards increasing competition with leading chipmaker, Intel, after announcing a multi-year agreement with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSMC) to produce low-power chips for mobile devices and servers.

The Cambridge-based firm’s chip designs dominate the smartphone and tablet markets, powering around 90% of devices currently sold. The agreement with TSMC will include the collaboration of technical details between both parties in order to produce higher yields, and designs more suited to the fabricators' manufacturing setups.

“This collaboration brings two industry leaders together earlier than ever before to optimize our FinFET process with ARM’s 64-bit processors and physical IP,” Cliff Hou, vice president of research and development for TSMC, said in the statement. “We can successfully achieve targets for high speed, low voltage and low leakage.”

TSMC’s FinFET technology is similar to Intel’s Tri-Gate transistor architecture as used in the 22nm Ivy Bridge line of processors, although the design differs by utilizing a Dual-Gate arrangement. Both are the result of over a decade of research into 3D transistor designs by both firms, although Intel was first to commercialize its version.

Once TSMC’s FinFET has been combined with ARM’s upcoming v8 64-bit chip design, it will provide ARM with the products to compete more directly against Intel in the server market, offering consumers highly efficient and low-power chips ideal for server deployment.




User Comments: 6

Got something to say? Post a comment
ikesmasher said:

aw man, I want some more competiton in the x86 consumer desktop market. not servers...

ragreeen2646 said:

I assumed they intend to compete in the LINUX server market, unless MS will port to there architecture.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

aw man, I want some more competiton in the x86 consumer desktop market. not servers...

You'll be waiting a damn long time. AMD's cross licence agreement with Intel means that AMD continues in it's present guise- change of ownership means loss of licence. The only other licencee is VIA. AFAIK, that leaves only x86 emulation/hardware virtualization by RISC processors...which is someway off as a comprehensive competitor.

mosu said:

Competing Intel, not against Intel.Competition is good for business.

Guest said:

I assumed they intend to compete in the LINUX server market, unless MS will port to there architecture.

Well, considering windows has less than half of the server market share...

TJGeezer said:

Competition is good for business.

Well... good for innovation, anyway, and consumers. It disrupts businesses, tears apart the most careful marketing plans and lays waste any current de facto or legislated monopolies. Most businesses would prefer no competition at all.

Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.