Xbox One enters mass production with a 150 MHz CPU speed boost

By on September 3, 2013, 9:51 PM

We're just a couple of months away from the launch of the Xbox One, and Xbox chief marketing officer at Microsoft, Yusuf Mehdi, has revealed that the console has entered full mass production. He also mentioned that final units will feature another speed boost, thanks to the hard work of the Xbox engineering team.

Mehdi revealed that the CPU inside the console's AMD-made APU has received a clock speed boost of 150 MHz, taking it from 1.6 GHz to 1.75 GHz. This follows news last month of a GPU clock speed increase, which brought the graphics processor up to 853 MHz from 800 MHz.

While the Xbox One has received some last minute performance boosts via clock speed increases, there are still areas of the system that will be inherently slower than Sony's PlayStation 4. Microsoft's console will still reportedly use 8 GB of DDR3 RAM for 63.8 GB/s of bandwidth, plus 32 MB of eSRAM for 108 GB/s of bandwidth, which is significantly slower than the PlayStation 4's GDDR5 memory with 170.6 GB/s of bandwidth.

The PlayStation 4's GPU is also theoretically up to 50% faster as it incorporates more shader processors: 1152 versus 768 in the Xbox One. While marginal clock speed boosts may have closed the gap in terms of performance differences, there still could be as much as a 600 GFLOPS differential in raw performance. However, with the majority of games coming from third-party developers, it's unlikely that gamers will notice the difference in performance of the next generation consoles; at least initially.

Microsoft has yet to announce specifically when the $499 Xbox One will launch, although it will happen sometime in November. Meanwhile, the PlayStation 4 will be available from November 15, priced at $399.




User Comments: 14

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1 person liked this | Guest said:

I don't like last minute tweaks to hardware, it makes me feel nervous. Then you say hmm did they the new tweaks enough, this could be disastrous!. Last minute tweaks? sigh, sigh.

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Interesting, either, they've learnt from the 360 that unreliable, hot, loud hardware gets you a severely bad reputation or they simply want a bit more from the hardware to better compete with the PS4. Either way, as long as it doesn't make it loud, this is probably a good move to make, Seems like they're a bit late to start mass production though, I mean they have 2 months to make enough consoles and ship them, no wonder they canceled in several country's.

1 person liked this | Guest said:

RROD Any one?

Scshadow said:

If I was the chief marketing officer for the Xbox One I wouldn't be boasting about post production clock increases. Yeah maybe if you are Sony with pretty decent track records on quality, I'd take that risk. But when almost everyone in the gaming community has known at least several people who have been through more xbox 360s then they can count on a single hand each, I find it in bad taste. That being said, they'd truly be fools if they didn't design their console with tolerance for additional heat. If not for a potential overclock, then at least in anticipation of high ambient temperatures or maybe inefficient cooling because of dust build up. Technologically I just don't see it being a real problem unless we do end up getting a highly inconceivable repeat of the Xbox 360, I just don't like marketing philosophy of boasting about it.

1 person liked this | ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I imagine that the reason for the upped specs is that the original ones were conservative and AMD and Microsoft now have final hardware and know the real tolerances.

Guest said:

I feel like the reason is than it wans't powerful enought, I mean, they anounce an increase of like 10%, at most, on the performance.

Guest said:

Oh lordy... I see a catastrophe ahead. What has SONY done to you M$oft?

Guest said:

It's just a PC built around DRM. Like paying someone to smash you in the face with a baseball bat.

Puiu Puiu said:

Sony has not yet mentioned anything about clock speeds. I'm sure that if MS can bump them up a bit then Sony can do the same.

Not sure about the GPU since it's much larger and probably will heat up too much and they don't want to do what MS did with the 360, but the CPU should be fairly cool if what I've read about it is true.

Low end CPU's do tend to produce less heat and sub 2GHz speeds aren't known to tax the heat sinks too much. (the reason why we are getting close to such speeds on phones and those CPUs don't have fans ^_^ )

Guest said:

Instead of RROD, XBox One users will be greeted with a photo of Steve Ballmer thanking those that bought it for being Microsoft's b**ch.

gingerbill said:

Doesn't the new xbox also have a good amount of super fast cache that the Ps4 doesn't??

McNasty said:

Yeah you learn the hardware two months before public release. This is going to be an EPIC failure.

I imagine that the reason for the upped specs is that the original ones were conservative and AMD and Microsoft now have final hardware and know the real tolerances.

McNasty said:

NO.

Doesn't the new xbox also have a good amount of sper fast cache that the Ps4 doesn't??

ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Yeah you learn the hardware two months before public release. This is going to be an EPIC failure.

How long do you think companies get the hardware before shipping? Far as I know two months before shipping is a normal time for getting a final chip.

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