Amazon Prime Wardrobe makes online clothes shopping easier with its try-before-you-buy...

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

While many people today do most of their shopping online, there are still those who prefer traditional brick-and-mortar retailers when it comes to buying clothes. Customers can try before they buy in a store, but purchasing clothes online comes with the risk that they’ll turn out to be unsuitable. This, and the hassle of having to return them, puts many off. Amazon, however, may have a solution.

Jeff Bezos’s tech giant has revealed Amazon Prime Wardrobe, a service for Prime members that makes the process of buying clothes online, and returning any you don’t want, much easier. It’s currently in beta, but you can sign up to be notified when it’s open to everyone.

The new service lets subscribers pick between three and fifteen items from over one million Amazon Fashion options, including brands such as Calvin Klein, Levi’s, Adidas, Lacoste, and more. These are then sent out in a Prime Wardrobe box without the customer having to pay any upfront costs.

Once it arrives, you have seven days to try out the items. If there are any that you don’t want, it’s simply a matter of scheduling a free pickup or dropping off the resalable box at the nearest UPS store and using the prepared shipping label.

One of the best elements of Amazon Prime Wardrobe is the incentive it offers users to keep the clothes. The more items someone decides to hang on to, the more they save. Keeping three or four pieces of clothing earns a 10 percent discount off everything, while five or more boosts it up to 20 percent off.

Unlike similar services offered by other companies, Amazon is not covering its costs by charging an additional fee or marking up the prices of the clothes. Prime Wardrobe is free for Prime members, and the company doubtlessly hopes it will help attract more subscribers while encouraging people to buy clothes from its store.

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insect

TS Evangelist
Sweet - never buying clothes again. Just order 7-days of clothes at a time on a 2 to 3-day overlap. Ship back everything when the next box arrives. /s

I'm sure if people do this their accounts will be flagged and not allowed to use the service anymore though (Amazon does this with excessive Prime returners who return a lot like a "try before you buy").
 

Evernessince

TS Evangelist
Sweet - never buying clothes again. Just order 7-days of clothes at a time on a 2 to 3-day overlap. Ship back everything when the next box arrives. /s

I'm sure if people do this their accounts will be flagged and not allowed to use the service anymore though (Amazon does this with excessive Prime returners who return a lot like a "try before you buy").
Of course. It's the same thing back in the days of physical shopping. Some store's introduced a try before you buy program and they got rid of it because customers abused it. Only with online shopping you are costing amazon shipping both ways.

Amazon can afford to take those looses because the program isn't really free, you pay for Prime.
 
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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Well if it's like their other return policy, you return enough things and your account gets cancelled, even if it for a defective item. Not very ethical! Oh wait, we're talking Amazon ..... no room for ethic's there!
 

Evernessince

TS Evangelist
Well if it's like their other return policy, you return enough things and your account gets cancelled, even if it for a defective item. Not very ethical! Oh wait, we're talking Amazon ..... no room for ethic's there!
Do you have a link? I'd be interested to see if this is happening to customers who aren't abusing the system.
 

petert

TS Evangelist
Sweet - never buying clothes again. Just order 7-days of clothes at a time on a 2 to 3-day overlap. Ship back everything when the next box arrives. /s

I'm sure if people do this their accounts will be flagged and not allowed to use the service anymore though (Amazon does this with excessive Prime returners who return a lot like a "try before you buy").
I am not sure what is going on, but I am assuming you cannot pull out this kind of tricks, these guys wouldn't be in business if people could abuse them so easily.
 

petert

TS Evangelist
Well if it's like their other return policy, you return enough things and your account gets cancelled, even if it for a defective item. Not very ethical! Oh wait, we're talking Amazon ..... no room for ethic's there!
Never heard of this based on my and others experience ... I returned two items in 50 orders so probably I might not qualify ...