AMD's X570 chipset won't support first-generation Ryzen

grumblguts

TS Addict
Not surprising really with the pci4.0 spec that need to be certified.
where is the motivation for a board manufacturer to certify drivers on hardware its already sold.
 

Theinsanegamer

TS Evangelist
SO WHAT?
A320 is obsolete.
X570 provides a feature set that 1st gen Ryzen is not designed to accommodate.
This is like someone buying a Volkswagen then whining because a boxer engine does not fit.
Or conversely, buying a Porsche then whining because a VW engine doesn't fit!

CLICKBAIT.

All the writers are trying to do is create a tempest in a teapot. Builders smart enough to know the difference do not care and those who buy off the rack don't care either.
Not exactly... AMD made a promise stating that the AM4 socket would remain backwards compatible until 2020.... For those uneducated masses who don't read articles like this, they could reasonably be expecting to be able to pop in the newest Ryzen processors into their old Ryzen 1 motherboards...

There needs to be articles stating that they might not be able to do this :)

Of course, this is still lightyears beyond the motherboard support Intel provides - but at least Intel doesn't make any promises - they just assume people will shell out hundreds of dollars every couple of years for their overpriced product.
Is that what they promised? What matters is that old motherboards can still run the new chips. Virtually nobody will want or need to get first gen chips working in the new 500 series motherboards. I mean, if you're building a system around a first gen Ryzen, it would be a mistake to pair it with one of these new X570's. Of course, it could be super annoying in certain rare situations, but I think most would agree that it's like 100 times more important that the new chips can run on older boards than for the oldest chips to work on the newest boards.

I myself am actually running a first gen Ryzen chip in a second gen Ryzen board, so I guess I'm kind-of one of those exceptional cases, but even I don't care if my old Zen 1 CPU will work on the new 500 series boards.
Well, except for that whole "A320 not fully supporting ryzen 3000" thing. That's kind of the complete opposite of "the old boards can run the new chips".
 

quadibloc

TS Addict
No doubt there are valid technical reasons why the X570 chipset can't support the initial Ryzen chips, but I can't imagine what those technical reasons would be. If the new chips have the power, address, and data lines on the same pins, they should just work the same, shouldn't they?

Well, there are possible reasons. The newer processors run at a lower voltage, since they're on a smaller process size. Perhaps lower than anticipated. The newer processors support a faster version of the PCIe bus. Maybe they use the same pins for that as were used by the earlier processors for the slower one, and there's an incompatibility between the signals. Obviously, maintaining 100% compatibility between generations by leaving out features from the newer Ryzen processors wasn't an option.
 

Evernessince

TS Evangelist
No doubt there are valid technical reasons why the X570 chipset can't support the initial Ryzen chips, but I can't imagine what those technical reasons would be. If the new chips have the power, address, and data lines on the same pins, they should just work the same, shouldn't they?

Well, there are possible reasons. The newer processors run at a lower voltage, since they're on a smaller process size. Perhaps lower than anticipated. The newer processors support a faster version of the PCIe bus. Maybe they use the same pins for that as were used by the earlier processors for the slower one, and there's an incompatibility between the signals. Obviously, maintaining 100% compatibility between generations by leaving out features from the newer Ryzen processors wasn't an option.
Not surprising really with the pci4.0 spec that need to be certified.
where is the motivation for a board manufacturer to certify drivers on hardware its already sold.
Read the end of the article people. It's been updated that AMD will in fact support 1st gen chips on x570.
 

RaXoR

TS Addict
No doubt there are valid technical reasons why the X570 chipset can't support the initial Ryzen chips, but I can't imagine what those technical reasons would be. If the new chips have the power, address, and data lines on the same pins, they should just work the same, shouldn't they?

Well, there are possible reasons. The newer processors run at a lower voltage, since they're on a smaller process size. Perhaps lower than anticipated. The newer processors support a faster version of the PCIe bus. Maybe they use the same pins for that as were used by the earlier processors for the slower one, and there's an incompatibility between the signals. Obviously, maintaining 100% compatibility between generations by leaving out features from the newer Ryzen processors wasn't an option.
Not surprising really with the pci4.0 spec that need to be certified.
where is the motivation for a board manufacturer to certify drivers on hardware its already sold.
Read the end of the article people. It's been updated that AMD will in fact support 1st gen chips on x570.
That's for the APUs. Raven Ridge, not Summit Ridge.
 

10thDmenxn

TS Member
They have CLEARLY said that they WILL support first gen Ryzen chips. So this title should be changed, as it is not only incorrect, but misleading.
 

jpuroila

TS Enthusiast
No doubt there are valid technical reasons why the X570 chipset can't support the initial Ryzen chips, but I can't imagine what those technical reasons would be. If the new chips have the power, address, and data lines on the same pins, they should just work the same, shouldn't they?

Well, there are possible reasons. The newer processors run at a lower voltage, since they're on a smaller process size. Perhaps lower than anticipated. The newer processors support a faster version of the PCIe bus. Maybe they use the same pins for that as were used by the earlier processors for the slower one, and there's an incompatibility between the signals. Obviously, maintaining 100% compatibility between generations by leaving out features from the newer Ryzen processors wasn't an option.
The reason is because manufacturers insist on having UEFIs with fancy graphics and stuff, and they only have very limited amount of space, so they can either have fancy UEFI or one that supports CPUs across multiple generations, but not both.
 

Danny101

TS Guru
What I would expect to happen is if one wants to keep using the first generation Ryzen, then don't upgrade the BIOS. If upgrading the BIOS means you lose support for 1st generation, but gain support for the latest generation, then that could be an acceptable compromise that motherboard makers should allow. After 2020, I imagine a new socket like AM5 or AM4+ would appear with Zen 2+ or Zen 3. I already shelled out for X370 and I will be sticking with that and a high-end Ryzen 3000 CPU for quite a while, despite the many advancements that will occur after this choice. I suppose I should have waited for X570 or the next one. At any rate, it's still a great leap forward than what I had previously. Technology continuously advances, just pick your spot, be good with it, and upgrade when it's not cutting the mustard anymore. Too many incremental upgrades can be an E-Waste environmental issue. Electronics are laden with toxic chemicals and with all the excitement over performance opportunities, just ask yourself if you really need it. Odds are you don't. If you must upgrade, try to repurposed if you can.
 
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