Apple rolls out third-party repair program in Canada and EU

Cal Jeffrey

Posts: 3,456   +1,033
Staff member
In a nutshell: Once an overly-strict product-repair Nazi, Apple has been easing its policies regarding fixing its devices lately. It is now rolling out a third-party repair initiative to the EU and Canada. It started the program last year and has seen a positive response, with over 700 shops being given training, tools, and parts to fix iPhones.

On Wednesday, Apple announced it is expanding its third-party iPhone repair program to Canada and Europe. It initiated the service about a year ago in the US. The pilot offers independent repair shops the tools, training, and access to Apple-certified parts to fix its products.

"We are thrilled to expand our independent repair program to more locations across the US and to businesses across Europe and Canada," said COO Jeff Williams. "When a customer needs a repair, we want them to have a range of options that not only suits their needs but also guarantees safety and quality so their iPhone can be used for as long as possible."

The initiative is kind of a big deal as Cupertino has a bad reputation with the right-to-repair crowd. It has participated with other companies in lobbying against laws that would force it to make its tools and part available to the general public and competing repair shops. Installing Macs with unauthorized-repair kill switches didn't help matters any either.

However, more recently, Apple has been loosening its death grip on keeping repairs in-house. Earlier this year it began offering in-home fixes. Before that, it loosened restrictions that prevented authorized partners or even the Genius Bar from fixing iPhones that had been "tampered" with or used unauthorized parts.

The company claims that it currently has more than 5,000 approved repair locations. This count includes Apple retail outlets, certified shops, Best Buy, and the 700-plus independent providers it has greenlighted since starting the program last August. Another 140 US repair businesses are awaiting approval.

Participating is not simply a matter of asking Apple for the tools. There are training videos and a verification process to go through before being given the go-ahead. Repair houses interested in fixing iPhones are directed to sign up online through its Independent Repair Provider portal.

Image credit: Difught

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m4a4

Posts: 2,850   +3,627
TechSpot Elite
I mean, this sounds nice. But they've still got a long way to go before before I'll give it to them.

Just hearing stuff from the other side from Louis Rossmann talking about it (warning, he is passionate in this video lol).

To sum up some points:
-You can't stock parts in-store (which usually means a week+ just to repair something simple). Argument being reselling parts. But still, that's ridiculous to have paying customers wait that long.
-And that's if they're allowed to repair it, because otherwise they just can't (for whatever reason from Apple).
-You have to report to them on your customers (privacy violations).
-Barred from trying to get other Apple parts. Which means, if Apple doesn't sell it (because it's too old or something), tough luck if you're in the program.

And a lot of other things that restrict proper 3rd party repair.

So, there's still too much trying to force paying customers to buy from Apple when a product the customer owns "can't" be repaired. And not because they actually can't, but because Apple goes out of it's way to put up barriers to do so.
 
I mean, this sounds nice. But they've still got a long way to go before before I'll give it to them.

Just hearing stuff from the other side from Louis Rossmann talking about it (warning, he is passionate in this video lol).

To sum up some points:
-You can't stock parts in-store (which usually means a week+ just to repair something simple). Argument being reselling parts. But still, that's ridiculous to have paying customers wait that long.
-And that's if they're allowed to repair it, because otherwise they just can't (for whatever reason from Apple).
-You have to report to them on your customers (privacy violations).
-Barred from trying to get other Apple parts. Which means, if Apple doesn't sell it (because it's too old or something), tough luck if you're in the program.

And a lot of other things that restrict proper 3rd party repair.

So, there's still too much trying to force paying customers to buy from Apple when a product the customer owns "can't" be repaired. And not because they actually can't, but because Apple goes out of it's way to put up barriers to do so.
I came here just to post this but you beat me to it, and posted a better comment then I would have.

The training is also a joke, the parts available are limited. Apple dont provide schematics.

Apple really restrict what repairs can be done, couple this with the intentionally long lead times for parts and its literally better off for repairers AND customers not to be a part of this program.

Repairers are also not allowed to do repairs outside of what apple allow or t
Source parts from anypne else or they face punishment and possible legal action (due to the contact). That means no board repairs, no ic repairs, no data recovery, ect.


Apple also demand excessive financial information of the business ontop of the privacy info it demands businesses provide