BSOD during youtube video - Windows 7 64 - suspected hardware malfunction

Hello and well met.

Prefacing this by saying that I am not terribly tech savvy either software or hardware, though I have been getting by on my own since Windows 95.

Yesterday I encountered a BSOD while playing music on youtube in Chrome browser on my stationary PC - Windows 7 64 - 4core intel 920 from 2010.

It was a hardware error BSOD of this type: https://www.google.com/imgres?imgur...hUKEwilyJaQjIn3AhVZg_0HHW50C1wQMygTegUIARDiAQ

Automatic Windows repair on boot did not change anything. Every time I tried logging into my account, I would get the same BSOD.
Afterwards it was difficult to enter safe mode, as the pc kept force-restarting during boot, often with intervals of 0,5-3 seconds many times in a row, and often ending up with the same BSOD, but I managed it twice and in the control center there were no red flags, though in safe mode there is no status for graphics card or processor.
I ran a disk cleanup, but could not run defragmentation - not sure that would help in any case. Did not have access to the Internet in safe mode.

After that I tried removing all my 4 ram blocks 1 after another, though that changed nothing.

After that I tried to replace my old GTX 275 with my old HDMI monitor that I kept. Though I got no visuals, it force-restarted a couple of times again after each other - so I don´t think it is a faulty graphics card either - there were also no graphical bugs prior to the initial BSOD. I changed to my current GTX 1060 6 GB about 1,5 years ago (I was unhappy to learn that it had a slight constant highly pitched noise, but it seems there were no performance issues) and changed to a 4k monitor in December 2021.

I backed up all my files the last time about 2-3 months ago and have no restore points to try reloading and no windows CD/boot flash drive/CD and it seems no way to get Internet access on my pc.

Suspects:
about 2 months ago suddently 80% of login attempts to my Windows profile I was getting a black screen for minutes at a time, trying to force reboot and then more same.
Eventually after some weeks this got better and as long as I gave it time, the login attempts eventually succeeded.
I thought this could potentially be related to the BSOD issue in the case of software or hardware malfunction.

A month later I was having trouble with the stereo speakers losing sound in one speaker and once or twice "blurring" the sound resently - I pinned it on a faulty cable that is built into the speakers. I did tamper with some sound settings in Windows 7.

After some research some people mentioned setup files, drivers and motherboard, but I am completely stumped, thus this post.


I attached 6 pictures showing an error message/temp WER file that Windows managed to generated based on one of the crashes/BSOD´s - not the initial one, but they seem similar.

I am in desperate straights here, please help.
 

Kshipper

Posts: 832   +202
TechSpot Elite
It's likely going to be a hard drive failure or a power supply failure or a combination of both. The price of either is not that high so you can pick one and try a rebuild. Keep your original drive disconnected if you start with a new drive.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,550   +4,518
TechSpot Elite
It's very hard to tell what the problem could be without any A-B testing. The most reasonable thing to do is to try and do a clean install of windows and see if it isn't just a problem of OS rot (the OS becoming heavier and more corrupt as time passes).
 
The system is rather old but high-end components put together by a known company.
Now I can´t get to the boot screen.

I had a friend come by with an ssd with Windows to test that also, but the power supply had died completely in the interim. So I went today and bought a modular 650 Corsair. This gave power and lights turned on, on the motherboard, but the power auto-turned off again in circles of 0,5-4 seconds, so I cut power.

My friends guess, who is a developer but not experienced in hardware, is that a faulty power supply has damaged the CPU or Motherboard. He thinks it would not cut off so quickly if it was merely the HDD that was faulty.

Thoughts?
 

Kshipper

Posts: 832   +202
TechSpot Elite
Now that you have identified that the power supply is at least partly to blame here you may have a corrupted BIOS. You need to follow the procedure your PC manufacturer gives for CMOS/BIOS reset. It usually involves disconnecting power at the wall and removing the coin battery. Then shorting the terminal where the coin battery was for a few seconds. Put the coin battery back in and when you go to turn it on be aware that it will turn on and turn off 2 or 3 times because it has to re-train memory. Just allow it to do that and you might be good to go =)
 
I admit I don´t understand half of that, but I will look into it.

Btw setup is:

Intel Core i7-860 4x2,80GHz
Now I bought Corsair Bronze 650W modular power supply (previous was a corsair 750)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-P55-UD3
1Tb hdd sata
2*4 GB DDR 3
GTX 1060 6 GB
Scythe Kama Kross silent cool
DVD Drive
Windows 7 64
 

Kshipper

Posts: 832   +202
TechSpot Elite
I admit I don´t understand half of that, but I will look into it.

Btw setup is:

Intel Core i7-860 4x2,80GHz
Now I bought Corsair Bronze 650W modular power supply (previous was a corsair 750)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-P55-UD3
1Tb hdd sata
2*4 GB DDR 3
GTX 1060 6 GB
Scythe Kama Kross silent cool
DVD Drive
Windows 7 64
Because your system is quite old, you are best to try the CMOS/BIOS battery reset but I wouldn't put too much money into it. The PSU can be used on a new machine and I would save the GTX 1060 video card and re-use that too. You can use your Win7 x64 license to get a free upgrade to Windows 10 too =)

Oh and the 1TB HDD can be used for the 2nd drive for extra storage but your new machine will (should) be an SSD (Solid State Disk).
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,739   +7,680
OK, you need to ascertain whether the machine is not POSTing (Power On Self Test), or stuck in a boot loop. Assuming the tiny speaker that comes with mobos is working, you should hear one beep after you hit the power switch.

Hopefully, the boot order is set to boot from the DVD drive first. Assuming that's the case, you can download a free copy of Ubuntu Linux, and burn it to a bootable DVD. Ubuntu will offer you the option to install, or do a "live run". Don't install it. You want the "live" (or "trial") option.

Power the machine up, open the drive tray, and insert the disc. Then, close the tray, power down and up again. (You need to "bleed the memory" first, by shutting off the PSU switch, and holding in the case power switch for a few seconds). Wait with bated breath to see what happens.

With regards to your old PSU; most of them offer several protections against possible failures damaging the mobo or CPU.. Of course, it's anybody's guess if they still work after the PSU gives up the ghost.

FWIW, it's pretty easy to trash an older Windows installation, particularly with a HDD, by trying to work with it, before it's fully booted. It is sometimes hard to tell exactly when that happens, as the machine will "pretend" to be booted before it actually is.

Don't be afraid to pull the video card and try running off the board's graphics.
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 18,739   +7,680
Captain...I don't think he is having POST issues at all?
Neither do I. It sounds like a boot loop situation. (?) However, if it's POSTing, then a hardware issue seems less likely, at least from a mobo/CPU/memory perspective.

Those Intel CPUs and Gigabyte boards wear like iron, at least all the ones I own have thus far.
 
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Kshipper

Posts: 832   +202
TechSpot Elite
Yah..I think the wonky PSU has corrupted the OS or BIOS or both which is pretty common when a PSU is on the way out. There is even a chance the HDD is weak or failing. He can try the simple stuff but it is probably time to move on. Take this as a sign to upgrade. =)
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,739   +7,680
He can try the simple stuff but it is probably time to move on. Take this as a sign to upgrade
Well, it sort of depends on what he's going to use it for. By my "standards", (or lack thereof), that G-55 rig is "barely broken in".

I just rehabbed a P-45 rig from XP 32 bit to Win 7 64 bit.

So, 8 GB DDR2-800, ($60.00), Samsung EVO 870 250 GB ($40.00 on sale), Windows 7 64 bit Pro ($30.00) , is not what I'd consider sinking a lot of money into the machine.

An SSD makes a huge difference even with boards with only a SATA 2 interface.

Besides, even if he elects to build a new machine, it's worth a hundred bucks or so to have a working backup. Just move the video card forward, and run the G-55 rig off the onboard graphics.
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 18,739   +7,680
The CMOS/BIOS battery reset after changing PSU did the trick. I salute you!
You'll want to grab an SSD for that beast ASAP. If you don't have one, you have no idea what you're missing. I have a G-55 rig as well. It's a 2 core x 4 thread Clarkdale i3-530. The Samsung EVO 870 SSD SATA in it really wakes it up.

You'd need an external HDD for your data at least temporarily. Otherwise you'd have to buy an SSD with the same capacity as your present HDD, and you'd be there all day trying to clone it.
 
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