Corsair reveals 45-inch OLED gaming monitor that can bend from flat to curved

midian182

Posts: 8,318   +103
Staff member
What just happened? If you can't decide between buying a flat gaming monitor or one with a curve, Corsair has the answer: the Xeneon Flex, the world's first 45-inch OLED display that can be bent by hand from completely flat to an 800R curve.

Corsair's Xeneon Flex 45WQHD240 joins the ever-growing list of large-screen OLED monitors to hit the market. It sounds pretty impressive even without the headline-grabbing feature, boasting LG W-OLED tech (it was built in partnership with LG), a peak brightness of 1,000 nits, 1,350,000:1 contrast ratio, a 240Hz refresh rate, 0.03ms GtG response time, and a 0.01ms Pixel on/off time.

The monitor also has a 3,440 × 1,440 resolution with a 21:9 aspect ratio and is compatible with G-SYNC and FreeSync Premium. Corsair notes that it has an anti-reflective coating to reduce glare and reflections and LG Display's protective Low Blue Light technology to help prevent eye strain.

But the feature that makes the Xeneon stand out from the crowd is its ability to be manually bent into a different shape. The idea is that users can keep the monitor flat when, for example, watching movies or working on a spreadsheet, then bend it by hand all the way up to that 800R curve for enjoying more immersion in games.

Corsair says image retention, one of the biggest concerns with any OLED monitor, is addressed using a "sophisticated burn-in prevention system which operates when both powered on, and when switched off." So confident that this will prevent problems, the company offers a three-year Zero Burn In warranty alongside its Zero Dead Pixel Warranty.

No word yet on price or availability—they'll be revealed later this year. Given that the Alienware AW3423DW 34", a joint winner in our Best HDR Gaming Monitors feature, is around $1,300, expect Corsair's bigger, bendier display to be even more expensive.

Yesterday saw the release of two other large OLED monitors. The ASUS ROG Swift models offer 138Hz refresh rates, custom heat sinks, HDMI 2.1, and 0.1ms response times, but they don't bend, at least not intentionally.

Permalink to story.

 

R00sT3R

Posts: 744   +2,304
Definitely a product I'd want others to 'Beta-Test' first before I'd risk taking the plunge..Looks like it has all sorts of potential for panel problems with the first batch...
 

zulu53

Posts: 193   +70
Convergence of technologies? I still think that the curved screen closer to the eye will win out (generically called VT goggles or glasses), with the big long term benefit that they have less life-cycle environmental impact (to produce and use and dispose of). But clearly at this time the performance/ cost curve means that this monitor is the way to go if it comes in at say $1500 as predicted. Unless you have the additional $1000 plus lying around and want to donate it to R&D on the goggles buy the monitor for the virtual reality performance. In my opinion going forward I would ask reviewers to always include a comparison between large screen VR and small screen VR when reviewing the latest in either product. Similar to what you do for CPU;s and GPU between AMD and Intel and Nvidia, its always better to know if the current "best option" from one expression of technology is ranked to the competing expression of technology.
 

zulu53

Posts: 193   +70
Very interesting. A curved ultrawide is pretty sweet for gaming, but I do prefer flat for everything else.
Curved is also better for all and any multitasking computing environments using large screens (not just games) since the eye focal length can remain the same and just the eye ball needs to move. There will be less "eye strain" e.g. 3D or 2D CADD but users can come up with their own examples. Here multitasking means a sequence of tasks being repetitively done rather than simultaneous tasks. Despite what you might understand to be the case the major portion of the R/D for these monitors comes from industrial CADD use not the gamer collective. Just as with VR goggles. Actually everything in IT technology that you can think of was/is developed for and funded by industry. Personal users like "gamers" are the tail on the dog not the dog. The title of this article is theefore incorrect. "Crucial have developed a monitor that can be used for gaming" or Crucal have de-speced and industrial monitor for use for gaming" is, or can be, correct. "Crucial have developed a gaming monitor" is incorrect. To avoid unnecessary/unfair comment on the lack of specs (like ppi) on this monitor is needs to be clear whether this is a "reduced spec monitor for pricing purposes" or not in the review.
 
Last edited:

zulu53

Posts: 193   +70
Definitely a product I'd want others to 'Beta-Test' first before I'd risk taking the plunge..Looks like it has all sorts of potential for panel problems with the first batch...
Have no fear, I am sure that the CADD industry has already done the beta-testing. Now is Crucial doing the quality control necessary - tha't as different question. They typicaly allow a higher failure rate (I.e. more defective/return products get through to end user) for public vs. industrial production - but that, again typically does not change with time - so whether you buy now or later will make no difference - you will either get one of the 5% failed or 95% good as random statistics define, these will not change with time.
 

Thanthan

Posts: 95   +201
I wonder if it can bend only one side of the screen at a time… that would be awesome for CAD + calculation work imo
 

zulu53

Posts: 193   +70
I wonder if it can bend only one side of the screen at a time… that would be awesome for CAD + calculation work imo
I am not sure that they can make it any other way. Bend one side or the other or both makes no difference.