LG's 2019 OLED TVs will soon receive G-Sync support

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

LG TVs are already considered some of the best options for gamers, thanks to their low input lag and fast response times. The company notes that its televisions' support of HDMI 2.1 allows auto low latency mode (ALLM), enhanced audio return channel (eARC), and variable refresh rate (VRR), and the addition of G-Sync support should make them appealing to PC gamers.

The firmware update is coming to LG’s 55-inch and 65-inch E9 TVs as well as the 55/65/77-inch C9 televisions.

For PC owners interested in the feature, it sounds as if you’ll need one of Nvidia’s RTX cards to take advantage of VRR over HDMI, instead of the usual DisplayPort. “We are excited to bring G-Sync Compatible support to LG’s 2019 OLED TVs and HDMI Variable Refresh Rate support to our GeForce RTX 20-Series GPUs,” said GeForce marketing head Matt Wuebbling. It's also worth noting that as the TVs don't contain an actual G-Sync module, VRR is limited to a window of 40Hz - 120Hz.

Most PC owners would rather choose a gaming monitor over using a television, but there are times when hooking your rig up to a living room set has its advantages, especially when playing local co-op games. With LG’s TVs about to offer G-Sync support, they could be a better, and certainly cheaper, option than Nvidia’s huge and exorbitantly expensive BFGD televisions, such as the $5,000 HP Omen X Emperium.

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poohbear

TS Evangelist
Lol ofcourse. They announce this 3 months after I buy an "old", yet discounted, 2018 LG OLED B8 model. :( Thank you universe. Thank you!
 

ShagnWagn

TS Evangelist
Awesome. Might entice me to build a new Gaming HTPC if video card prices and performance would be where they should.

Do these new ones still have a mandatory camcorder and microphone? If not, they are losing out on my money. For $5k, we can get a very nice projector.
 

amstech

IT Overlord
Freesync is not as good as Gsync, as always AMD's stuff is rougher around the edges with less features:

FreeSync’s openness does have some drawbacks. Shopping for a FreeSync monitor is a pain in the *** compared to buying a G-Sync display. FreeSync monitors only support adaptive sync within a specified frame-rate range: 48Hz to 75Hz in the case of many low-cost models, for example.
Some G-Sync panels include added perks like refresh rate overclocking and Ultra Low Motion Blur, which combats the notorious blurring of text and other elements at very high refresh rates. It’s a killer feature for e-sports games.
Monitors with LFC duplicate frames when refresh rates are below the FreeSync minimum, enabling the refresh rate to enter the FreeSync range. If your graphics card is pumping out 30 frames per second, LFC duplicates the frames and runs the display at 60Hz, keeping things smooth. It’s great!

It’s also not mandatory, and largely found in pricier panels. Without LFC, moving into and out of FreeSync range is jarring, as you’ll go from silky-smooth gameplay one second to stuttering or screen-tearing the next. Again: You need to do some research to get the best possible FreeSync experience.
But its still damn good.
Gsync makes my old girl feel like a new machine, best systematic upgrade since the SSD.
I love my HP Omen 27".
 

Puiu

TS Evangelist
Freesync is not as good as Gsync, as always AMD's stuff is rougher around the edges with less features:






But its still damn good.
Gsync makes my old girl feel like a new machine, best systematic upgrade since the SSD.
I love my HP Omen 27".
Freesync supports a wide 30-144 Hz range on some monitors. You should have no problems finding good monitors that support 35-40Hz.
 

gamerk2

TS Evangelist
Having a FreeSync would look more logical as it might go with new XBOX or PlayStation GPU from AMD
It's more likely the new consoles will support HDMI 2.1 (based on the fact they both claim they can output 8k), in which HDMI Forum VRR is part of the specification.

All NVIDIA is doing here is allowing its RTX series to support HDMI Forum VRR, which the LG TVs already support. LG is likely modifying the firmware to allow HDMI Forum VRR to be used on a HDMI 2.0b connection.
 

gamerk2

TS Evangelist
Based on everything I've read so far, it sounds like what is going on here is NVIDIA is adding HDMI Forum VRR support to it's RTX cards, and LG is modifying it's Firmware to allow it to be used over an HDMI 2.0b connection. Their TVs are already HDMI 2.1 capable, but since no HDMI 2.1 source is currently available there's no way to take advantage of these features.

Given Samsung supports Freesync over HDMI, it makes sense for LG to make a deal with NVIDIA to allow HDMI Forum VRR to be used over HDMI 2.0b until HDMI 2.1 capable cards hit.

Long term, as HDMI Forum VRR is a required part of HDMI 2.1, every HDMI 2.1 compliant display is going to support this mode of VRR. Displayport made a major mistake keeping Freesync an optional part of the Displayport 2.0 standard.
 

m3tavision

TS Evangelist
Freesync is not as good as Gsync, as always AMD's stuff is rougher around the edges with less features:

But its still damn good.
Gsync makes my old girl feel like a new machine, best systematic upgrade since the SSD.
I love my HP Omen 27".
Yeah, too bad there is FreeSync2.0 that is better than G-sync and FreeSync. But lets not talk about that, because my RTX doesn't support it. The Xbox and PlayStation will also support Fs2.0 along will all Samsung TVs... but I want to talk about freesync, to hide the fact there is FreeSync2.0.
 
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amstech

IT Overlord
Yeah, too bad there is FreeSync2.0 that is better than G-sync and FreeSync.
One of the reasons Gsync has been superior is the fact that, any monitor they support goes through a rigid certification and testing process.
That's the change for Freesync 2.0, along with some copied and pasted features from Gsync, but that doesn't challenge anything I sourced from that 2019 comparison. It's very very close, no doubt, but Gsync is still superior and more polished.
You get what you pay for.
 

Fuksito

TS Rookie
One of the reasons Gsync has been superior is the fact that, any monitor they support goes through a rigid certification and testing process.
That's the change for Freesync 2.0, along with some copied and pasted features from Gsync, but that doesn't challenge anything I sourced from that 2019 comparison. It's very very close, no doubt, but Gsync is still superior and more polished.
You get what you pay for.
I bought 2 times gsync monitors, and 2 times in some time they had broken pixels after time, so eventually I switched to a FreeSync monitor which was cheaper, and don't have any problem with it for long time. so don't know about which quality certification you are saying
 

bandit8623

TS Addict
One of the reasons Gsync has been superior is the fact that, any monitor they support goes through a rigid certification and testing process.
That's the change for Freesync 2.0, along with some copied and pasted features from Gsync, but that doesn't challenge anything I sourced from that 2019 comparison. It's very very close, no doubt, but Gsync is still superior and more polished.
You get what you pay for.
I bought 2 times gsync monitors, and 2 times in some time they had broken pixels after time, so eventually I switched to a FreeSync monitor which was cheaper, and don't have any problem with it for long time. so don't know about which quality certification you are saying
Its the quality of picture image. Nothing to do with pixels dying. That's just an unfortunate thing. My dell gsync has had zero issues.
 

loki1944

TS Maniac
Freesync is not as good as Gsync, as always AMD's stuff is rougher around the edges with less features:






But its still damn good.
Gsync makes my old girl feel like a new machine, best systematic upgrade since the SSD.
I love my HP Omen 27".
Freesync supports a wide 30-144 Hz range on some monitors. You should have no problems finding good monitors that support 35-40Hz.
Honestly, I have never noticed a difference with Gsync on or off, so I just leave it off.
 

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