Microsoft replaces Windows 10 update with one that doesn't kill system performance

Knifeman

Posts: 12   +4
I wonder what new problems this update will cause?
My videos started flickering, split horizontally in two.
Definitely out of sync or something and totally unusable.
Now Windows offers FIX for Flickering - BS to me. My video worked fine before last update and still works perfectly in Linux.
It should not be up to the user to try to buy another vid card or jump through loops to get another drivers. to FIX problems Windows keep creating.
 
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Knifeman

Posts: 12   +4
Sorry for the late reply, moved home and it's taken ages to get internet supplied (volunteer group, no BT lines)

OK, does this version of Linux support Windows VR? I use a Dell Vision set up and it's the only thing I like to use my Windows 10 OC for. I've tried Linux in the past but keep going back to Windows 7
The Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon does support VR.
Play On Linux program does create virtual drive for each individual Windows program. Tried it and it worked for my few old ones.
Now it is easy to install Windows programs with WINE by just clicking on the install or setup.exe - but to run them depends on which are supported.
Meaning it takes a lots of support files to function for example frameworks.
The VR is a separate thing, I do not use it yet, so have booted into my Linux to be certain.
Called Virtual box, it is design to run wide range of x86 OS, Windows included.
I would guess up to and including Windows 8.
I may have to install it and run a couple of proprietary software with it ...
You can install it with with one click from the Software Package manager . Impressive reviews from some users.
I would recommend installing Linux OS on a separate hard drive - internal, or external USB HDD. You can then boot into it separately.
Being an almost expert in Windows crashing, the more I use Linux, more I appreciate it.
You may have Windows Backups, but when Windows crash, the Restore also is crashed so you have nothing. Never once worked for me starting with 3.1 and still no difference in Windows 10.
Now the Linux is always there for me when Windows crashes again, so I can run my business without interruption. Best backup there is.
Best to you, stay safe
knifeman
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 16,212   +4,972
You may have Windows Backups, but when Windows crash, the Restore also is crashed so you have nothing. Never once worked for me starting with 3.1 and still no difference in Windows 10.
Now the Linux is always there for me when Windows crashes again, so I can run my business without interruption. Best backup there is.
Best to you, stay safe
knifeman
I honestly think the "best". backup / restore strategy for Windows, is Samsung's migration software, and a spare one of their SSDs.
Install Windows, (and your anticipated programs), on a Samsung SSD, migrate it to a 2nd Samsung SSD, and throw the first one in your desk drawer.

I've only tried this with the install to' HDD, then migrate.(The HDD is in fact kept in a drawer, or laying around the house, somewhere).

Samsung's migration software has worked flawlessly for me, at least thus far.
 

Knifeman

Posts: 12   +4
I honestly think the "best". backup / restore strategy for Windows, is Samsung's migration software, and a spare one of their SSDs.
Install Windows, (and your anticipated programs), on a Samsung SSD, migrate it to a 2nd Samsung SSD, and throw the first one in your desk drawer.

I've only tried this with the install to' HDD, then migrate.(The HDD is in fact kept in a drawer, or laying around the house, somewhere).

Samsung's migration software has worked flawlessly for me, at least thus far.
Thank you captaincranky,
that would definitely work.
Unfortunately I have an older PC with only SATA HDD.
However I have built it myself, have 4 internal 2TB HDD - 2 for Linux and 2 for Windows. My best backup was to clone Windows 10 from one HDD to another about every 3 month for complete backup. Tested that it would boot and run, then disconnected it. (free Acronis disk wizard for cloning came with my Seagate HDD)
I have all Data and Thunderbird portable email on USB3 external 2TB HDD.
Windows upgrade from 8.1 to 10 fried my MOBO and MS would not Activate my Windows.
Making even an emergency boot disk is grayed out, every recovery option need activation.
Windows work but MS makes it difficult at every turn, just to extort a buck.
The clone HDD will not boot anymore - and frankly this list is just too long.
So any Windows crash is now permanent for me, no fix without purchase.
Was preparing for this eventuality for a couple of years learning Linux.
All data is always safe so switching OS is now no problem.
No Windows Backup for me - ever.
Take care, stay safe
knifeman
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 16,212   +4,972
Thank you captaincranky,
that would definitely work.
Unfortunately I have an older PC with only SATA HDD.
However I have built it myself, have 4 internal 2TB HDD - 2 for Linux and 2 for Windows. My best backup was to clone Windows 10 from one HDD to another about every 3 month for complete backup. Tested that it would boot and run, then disconnected it. (free Acronis disk wizard for cloning came with my Seagate HDD)
I have all Data and Thunderbird portable email on USB3 external 2TB HDD.
Couple of points. SSDs, in 2 1/2" SATA 3 format, would plug right into a SATA HHD port.

Even on this box I'm using now, which is SATA 2, I got a big performance boost by install ing an SSD as C/:.

Depending on how many SATA ports your board has, you could use SSDs on the last 2 SATA connections, and still keep all 4 2 TB HDD for data only. (This assumes 6 SATA ports. If you only have 4, you're out of luck).

Assuming you only had your OS(s) & programs on the SSDs, transferring that would take minutes, instead of the likely hours it requires now.

Disclaimer: I never said my solution, was without cost.
 
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Knifeman

Posts: 12   +4
Couple of points. SSDs, in 2 1/2" SATA 3 format, would plug right into a SATA HHD port.

Even on this box I'm using now, which is SATA 2, I got a big performance boost by install ing an SSD as C/:.

Depending on how many SATA ports your board has, you could use SSDs on the last 2 SATA connections, and still keep all 4 2 TB HDD for data only. (This assumes 6 SATA ports. If you only have 4, you're out of luck).

Assuming you only had your OS(s) & programs on the SSDs, transferring that would take minutes, instead of the likely hours it requires now.

Disclaimer: I never said my solution, was without cost.
Thank you for this info. I probably have only 4 SATA sockets on the MOBO, I only have 2 HDD and a DVD plugged in at the time(that is all the SATA power plugs I have from the Power supply - would not be a problem to adapt one old style plug)
Will have to autopsy my PC to find out if there is any place I could mount the 2.5" SSD. In my 3" floppy drive slot:)
Yes, definitely would not mind extra speed :)
Take care, stay safe
knifeman
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,212   +4,972
@Knifeman You may find this cringe worthy, but there's actually very little need to put an SSD in a bay at all. Just lay it on the case floor.

SSDs don't have any exposed wiring, no moving parts, and don't save data via magnetic means.

A HDD is different, with an exposed printed circuit board on its bottom. I had a store bought Matx case eMachine at one time. Thus the HDD cage had only 2 slots. I wanted to add another HDD.

Because of the PCB being exposed, I put a piece of cardboard from a Coca-cola 12 pack under it, laid it on the case bottom, and it ran just fine for months, if not years. I threw the eMachine away, (sorry, "retired"), and AFAIK, I still have the drive and it's still working.

Should you have a spare DVD / 5 1/4" front bay, it would likely be easier to find a 2 1/2" to 5 1/4" adapter plate, and hang` the SSD on that.
 
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Knifeman

Posts: 12   +4
@Knifeman You may find this cringe worthy, but there's actually very little need to put an SSD in a bay at all. Just lay it on the case floor.

SSDs don't have any exposed wiring, no moving parts, and don't save data via magnetic means.

A HDD is different, with an exposed printed circuit board on its bottom. I had a store bought Matx case eMachine at one time. Thus the HDD cage had only 2 slots. I wanted to add another HDD.

Because of the PCB being exposed, I put a piece of cardboard from a Coca-cola 12 pack under it, laid it on the case bottom, and it ran just fine for months, if not years. I threw the eMachine away, (sorry, "retired"), and AFAIK, I still have the drive and it's still working.

Should you have a spare DVD / 5 1/4" front bay, it would likely be easier to find a 2 1/2" to 5 1/4" adapter plate, and hang` the SSD on that.

This old dog is sure learning new tricks :)
Thanks for all this knowledge, will start looking for one.
It is time for me to drag the PC out of hiding. open it and swap the drives for all updates.
Again thanks captaincranky
Take care, stay safe
knifeman