NASA's InSight lander detects 'marsquakes' on the Red Planet

Polycount

TS Evangelist
Staff member

Back in 2018, NASA's "InSight" lander touched down on the surface of Mars, with the goal of examining the Red Planet's interior. InSight has been in operation for around three months, and it's already turned up some interesting results. According to reports, InSight has detected hundreds of "marsquakes"; planetary tremors that behave similarly to the ground-shaking natural phenomena we experience here on Earth.

These quakes are caused by the "long-term cooling" of Mars -- as the planet cools, its crust becomes more brittle and begins to crack or even shatter. The impact of these cracks can be felt on the way on the surface.

The severity of most detected marsquakes paled in comparison to earthquakes, but about 20 tremors were "relatively significant," The Verge claims, coming in at a magnitude of "3 or 4." However, for the most part, even the worst quakes would not pose much of a threat to human life. "Mars is a place where we can probably say the seismic hazard is extremely low," InSight team member Philippe Lognonne reportedly said in a press release. "At least at this time."

That's good news for humanity in the long term; provided our efforts to colonize the Red Planet pay off down the line. For now, though, this news is just an interesting piece of trivia that further demonstrates the many differences between Earth and our distant, significantly less hospitable cousin.

Permalink to story.

 

samfisher

TS Rookie
I'm actually interested in the first sentence of the article. How much of the population of the world is actually exposed to either tornadoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tsunamis? Being in South East Asia, these things are extremely rare or non-existent. I personally haven't gone through any in 30 odd years. Anyone got any statistics?
 
  • Like
Reactions: ShagnWagn

ShagnWagn

TS Evangelist
Being as the article was about Mars, and the first sentence starts with "If you've lived on this planet", I assumed they were talking about "If you've lived on [Mars]." Then it goes with "tornadoes, earthquakes". I was impressed of how cool of an intro that was, but then it said hurricane. I was disappointed. lol. Great article anyway. Thank you.
 

mbrowne5061

TS Evangelist
I'm actually interested in the first sentence of the article. How much of the population of the world is actually exposed to either tornadoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tsunamis? Being in South East Asia, these things are extremely rare or non-existent. I personally haven't gone through any in 30 odd years. Anyone got any statistics?
Tsunamis and Typhoons (Hurricanes by another name) are rare in SEA? Or earthquakes? Most of SEA is on the Ring of Fire, should be plenty of tsunamis and earthquakes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wiyosaya

wiyosaya

TS Evangelist
Tsunamis and Typhoons (Hurricanes by another name) are rare in SEA? Or earthquakes? Most of SEA is on the Ring of Fire, should be plenty of tsunamis and earthquakes.
We all know Indonesia and Japan are certainly earthquake hot spots - and the region around India has trouble with typhoons.
Being as the article was about Mars, and the first sentence starts with "If you've lived on this planet", I assumed they were talking about "If you've lived on [Mars]." Then it goes with "tornadoes, earthquakes". I was impressed of how cool of an intro that was, but then it said hurricane. I was disappointed. lol. Great article anyway. Thank you.
If you did live on Mars, the dust storms might just qualify as a hurricane - except water would be unlikely to be involved there.
 

samfisher

TS Rookie
Tsunamis and Typhoons (Hurricanes by another name) are rare in SEA? Or earthquakes? Most of SEA is on the Ring of Fire, should be plenty of tsunamis and earthquakes.
It happens to countries east of where I live, but north and west don't experience any. Indonesia and the Philippines do but I don't recall any other country having any earthquakes or Tsunamis or Hurricanes. Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, and probably a few others, I can't recall any of these happening there. Basically the peninsular countries. Might be wrong tho.