Only two states are opposed to the idea of a cashless society

hwertz

Posts: 212   +124
Not interested.
A) I have cases where I just want to give someone a tip or whatever. Not stick something on the bill and hope the company gives it to the person who did the work instead of keeping it for themselves, not having half it taken away as tax.

B) Fees and privacy. Why should Visa and Mastercard (or Paypal etc.) automatically get a percentage of EVERY SINGLE TRANSACTION in the country? They shouldn't. If there's no option to make a transaction cost-free, then cash should remain an option. The US has piss-poor privacy laws. There's already been companies in the US caught essentially violating HIPPA without technically violating HIPPA -- they were analyzing people's grocery store credit card records to determine they'd gotten cancer, and suddenly this person who privately went to a doctor starts getting cancer-treatment-related junkmail. Don't get me wrong, I use my debit card plenty, but unless these problems are taken care of, cash should definitely remain an option.

C) Practical matter. I have no idea why, but several places here in town CONSTANTLY have technical problems and are cash only at those points. I've had places where the reader wore out, I've had my debit card wear out, and in terms of "tap top pay" type systems, I haven't used those yet but definitely I've had my phone run out of juice (not very often, BlackBerry KeyOne has very good battery life). I'd hate to be S. Out of Luck because nobody takes cash any longer.
 

Rocky4040

Posts: 144   +174
Cashless looks all great and all until the network goes down and you have no way to buy your gas or food or anything for that matter because your cards won't work because the network is down.

Where I live, we had a full day without debit and credit cards not working. Guess who was able to get our services still yep that's right the people that had cash in their wallets. We had to turn away so many people because they had no way to pay because the whole network was down for a whole day. You could go in directly int your bank and get cash, but most were just too lazy to do that. I was not and was still able to get and do the things I needed to do.

As others have said it looks great on paper but not ideal in real life when things go bad and break.
 

Gastec

Posts: 303   +156
Cashless looks all great and all until the network goes down and you have no way to buy your gas or food or anything for that matter because your cards won't work because the network is down.

Where I live, we had a full day without debit and credit cards not working. Guess who was able to get our services still yep that's right the people that had cash in their wallets. We had to turn away so many people because they had no way to pay because the whole network was down for a whole day. You could go in directly int your bank and get cash, but most were just too lazy to do that. I was not and was still able to get and do the things I needed to do.

As others have said it looks great on paper but not ideal in real life when things go bad and break.
I think it looks bad on paper as well. It's a terrible idea spawned by the same sick minds which a while ago squirted the abomination that we should give up private property and live in communes, from the abomination series "You will own nothing and you will be happy".
 

bandit8623

Posts: 459   +251
I'm for cashless, but without option for government to see my account balance and stuff.
Real money is something I do not use for years, I have better control using my card or phone, and that is as well much more safe.
yeah they will say that in the beginning... then all it takes is some turds to get in there and change the law. and now your stuff is in the open. the only thing going cashless does is gives the government more control over our lives.

if they go cashless they need to ban visa and all those companies from making money off us then. cant force biz to pay fees when they could use a free option.
 

JamesBlond

Posts: 212   +157
Where do they get these statistics.... they suck them from their Thumbs and people believe it.

Anybody know the end of time is on hand when a scociety comes, comunissim kicks in, you are bad, we withhold your money, close your bank..... this is the first step, and the worst
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 3,396   +4,412
One thing's for sure, a cashless society would definitely have a significant impact on crime as we know it because without cash, all transactions would be traceable.
 
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krisstarr

Posts: 29   +16
Irrespective of the method by which we buy stuff, the government knows how to rot away the value of any savings. Doesn't matter if it's in the form of paper money squirreled away in an impenetrable safe, or in digital form in a savings bank. . On the matter of the government usurping one's account which is a very legitimate fear in some countries, there is the option of buying stable coins which are always very popular.
I heard that cement building blocks are what poor people in South America buy to save their money, as a commodity it keeps up with inflation, does not rot, and is readily available. Easily exchangeable for other goods.
 

Axle Grease

Posts: 286   +233
I heard that cement building blocks are what poor people in South America buy to save their money, as a commodity it keeps up with inflation, does not rot, and is readily available. Easily exchangeable for other goods.

I *HAD* to check it out. The scheme I read about is happening in Gambia, though. Cement Block Banking...

"The “Cement Block Saving Scheme” is a “pay-as-you-go-model” whereby clients [of Amiscus Horizon] are able to save and buy cement blocks on a monthly basis, and when they have accumulated a sufficient amount for their purposes, the cement blocks are delivered to them free of charge. Clients of the scheme receive monthly statements indicating the amount of blocks they have saved. What this means is that instead of saving for a huge cash inflow to build their two-, three- or four-bedroom homes, clients can simply start saving for a package as low as GMD500 (US$12) to GMD6,000 (US$149) per month over a two to five year period. The blocks banked are a form of savings and also present a simple hedging mechanism in terms of protecting clients from price inflation of block materials such as cement and sand."

That's actually pretty cool.