Oxford study finds video games don't affect your well-being, no matter how long you spend...

waclark

Posts: 543   +343
The study does no such thing. The number of flaws and caveats in it are enormous, such as:

1) It asked the subjects themselves to rate their own mental health, rather than perform any objective evaluation.
2) It measured only a very limited period (6 weeks) rather than the months or years over which severe effects are expected to occur.
3) It specifically excluded gamers who played lengthy sessions (10+ hours)
4) Rather than tracking gamers who played only violent FPS and horror titles, it focused almost exclusively on players of low-key games like Animal Crossing, Eve Online, etc.

And most of all, its conclusion was that gaming didn't affect mental state unless the gamer felt compelled to play..
Agreed. How about they track this over a decade? Where is there any correlation between the player, their personal view of themselves and whether they feel like they get bullied by their peers? In other words, were these people considered "balanced", generally optimistic people who get along with others well or were they loners, outsiders, considered themselves to not be part of the "in" crowd?

Animal Crossing? OK, yeah. That's exactly the kind of game people are referring to when they talk about violent video games. Where's the Counter Strike players, the Overwatch, CoD, Grand Theft Auto, Fortnite or PUBG?

I don't think games alone cause people to go off on violent rampages. But, I do think that playing these kinds of games for years can give you a warped perspective on violence. Throw in a little bullying, abuse at home or drug addictions and you have an opportunity for a bad outcome.
 

Faelan

Posts: 178   +220
Rather than tracking gamers who played only violent FPS and horror titles, it focused almost exclusively on players of low-key games like Animal Crossing, Eve Online, etc.

I would not call EVE Online low-key unless all you did was mining veldspar in high-sec systems using a cheap disposable ship or sitting in Jita 4-4 all day long trying to scam people (is that still a thing? Haven’t touched it in years).

Holy moly, that game has triggered my amygdala and turned me into a drooling twitching mess from adrenaline overload on more than one occasion. No other online PvP game can give me that cocktail of excitement and sheer dread despite how hectic they may be, because the consequences for screwing up are almost nonexistent. Pff, my K/D and W/L may go down, woop woop - so what? Someone may call me a n00b? Oh noes, the humanity, my ego is doomed forever. Meanwhile, I can be working for months on something in EVE and if I screw up, it could all vanish in seconds. That’s a hell of a lot more impactful. So no, I would not call EVE low key. It’s a thinking man’s game, but emotions can run very high and very fast.
 

Faelan

Posts: 178   +220
Sitting for extend periods of time has been known to cause blood clots in the legs, look at the trucking industry. lack of physical exercise leads to weak muscles, obesity and high blood pressure.

This has become more apparent to me with age. I used to be able to sit on a crappy $50 (well, let’s say $100 with current inflation lol) chair all day long and not feel a damn thing. That’s out of the question now. I recently got a gaming laptop for multiple reasons and I have basically set it up on a makeshift platform on the kitchen counter so I can stand up while playing. I now alternate between my two systems. Because most of the games I play on the laptop don’t require 100% control focus all the time, I can move around quite a bit and do some stretches while playing. I did consider a standing desk for my desktop PC, but it’s a simrig with lots of controllers (including pedals) and other peripherals, so it would have been complicated and require more time/effort to convert back and forth than a more normal setup.
 

terzaerian

Posts: 1,472   +2,146
FIFY.
Sincerely, a researcher in the thrombectomy field.
To be sure, yes, that said, though it seems like people in my age cohort are experiencing "old age" related health issues at increasingly younger ages. I myself have an issue with gum recession that my dentist normally only sees in much older people.
 

EdmondRC

Posts: 305   +416
The study is complete BS, we all know video gaming impacts mental health from fox news studies based on alternative facts. Clearly video games impact mass shooters far more than gun control laws that African war lords think are a bit too lax and mental health funding that relies on go fund me campaigns.

Any try to explain how the creator of the movie The Human Centipede was not impacted in his youth by playing countess hours of Centipede in his local arcade?

I was 17 when Columbine occurred and every single news network was blasting videogames and Metallica. The world has changed a lot since then, but to say that the negative view of videogames is specifically a conservative talking point is just completely wrong. In fact, its not a political point at all, its a social view steeped in ignorance. The same people that often attack videogames will often say nothing of movie violence. The Columbine shooters were mimicking a movie, btw. Perhaps, more to the point is seeing others as enemies for whatever reasons, social, political, religious that causes violence and mass shootings and not being able to have a conversation without immediately assigning blame to the people you don't like.
 

yRaz

Posts: 4,604   +5,541
This has become more apparent to me with age. I used to be able to sit on a crappy $50 (well, let’s say $100 with current inflation lol) chair all day long and not feel a damn thing. That’s out of the question now. I recently got a gaming laptop for multiple reasons and I have basically set it up on a makeshift platform on the kitchen counter so I can stand up while playing. I now alternate between my two systems. Because most of the games I play on the laptop don’t require 100% control focus all the time, I can move around quite a bit and do some stretches while playing. I did consider a standing desk for my desktop PC, but it’s a simrig with lots of controllers (including pedals) and other peripherals, so it would have been complicated and require more time/effort to convert back and forth than a more normal setup.
I've used those adjustable desks. It takes some getting used to but it's well worth it. I got tired of cheap chairs, too, but for a different reason. They kept breaking on me. So I shelled out a pretty penny for a good chair and I'm happy to say I've had it for 4 years now. It is showing some surface wear but mechanically it's still perfect. It's paid for itself considering how long I had it. buying a $70-100 chair every year has saved me money and the extra comfort has been invaluable.
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,875   +4,369
Games don't affect your mental well-being directly but just like any other activity where you're cut off from the world, it takes up time from other more important things you should be doing. It can lead to young people not developing crucial skills they're gonna need later in life and all of it leads to loneliness and depression. However, gaming in moderation and with friends in person is great and fixes all these downsides.

As for violence, to say gaming causes it is simply ignorant.
 

trents

Posts: 27   +14
"Players were asked to report their experiences based on grounds including "autonomy," "competence," and "intrinsic motivation." This was to determine if they were playing for positive reasons (having fun, being sociable with friends) or less healthy ones (a compulsion to beat game goals)."

I notice nothing was said about the content of the games.
 

BigRedPDX

Posts: 287   +201
Oh no! I don't need to add more positive reinforcement to my gaming hobby. As long as obligations are met and you create a healthy set of goals, gaming is fine. I find myself gaming less and less as I dive into new hobbies and progress in my career. Sometimes I'll still sit down and pwn some noobs. I think a study on the impact of gaming on a persons motivations and self progress should be done. I've seen some game to the point where they forget what day it is.
 

Gameredic

Posts: 29   +12
The only problem is that time is a zero sum deal. You can't make more of it, so time spent gaming is necessarily time not spent doing something else. For children, excessive screen time could detract from activities more important for development. For adults, as long as obligations are met and healthy relationships are maintained it's no problem.

Like any other potential addiction, gaming is a problem when it becomes disruptive or harmful.

Disclosure:. I spend a lot of time gaming.
Yah, honestly, as a kid you could spend your time doing things so much more productive and helpful. Like interacting with other people.
 

Hadakajime

Posts: 18   +8
Exactly!

Ask an alcoholic if drinking is bad for them.
That's basically the method of this study.

The study does no such thing. The number of flaws and caveats in it are enormous, such as:

1) It asked the subjects themselves to rate their own mental health, rather than perform any objective evaluation.
2) It measured only a very limited period (6 weeks) rather than the months or years over which severe effects are expected to occur.
3) It specifically excluded gamers who played lengthy sessions (10+ hours)
4) Rather than tracking gamers who played only violent FPS and horror titles, it focused almost exclusively on players of low-key games like Animal Crossing, Eve Online, etc.

And most of all, its conclusion was that gaming didn't affect mental state unless the gamer felt compelled to play..