Samsung reveals its 110-inch MicroLED 4K television

midian182

Posts: 7,068   +62
Staff member
Forward-looking: Samsung's MicroLED-packed The Wall modular TV has been on many people's "things to buy when I win the lottery" list for years. Now, the same technology is being used in a television that's slightly more traditional—I.e., not modular—but still measures a massive 110 inches and promises some amazing features.

Samsung first introduced the 146-inch Wall TV at CES 2018. That was followed by The Wall Luxury a year later, which can be configured from 73 inches in 2K right up to 292 inches in 8K. The newly announced television uses the same micrometer-sized LED lights. This time, though, they're packed into a 110-inch prefabricated model, streamlining the installation and calibration process.

MicroLEDs offer similar benefits as OLED TVs, with inky blacks and amazing contrast. Samsung says they "eliminate the backlight and color filters utilized in conventional displays," explaining that the technology is self-illuminating, producing light and color from its own pixel structures.

"It expresses 100% of the DCI and Adobe RGB color gamut, and accurately delivers wide color gamut images taken with high-end DSLR cameras. This results in stunning, lifelike colors and accurate brightness from the display's 4K resolution and 8 million pixels," writes the Korean giant.

While it offers some of the best elements of OLED TVs, MicroLED is inorganic, meaning it lasts longer and there's little to no danger of burn-in. Samsung says it will last around 100,000 hours, or "up to a decade."

It's not only the picture that's said to be excellent; the MicroLED TV features an "embedded Majestic Sound System" that enables "5.1 channel sound with no external speaker." It also comes with Object Tracking Sound Pro that can identify objects on screen and project the sound to follow the action.

Another intriguing-sounding feature is the Multi View that allows four different sources of content from multiple external devices to appear on up to 55-inch-sized split screens (in full HD), which could be ideal for gaming and watching streams at the same time. There's also a screen-to-body ratio that puts smartphones to shame: 99.99 percent.

Speaking of games, there's no word on whether the TV comes with HDMI 2.1 support for enjoying some 4K/120Hz action. The Wall Luxury does have a 120Hz refresh rate, but we'll have to wait and see in this case.

The biggest question, of course, is the price—something Samsung hasn't revealed. It's not going to be within everyone's reach, obviously: its 98-inch Q900 8K QLED TV is currently $60,000, and that's down from the usual price of $100,000. We'll discover more details when the MicroLED 4K television becomes available globally in the first quarter of 2021.

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Uncle Al

Posts: 8,164   +6,920
My friend just picked up a TLC 65" (I think) for $250 last weekend. VERY nice unit and it looks great ..... looks like all of these LED units are going for peanuts .....
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 6,383   +4,704
Make sure you get the curved model. I hear it makes any nearby computing devices run faster.
Does it also come with a tin foil hat?
My friend just picked up a TLC 65" (I think) for $250 last weekend. VERY nice unit and it looks great ..... looks like all of these LED units are going for peanuts .....
Certainly, the TLC 65" your friend picked up and the unit in this article are very, very different. MicroLED sets are literally exactly like OLED sets except they have at least one micro LED for each pixel. The following two links explain both Micro LED and OLED technology respectively. https://www.microled-info.com/introduction https://www.oled-info.com/oled-introduction

IMO, displays like these cannot get to the market at reasonable prices soon enough.

@midian182 - Did they happen to give the brightness in nits? Micro LED should also far exceed OLED in peak brightness thus making for a better HDR experience, not to mention being able to watch the display in a lighter room than would be ideal for OLED displays.

EDIT: Corrected OLED-INFO link.
 
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wiyosaya

Posts: 6,383   +4,704
An 85” Samsung is in Microcenter for $1999. Why did they skip 90”, 95” and 100”?

I just want 100”.
Build a bigger HT room. :laughing:

EDIT: But don't worry. Micro LED displays will soon come in all sizes - as the technology matures. You'll just have to wait.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,881   +2,199
Staff member
@midian182 - Did they happen to give the brightness in nits? Micro LED should also far exceed OLED in peak brightness thus making for a better HDR experience, not to mention being able to watch the display in a lighter room than would be ideal for OLED displays.
They haven't given much detail yet, but given that it's based on The Wall, those specs should be similar to this:

 

wiyosaya

Posts: 6,383   +4,704
They haven't given much detail yet, but given that it's based on The Wall, those specs should be similar to this:

Thanks for the link. That seems to be more of a marketing "contact us for more info link" and does not seem to give any specs.
 

p51d007

Posts: 2,828   +2,180
Once the price comes down (my parents paid over $1,000 for a 32" LCD tv in the late 90's/early 2000's), these huge screens, great sound systems will further the destruction of "the movie theater". Why bother GOING to a theater, putting up with traffic, weather, parking, overpriced "snacks", rude people that won't shut up or turn off their phones, when you can enjoy an almost similar experience, in your own home.
 

Axil00

Posts: 74   +85
Once the price comes down (my parents paid over $1,000 for a 32" LCD tv in the late 90's/early 2000's), these huge screens, great sound systems will further the destruction of "the movie theater". Why bother GOING to a theater, putting up with traffic, weather, parking, overpriced "snacks", rude people that won't shut up or turn off their phones, when you can enjoy an almost similar experience, in your own home.
They will go out eventually. Its feeling stranger and stranger getting in my car and driving somewhere just yo watch something in a screen.
 

orbital

Posts: 41   +43
Once the price comes down (my parents paid over $1,000 for a 32" LCD tv in the late 90's/early 2000's), these huge screens, great sound systems will further the destruction of "the movie theater". Why bother GOING to a theater, putting up with traffic, weather, parking, overpriced "snacks", rude people that won't shut up or turn off their phones, when you can enjoy an almost similar experience, in your own home.

At this time LCDs were only with (early) TN matrices (not VA, not to mention IPS), exceptionally narrow viewing angles (especially vertically) and very high pixel response times (like 30 ms+ g2g) and input lag. At the same time expensive CRT TVs/monitors had 100Hz+ refresh rate, OLED-like blacks and so much better end user viewing/audio experience. I remember some 32 inch Sony's, Sharp's, Panasonic's and basically many more brands at this time with features like channel "super scanning" (exceptionally fast scanning and storing channels), super fast teletext and subfunctions, 100Hz refresh rate, perfectly flat screens, and some dolby-audio-like integrated systems, some with 3-4+ internal speakers. The same applied to tower audio systems which provided tons of features and integrated sound adjustment/equalizer options, multiple colour displays, quality 3-way audio and so on, which completely disappeared and went down the drain in the 2000's and beyond. Everything went cheaper, basic and low-quality mainstream. Also, made to last for up to the time of the warranty (2 years).

Apart from weight and being bulky (and apparently the lower resolutions at the time of manufacturing), many 32"+ 100Hz CRT screens still provide better picture quality, better blacks and better audio than probably 90%+ of LED LCD screens, especially edge-lit (not FALD and non-IPS ones with horrible gamma shift). If manufacturers were not so greedy to keep many of the great integrated functions in the average-to-upper-middle-class products and not go for only demo products like the microLED prototype in ridiculous sizes and prices, but providing simple QLED matrices to masses year after year instead, we the end consumer would have lived some probably 50 years ahead tech-wise and enjoyed all these high-end features just now...
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,219
At this time LCDs were only with (early) TN matrices (not VA, not to mention IPS)
IPS came before VA. Both were available, though not common, in the timeframe he mentions (late 90s/early 2000s).

If manufacturers were not so greedy to keep many of the great integrated functions in the average-to-upper-middle-class products and not go for only demo products
Yes, how dare they wish to make a profit on their products.
 

orbital

Posts: 41   +43
IPS came before VA. Both were available, though not common, in the timeframe he mentions (late 90s/early 2000s).

Yes, how dare they wish to make a profit on their products.

I doubt his parents had either VA or IPS-matrix TV back in the late 90's. First commercially available LCD TVs were either TN or some sort of early M(VA), not to mention the plasma ones that I'd personally go for instead. IPS-based ones were more of the likes of NEC/Eizo's $1000+ 20/22" monitors that still keep their colour reproduction edge some 20 years alter.

Regarding the manufacturers, not certain if you have seen/had any of the high-end CRT screens with integrated audio functions/tower audio systems I refer to in the late 90's/early 2000's, but if you did - they have nothing to do with today's so called high-end cheepos manufactured in hundreds of thousands of plastic and low-quality-components copies for triple the former's price. Of course, expectations and requirements of the masses lowered down also and manufacturers managed via skillful and persistent marketing to convince them nothing is worth more than 1 to 2 years use, then replaced by the newer model. This is why they designed them with technology to be competitive for the same period too. Minor upgrade and then another insignificant one. A constant circle of forced must-buy stuff...

Yet flagships today can still safely fulfill their purpose for more than 5 years and even then will still be "average". But the conveyor belts must keep running each day, and then the next, and the next. If you don't see it and think this is all normal, it's apparently your personal choice...
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,219
Thanks. I'm disappointed they are "only" 1,600 nits.
And with a total power consumption of nearly 4,000 watts...enough to heat a small home all by itself. But this is the feature that got my attention:

"It also comes with Object Tracking Sound Pro that can identify objects on screen and project the sound to follow the action...."
 

sac39507

Posts: 393   +204
And it probably still won't have Dolby Vision. They also don't tell you that large screens require a farther viewing distance. I was a sucker to get a large screen only to find this out later.