Tesla owner refuses to pay over $21,000 for a new battery, gets locked out of his car

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Underdog

Posts: 278   +173
Not just problems with Muskvagens but other brands and all the charge point nonsense, high initial costs, short range, rubbish resale values once the battery is tired inefficiency of ice hybrids, there is no way I would ever contemplate throwing money at these new techno mobiles. Give me something that can be repaired cheaply, by myself or a trusted mechanic, not a nerd with a laptop. Anyone wonder why older non-tech cars are getting so expensive? They are the future, not just the past. Anything else is a rich fool's game.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,837   +3,096
TechSpot Elite
Well isn't this a switch: Scavengerspc is attacking EVs, and I'm defending them.
I noticed that when I posted here!
Tesla's battery warranty has gone from 4yr/50K miles to 8yr/150K miles, with a 12 year/unlimited mile warranty on body corrosion. The range has increased, while both price and charging time have decreased. In 2014, Tesla scored the lowest of all automakers, according to the JD Power Initial Quality Survey. Today, they score higher than Volkswagen, Volvo, Mitsubishi, Audi, and Chrysler.
True but complaints about Teslas quality isn't doing them any favors.
Consumer Reports:

And Forbes, 2 years ago:

were you simply intending to substitute snark for logic
Actually, a little of both.

You may remember I have one staff member that has bought a new Model S in 2013, 2017 and 2021. The last one spent more time in the shop. It was a disaster, and she actually threatened to take them to court. Then she did under the lemon law, so they bought the car back. She has a Mach-E GT now.

And I'm definitely not down on EVs, but I am down on Tesla.

The big elephant in the room: Tesla's battery costs the same as a brand new mid size car!!
That is true, but that battery will probably last longer than the mid-size smoke pump. In my opinion too many folks fail to take that into consideration.
 
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sreams

Posts: 350   +497
The industry needed someone to create yet another DISPOSABLE item that this world previously didn't really have. Enter: Premiere Con-Man Elon Musk to sell you an overpriced, garbage car, that won't last more than 10 years before serious maintenance or overhaul is needed on the battery and other high-ticket items. Tesla's are purposefully designed to entice the younger generation that are on board with the GREEN AGENDA of Socialism/Communism, electric-everything, and doing their part for the planet (nevermind where electricity comes from). These cars are made to be disposable, remember, own nothing and be happy.

"10 years" is simply false. Tesla's (and many other manufacturers'... not including Nissan) lithium ion batteries have management systems that allow them to complete many more cycles than batteries in other devices. They are thermally managed to avoid temperature extremes and owners typically avoid leaving them at extreme states of charge (0%/100%). This means many, many more cycles than, say, a cell phone, which has no thermal management whatsoever and is constantly left at 0%/100% for hours on end every day/night. This means 1500 cycles for the car vs only 500 for a phone. So, at 300 miles of range per charge, 300K-500K miles can be expected before capacity is reduced to 80% or less. That's about 30 years for the typical driver.

I see the 10 year figure popping up quite a bit, but it isn't based on any data. It's a talking point with no supporting evidence, apart from, perhaps, the abysmal record of the low-capacity non-thermally-managed Nissan LEAF, which is the absolute worst case for modern EVs.
 
Tesla has **** customer service. -
If one spends $140,000 on a car,. And then vends out that a very expensive replacement battery is needed BECAUSE OF A TESLA DESIGN FLAW - One would absolutely expect some sort of consideration from Tesla, Sounds like they just pointed towards the door with their middle finger.

Tesla should at least meet halfway on the replacement battery. . I* bet that guy would have taken that deal. Tesla should also fix his leaky ac pipe for free.

Would have been a great moment for both Tesla and the guy,
Instead its a " LETS **** ON TESLA article.

They are about to lose their day in the sun., Every auto maker has a EV vehicle - and most of them are cheaper and more innovative than Tesla is. Take a page from Apple Tesla, and build your brand or you will get lost. - ps. this is not how you do ir
 

Rocky4040

Posts: 135   +169
I first read this story a couple weeks ago, and I'm still struck by this snowflake -- whose identifies himself as "Mario Zelaya, a Canadian ax-thrower and entrepreneur" -- incredible sense of entitlement. The car is 10 years old, meaning the battery lasted double its warranty period. Yet he drove it to the shop demanding a free one? And the only reason he wound up "locked out" of the vehicle was that he ignored the battery warning signal for months, until it failed entirely.
wow

But Zelaya's EV needed a new one after just 77,000 miles. Seems pretty sad his car became totally useless after only 77K miles. Now 99% if this was a ICE powered car (gasser) it would have made it well past 77K and when the motor finally gives up cost to replace it would be from a few hundred bucks if buy a used one or 3K to 6K if buying a new motor and guaranteed he would also with out to much trouble be able to enter his car.
 

sreams

Posts: 350   +497
The bigger elephant - outside of viral outiler cases you will never need to change it ever...
Yep. And the vast majority of packs will simply lose capacity... and will still be worth quite a bit for stationary storage. When they are finally completely expended, they are still worth a good bit as refined raw materials.
 

StrikerRocket

Posts: 151   +110
I will certainly *never* buy a tesla, that's for sure! In fact, I will try to stay away from EVs as long as possible to avoid being scammed and gouged at the same time!
Hell, the world is really going to sh...! :mad:
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,837   +3,096
TechSpot Elite
I will certainly *never* buy a tesla, that's for sure! In fact, I will try to stay away from EVs as long as possible to avoid being scammed and gouged at the same time!
Hell, the world is really going to sh...! :mad:

Sheesh, the bats are out tonight! ;)

The world has been "going to fecal matter" for a long time now.
That's why we are trying with renewables and EV's.
 

StrikerRocket

Posts: 151   +110
Sheesh, the bats are out tonight! ;)

The world has been "going to fecal matter" for a long time now.
That's why we are trying with renewables and EV's.
Yes, I get it, but I'm really not sure the manufacturing of EVs and batteries is really a better thing... Think about the pollution it generates just for lithium and the other rare metals that are needed, along with environmental/human issues. I guess one way or another, there will never be any ideal "solution" to the problem of human activity as long a reducing pollution/carbon footprint is seen as a cost and not as something desirable and positive in the long term. We're heading towards a "Soylent green" kind of future IMHO, and it's 2022... But, hey, the worst is not always bound to happen, for now, it's more likely than not.
 

Darth Shiv

Posts: 2,315   +849
I first read this story a couple weeks ago, and I'm still struck by this snowflake -- whose identifies himself as "Mario Zelaya, a Canadian ax-thrower and entrepreneur" -- incredible sense of entitlement. The car is 10 years old, meaning the battery lasted double its warranty period. Yet he drove it to the shop demanding a free one? And the only reason he wound up "locked out" of the vehicle was that he ignored the battery warning signal for months, until it failed entirely.
That's not the point. If there was a manufacturing fault that made the part fail and that fault was from WITHIN the warranty period, the manufacturer should have to rectify it even if the fault was not formerly diagnosed until after the warranty lapsed. If the evidence from prior inspections etc proved the fault existed before the warranty lapsed for example.

In this case, he is citing the fluid leak occurred BEFORE the warranty period lapsed and also showing diagnosis that this contributed to the part failure.

US consumer law is pretty hopeless and I think unless Tesla can contradict the evidence, they are in the wrong here.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,838   +1,909
That's not the point. If there was a manufacturing fault that made the part fail and that fault was from WITHIN the warranty period, the manufacturer should have to rectify it even if the fault was not formerly diagnosed until after the warranty lapsed. If the evidence from prior inspections etc proved the fault existed before the warranty lapsed for example.
Several fallacies here. First of all, every manufacturing defect by definition exists from the moment of manufacture, which is certainly "within the warranty period". By the loose definition used here, every vehicle failure in history happened due to a preexisting "defect" which caused a part to eventually fail. By your logic, manufacturers should be responsible for any and all these, , now and forever.

But the much larger issue is that this man's explanation doesn't pass the smell test. There are tens of thousands of these older-model Teslas which have been driven four or five times as many miles, in much hotter climates like Texas, Arizona, and Southern California. These vehicles have probably seen twenty times the A/C usage this one has -- yet they're not failing in droves.

No, the far likelier explanation is that this is simply a case of Toronto's infamously salty winter streets corroding yet another vehicle into oblivion.
 

cheapcomputers

Posts: 9   +6
This reminds me of a story I read in Autoweek magazine 20-30 years ago. A man took his Toyota Supra to the dealer to have the engine replaced under warranty. They refused to do it when they found he had never changed the oil through 55,000 miles of driving.
 

m3tavision

Posts: 1,010   +844
Who cares if the battery didn't work.... but if you PLUG in the Car, it should power the door-locks and other things, along with also charge the car.

Engineering snafu.... or at least design your car with expensive door locks like all other cars, so you can mechanically open them with a freaking key.
 

sreams

Posts: 350   +497
No. The plug is the equivalent of a gas nozzle. It serves only to add fuel. Not to power electronics. The reason it doesn't work... the plug does not deliver 12VDC. The small 12V battery does. Just like with any other car. And all of the electronics are 12V.

Who cares if the battery didn't work.... but if you PLUG in the Car, it should power the door-locks and other things, along with also charge the car.

Engineering snafu.... or at least design your car with expensive door locks like all other cars, so you can mechanically open them with a freaking key
 

WhiteLeaff

Posts: 55   +66
Current technology is not suitable for creating electric cars. It's ridiculous how they want to force an idea without having a solution to so many problems, Guess if anyone can make money off of it that's fine..

To make EVs viable, batteries need to be at least twice their current density and not rely on lithium or cobalt.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,837   +3,096
TechSpot Elite
Current technology is not suitable for creating electric cars. It's ridiculous how they want to force an idea without having a solution to so many problems
I'm sure you mean the problems such as the connections to air pollution and environmental damage.
So yeah, aren't we lucky that the fossil fuel industry has fixed all those things. Right?
Guess if anyone can make money off of it that's fine..
Shell, ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP and Conoco Phillips strongly agree with that.
To make EVs viable, batteries need to be at least twice their current density and not rely on lithium or cobalt.
But why? Are you as equally upset that FFV's are multitudes worse as far as environmental impact?
 
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