Valve's Proton project has brought 6,500 Windows games to Linux so far

I got sick of Windows as well and have switched to linux on all my personal machines. Most games in my steam library work perfectly fine in linux with just a small performance difference compared to windows but I'll take that anyday over having to deal with Microsoft's shortcomings.
Linux runs so light and smooth and I really enjoy being able to tweak anything to my liking.
Give up all the great games Windows has to offer, to say that Linux works smoothly and perfectly, and the truth is ... There are a lot of compatibility issues and drivers on Linux especially among the different distributions, so please don't tell us fairy tales.
 

jizzyburnizzy

Posts: 76   +24
Give up all the great games Windows has to offer, to say that Linux works smoothly and perfectly, and the truth is ... There are a lot of compatibility issues and drivers on Linux especially among the different distributions, so please don't tell us fairy tales.
Your issues are not my issues. I use ubuntu server and have 4 different systems running 4 different distros (just for fun) and I dont have any issues. Granted I dont use too many unique applications.
 
Give up all the great games Windows has to offer, to say that Linux works smoothly and perfectly, and the truth is ... There are a lot of compatibility issues and drivers on Linux especially among the different distributions, so please don't tell us fairy tales.
I'm not sure what you're trying to say on drivers and compatibility. Drivers aren't distribution specific as they're in the kernel and there are no compatibility problems with applications between distributions. All a developer has to do to make their application work the same across all the distributions is package it as either an appimage or a flatpak.

No linux is not smooth and perfect but that's because OEM's don't test and pre-install linux on their hardware like they do Windows and many application developers use middleware that break any chance of a linux port. Neither problem is a failure on the part of linux based operating systems or their developers.

They're definite problems for mainstream adoption of linux on the desktop but not every linux user really cares if the year of the linux desktop ever comes. Users of linux are seeing all the pain points of using linux completely disappear even without it going mainstream. With the advancement of technology it's becoming easy for developers to build their applications around cross distribution development tools. And since the mobile platform is probably more lucrative than even the desktop in many instances developers are actively making choices that favor cross platform compatibility which is forcing the companies that design development tools to start improving their cross platform support.

Honestly all it would take for a new user of linux to learn everything they'd ever need to know to be completely familiar with the platform and troubleshooting the occasional issues is a short educational course that'd take maybe a week to complete. I acknowledge that's still too much work for the average person so it's still not ready to go mainstream.
 
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Don't go by the offical list numbers for Linux support on steam, it doesn't list games supported by proton. Proton crowd sources the settings for games that other people have gotten to work on Linux. Steam, then automatically configures proton on your computer using those people's settings.
I've had at least one Linux supported game displayed with that filter which tried to install Proton. It starts with "Doki Doki"... And I haven't enabled "Enable Steam Play for all titles", though "supported titles" are ticked by default. Wish it was more clearly labelled so I can check protondb.com less.
 
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Give up all the great games Windows has to offer, to say that Linux works smoothly and perfectly, and the truth is ... There are a lot of compatibility issues and drivers on Linux especially among the different distributions, so please don't tell us fairy tales.
If you have very niche / non-mainstream components in your PC then sure, you may have a hard time getting drivers sorted in Linux. But if you have mainstream components, and you're not fidgeting around with the most obscure distributions out there, everything should work right out of the box. I'm using Manjaro Linux on my gaming PC at present, and I had to install exactly zero additional drivers. The only game I had to jump through hoops to get working was Borderlands 3 with its requirement for the infernal Windows Media Foundation Codecs, and even that was sorted in 15 minutes of troubleshooting.

Gaming on Linux is not for everyone, and I'm guessing it never will be. There are those who want an "on rails" experience, such as is the case with Windows 10, while others want the freedom to configure their environment any way they see fit. Luckily both options are available to us, so choose the approach that works for you.
 

Markoni35

Posts: 870   +341
There are several major problems with Linux:
- Lack of good graphics drivers
- Very low standards in user-interface looks and ergonomics. Yes, some apps look and feel great, but most of them don't. GUI expectations on Linux are very low and this results in apps that have horrible GUIs.
- Lack of good free apps. Yeah, who would have expected that on a FREE OS?? There's a lot more excellent free apps on Windows than on Linux.
- Some popular apps don't have their Linux versions. Now, if that app is absolutely needed for your work, then you have no choice.

For those reasons Linux is still not as popular as Windows. But one of the major problems is that old users are more in love with the command-line than GUI, resulting in more command-line apps, which repulses other users.