Windows 11 cannot open apps with non-ASCII registry keys, Microsoft video shows why OS...

zakislam

Posts: 52   +1
In brief: The issues emerging from Windows 11's recent launch have become an interesting topic for many. Adding to the growing list of problems is a new compatibility issue affecting applications using some non-ASCII characters in their registry keys.

Microsoft revealed that certain apps could fail to open as a result, as well as cause other issues or errors in the operating system. Due to detecting the bug, Microsoft has placed a compatibility hold, resulting in users who have affected devices not being offered Windows 11 or removing the ability to install it.

"Compatibility issues have been found between apps using some non-ASCII characters in their registry keys or subkeys and Windows 11. Affected apps might be unable to open and might cause other issues or errors in Windows, including the possibility of receiving an error with a blue screen," Microsoft detailed.

The extent of the problem doesn't stop there, though: affected registry keys that feature non-ASCII characters might not be able to be repaired at all.

Users are advised not to attempt to manually upgrade to Windows 11 with the Update now button or the Media Creation Tool until a security patch can be released.

Windows 11 has also been plagued with a number of other issues. It's slowing down AMD CPUs by up to 15 percent, some networking software may slow down internet speeds, and a memory leak is impacting performance.

Elsewhere, although it's been a controversial requirement, Microsoft detailed why the OS requires TPM 2.0 in a video. The behind-the-scenes look at the security designed to protect Windows 11 is delivered by Microsoft security expert Dave Weston. Users will still be able to bypass the TPM requirement, however, in addition to a method to disable VBS.

Analyst firm Gartner recently said Windows 11 features could have easily been released as an update for Windows 10. The revamp was more about creating "a marketing opportunity for the PC ecosystem," the company stressed.

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Dimitriid

Posts: 1,333   +2,604
Applications shouldn't need to be centrally controlled inside a "WIndows Registry" to begin with that just introduces a single point of failure and thus has to be so closely managed. If all the calls for resources were modular and each application handled it's own settings and configuration files then you'd have far less issues like this among many others.

Again anything Unix-like has been doing this better for decades.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 6,736   +5,179
Applications shouldn't need to be centrally controlled inside a "WIndows Registry" to begin with that just introduces a single point of failure and thus has to be so closely managed. If all the calls for resources were modular and each application handled it's own settings and configuration files then you'd have far less issues like this among many others.

Again anything Unix-like has been doing this better for decades.
M$ pushed application settings away from the ini file many years ago. This is solely, IMO, on them. BTW - there is only API for accessing the registry from within an application running on Windohs. It sounds like the problem, in this case, is that the registry API itself is incapable of handling anything other than ASCII characters - which, to me, is rather ironic given that Windohs, itself, is supposed to handle the unicode character set.
 

Burty117

Posts: 4,267   +2,342
Applications shouldn't need to be centrally controlled inside a "WIndows Registry" to begin with that just introduces a single point of failure and thus has to be so closely managed. If all the calls for resources were modular and each application handled it's own settings and configuration files then you'd have far less issues like this among many others.

Again anything Unix-like has been doing this better for decades.
Just a question, have you ever had to manage a decently sized enterprise?
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 1,333   +2,604
Just a question, have you ever had to manage a decently sized enterprise?
My team at work is implementing a cloud based deployment of several on-premise large databases. I know managing servers is a lot of work but there are tools like Ansible that make managing Linux based servers far more manageable.

If you don't want to trust me that's fine, but most of the web and I'm almost sure this very website runs on Linux infrastructure that's managed without the need for a central registry like Windows does it and this can and does include ways to make deployment far more transparent for end users or a non-issue for developers with tools like containerization.

So no I don't agree with the point you where going for. It's not entirely without merit but it's not necessarily needed to manage large scale deployments.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,356   +7,164
LOL ..... like so many other Microsoft applications, this one will finally be useable by the time they are ready to roll out windows 12 ... or 15 ..... or .....
 

Thretosix

Posts: 110   +109
Your daily reminder that TPM 2.0 is supported in Windows 10. You don't have to infect your PC with Windows 11.
 

DjoCoeur

Posts: 44   +28
Just wondering when we will learn that hackers or the FBI/CIA/NSA found a way to access data stored in the TPM chip.
 

Burty117

Posts: 4,267   +2,342
My team at work is implementing a cloud based deployment of several on-premise large databases. I know managing servers is a lot of work but there are tools like Ansible that make managing Linux based servers far more manageable.

If you don't want to trust me that's fine, but most of the web and I'm almost sure this very website runs on Linux infrastructure that's managed without the need for a central registry like Windows does it and this can and does include ways to make deployment far more transparent for end users or a non-issue for developers with tools like containerization.

So no I don't agree with the point you where going for. It's not entirely without merit but it's not necessarily needed to manage large scale deployments.
The painful part of this entire comment is the deliberate targeting of using servers as examples on a Windows 11 article.

I was specifically talking about End-User devices, Tablets, Laptops, Desktops. Have you tried supporting and maintaining 100+ Linux devices vs Windows devices?
 

ZedRM

Posts: 660   +420
That video was a load of cow muffins.

Dear Microsoft,
The answer to TPM/SecureBoot is NO! It will NEVER be a yes. We will continue to use Windows without those clearly artificial requirements. If you try to force it further we will hack your crap and remove it. Deal with it.

Best regards,
The World
 
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