Windows 11 issues mounting, networking software may slow down internet speeds

Cool. I won’t use Linux as it doesn’t play the games I build a gaming PC for. It’s also generally a bit rubbish, it’s probably better than Windows but compared to Mac OS it’s annoying.

Linux won’t take Windows users whilst things don’t work on Linux. People will begrudgingly use Windows still. So it Linux really wants to make ground it needs to play games in my case. Or maybe run the Adobe suite for pro video makers? You get the point.
Out of interest, what games you are specifically interested in does it not play?

While I would agree with most of what you're saying, I wouldn't call Linux "generally a bit rubbish". Maybe support, documentation or compatibility but outside of that it's probably a much better OS than any Windows version you can think of. The three factors I mention will come in time as Microsoft keeps alienating their user base. The enthusiasts (such as Adi6923 and myself) will jump ship first, leading to improved documentation/support (Linux being a community driven effort). Valve is making massive strides pushing compatibility (for games) along, driven by their Steam Deck ambitions.
 

Adi6293

Posts: 931   +1,309
I recently took the plunge and did a dual boot setup with Pop OS on my main rig. I wouldn't call myself an experienced Linux user by any means but I've fiddled with Linux Mint before (and still have a PC for content streaming running Mint).

The learning curve is pretty steep, I spend a lot of time figuring out how to do some things in Pop OS that I can do while half asleep in a Windows environment. As much as Linux users would point you towards just using Google to get answers, for an "entry level" Linux user that's difficult because not everything is well documented. Case in point is that I struggled with my spare hours over several days to get Assassin's Creed Origins from my Steam library working. Finally got that done last night after finding an obscure post about how to install Ubisoft Connect into the ACO's compatability folder using the specific version of Proton. But, for some of that time, I dissappeared down a rabbithole wondering why Firefox refused to connect to Ubisoft's own website for downloading the install executable and still haven't figured that out, working around the problem by downloading off of Techspot.

Still, it's rewarding when you get it right. That is half the fun for me in getting to grips with Linux and Pop OS in particular. Doable, yes. For the casual user, no, not yet. Hopefully soon though.

I think what I will do is install POP OS on my spare pc and see how it runs and if I can get it working alright I will do the switch, I never liked Windows 10, only upgraded to it due to DX12. What system are you using? I'm on 3080 and 10850K, I've heard AMD is better for Linux, is that true?
 
I think what I will do is install POP OS on my spare pc and see how it runs and if I can get it working alright I will do the switch, I never liked Windows 10, only upgraded to it due to DX12. What system are you using? I'm on 3080 and 10850K, I've heard AMD is better for Linux, is that true?
You have a more powerful system than I have, I'm on a Ryzen 5 1600 and 1080ti. I wouldn't say that I really push the limits of my system to the point of knowing whether "AMD is better for Linux" and I have all of a few days experience gaming on Linux so I can basically tell you what I've read. Regarding graphics, AMD is better supported on Linux generally but then again part of the attraction of Pop OS is that you can download a version with Nvidia drivers baked in. On the CPU side, perhaps AMD would be gimped less often by the type of stuff that's going on at the moment with Windows 11 AMD users suffering a performance penalty due to something Microsoft did. My gut says you'll likely lose more performance on the extra overhead of running something like the Proton compatibility layer than the brand of your CPU will dictate. Be realistic in your expectations, anything that doesn't have native Linux support will suffer some FPS penalty from what you get in Windows. A website like Phoronix may be a good place to dig into detail hardware performance.

Try Pop OS and other Linux distros (Linux Mint is another friendly option for newbies) on that second system of yours, there's nothing to lose really. Be prepared to invest some time in it though.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,684   +6,463
Ya think? This has got to be the worst release of Windows in recent history. Microsoft should be absolutely ashamed of this pile of hot garbage.
In their "heart of hearts", they probably are. That wouldn't in any way shape or form, prevent them from selling it to you.

I mean, look at how many of you are posting you already have it. (y) (Y)
 

Sausagemeat

Posts: 1,054   +874
Out of interest, what games you are specifically interested in does it not play?

While I would agree with most of what you're saying, I wouldn't call Linux "generally a bit rubbish". Maybe support, documentation or compatibility but outside of that it's probably a much better OS than any Windows version you can think of. The three factors I mention will come in time as Microsoft keeps alienating their user base. The enthusiasts (such as Adi6923 and myself) will jump ship first, leading to improved documentation/support (Linux being a community driven effort). Valve is making massive strides pushing compatibility (for games) along, driven by their Steam Deck ambitions.
I need to be able to run Steam, Xbox game pass, Epic games store, minecraft Java edition, battle net, EA desktop and Bethesda. I use steam the least by far despite owning most of my games on it.

And Linux is a bit rubbish. Sure it’s better than Windows but that doesn’t say much. There is a passionate and vibrant Linux community and to those people Linux is everything, I can see you’re a member of this cult and to people like you Linux is amazing. But to the average Joe it’s lacklustre.

But for me I’d take windows everyday of the week over Linux as it runs the software I need. If you want Linux to be actually be a viable alternative you need to get the big corporations to get their software to work on it.