Windows 11 issues mounting, networking software may slow down internet speeds

zakislam

Posts: 52   +1
In brief: Microsoft’s Windows 11 was released recently with a few worrying bugs, most notably a memory leak issue, but the problems for the operating system don’t stop there as more emerge with Microsoft updating its known issues page.

A new bug was discovered for devices running Intel's Killer networking software. The compatibility issue could result in users dropping User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets "under certain conditions."

"This creates performance and other problems for protocols based on UDP. For example, some websites might load slower than others in affected devices, with videos streaming slower in certain resolutions. VPN solutions based on UDP might also be slower," Microsoft detailed.

It doesn’t stop there, though: the same issues are also affecting any Windows 11 device running Dell’s SmartByte software, which is an application designed to boost signal strength for browsing, streaming and downloading. It now comes pre-installed on some of Dell’s laptops and is enabled by default.

The fix is due for release in the upcoming security update on October 12. Beyond the aforementioned bugs, Microsoft listed another compatibility issue pertaining to Oracle’s VirtualBox; users may be unable to start Virtual machines (VMs) and encounter errors. Oracle is currently ironing out the complications, with a patch scheduled for a release sometime later this month.

A bug that Microsoft has yet to acknowledge the existence of is the memory leak reported by users. File Explorer is accumulating RAM and not releasing it when users open a new window, effectively slowing one’s system down.

Over 60 percent of PC users are unaware of Windows 11’s launch, and based on these prominent problems, Microsoft may prefer it remains that way while it works on a more stable version. The general consensus for the OS’ latest iteration asserts it’s still a work in progress, with reviewers having mixed feelings. One unpopular decision in particular was Microsoft’s controversial system requirement, TPM 2.0.

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Kyle stagnight

Posts: 7   +21
Yup I have the networking one too. Slows my internet, I had to remove Killer network software.
My PC also freezes if it goes into Screensaver mode. I lost work notes the other day. I hate Win 11. Piece of crap.
I have memory leak of Windows Desktop Manager process too. Uses 10 GB of raM!!

Im a tech user so I can deal with these every-day issues. Hey we are still allowed to complain about a released product though right? Its not beta anymore. (But we all know it is)
 

isamuelson

Posts: 143   +37
From what I've read, there was a test done in Windows 10 and the Windows Explorer memory leak is there as well. However, they stated that after a few hours, Windows 10 seemed to clear up the memory better, but not completely. as opposed to Windows 11 which doesn't seem to clear up the memory without a reboot.
 

sagbobbit

Posts: 8   +3
It's a breath of fresh air when you start looking at these headlines from the perspective of a Linux user . . .
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 6,760   +5,203
Leave it to Microsoft to stumble all over themselves. They started down this path when Windohs 10 came out, IMO. Although, it was arguably present in Windohs NT, too. Service packs for NT were notoriously unstable back in the day and often gave that screen we all know and love, the BSOD. 🤣

I am glad none of my home PCs are capable of running Windohs 11; it sounds like it will be just as problematic as Windohs 10 - if not more so. :rolleyes:
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 6,760   +5,203
It's a breath of fresh air when you start looking at these headlines from the perspective of a Linux user . . .
I agree. I have a firewall/gateway PC that I built many years ago that is now running openSuSE 15.2. I've updated it over the years from major release to major release, and the process has been nearly flawless for the past three or four years. The only time I had a problem was when I cloned to a bigger drive. Fortunately, there was some knowledgeable user out that that provided an easy fix.

I cannot say the same thing about Windohs 10. I have one PC where I got a blue screen on a major update from 1809 or so and all M$ "tech support" could say was "Reinstall". :rolleyes: Yeah, right!
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 6,760   +5,203
Headline change: "New software might have bugs"

Wow... this is the first time anyone has ever released a major piece of software that has some bugs that will be patched in the near future...
There's a difference between M$ saying they will patch it in the near future and them actually patching it in the near future. Some of these bugs were known in the beta, and M$ said the same thing - they will be patched in the near future. Yet the patch(es) failed to make it to the public debut of the OS?? To me, it is typical of M$ yet I still have to say WTF?? M$ is still playing their :poop: games.
 

Sausagemeat

Posts: 1,056   +877
I think il wait until Windows 12. I’d go to Linux if it was actually a viable alternative. But it definitely isn’t.
 

Irata

Posts: 1,812   +3,053
Headline change: "New software might have bugs"

Wow... this is the first time anyone has ever released a major piece of software that has some bugs that will be patched in the near future...

Yup, that‘s sadly pretty standard why it‘s always wise to let new software / OS mature a bit unless you absolutely need to run it, e.g. to support your new CPU‘s thread director / specific scheduling requirements.
 

Moochy

Posts: 10   +16
Isn't Win 10 running fairly well? Why would one be an early adopter of Win 11, that way lies madness. Amazes me how people have to have the latest everything when most of the time, what they have, is perfectly fine. I am thinking of overpriced high end GPU's. I am still using my 1070ti/1440 and it runs everything I do and play very well.
 

MaitieS

Posts: 113   +130
Headline change: "New software might have bugs"

Wow... this is the first time anyone has ever released a major piece of software that has some bugs that will be patched in the near future...
Microsoft should just change Windows 11 to Cyberpunk 11 and everyone would be very happy and very supportive even if it would be missing 90% of features they announced :)
 

seeprime

Posts: 633   +809
I think il wait until Windows 12. I’d go to Linux if it was actually a viable alternative. But it definitely isn’t.
Whether any Linux distro is viable for any particular user depends, of course, on what they do with their PC. I've been testing Linux distros for almost thirty years. Nowadays, many of them are perfectly useful for everyday tasks. None are drop in replacements, of course. Lately, my tests indicate that MX Linux is faster for me to work on customer connected drives than Windows 11 is. It was a breeze installing Chrome on MX, unlike Linux Mint and some others. There likely are better Linux choices, or soon will be.

The year of Linux on the desktop has been inching closer for many years. Unless Microsoft seriously annoys most Windows users, the year of Linux on the desktop remains in the future.

Also, one of my two workstations still runs Windows 7 Pro, with 0patch Pro keeping it patched. It's much faster than Windows 10 v.21H1 is. Five years ago, 10 and 7 ran within a few percentage points of each other, depending on what was being measured. The bloat of modern Windows almost requires having a more powerful PC than should be needed. I really think this is one reason Microsoft is keeping Windows 11 tied to newer hardware. It's way too buggy at the moment. More powerful machines tend to obfuscate the problem.
 

Adi6293

Posts: 931   +1,309
It's a breath of fresh air when you start looking at these headlines from the perspective of a Linux user . . .

I'm actually really tempted to switch to Pop OS because I'm really sick of Windows 10, lack of time really keeps me with Windows atm
 

Sausagemeat

Posts: 1,056   +877
Whether any Linux distro is viable for any particular user depends, of course, on what they do with their PC. I've been testing Linux distros for almost thirty years. Nowadays, many of them are perfectly useful for everyday tasks. None are drop in replacements, of course. Lately, my tests indicate that MX Linux is faster for me to work on customer connected drives than Windows 11 is. It was a breeze installing Chrome on MX, unlike Linux Mint and some others. There likely are better Linux choices, or soon will be.

The year of Linux on the desktop has been inching closer for many years. Unless Microsoft seriously annoys most Windows users, the year of Linux on the desktop remains in the future.

Also, one of my two workstations still runs Windows 7 Pro, with 0patch Pro keeping it patched. It's much faster than Windows 10 v.21H1 is. Five years ago, 10 and 7 ran within a few percentage points of each other, depending on what was being measured. The bloat of modern Windows almost requires having a more powerful PC than should be needed. I really think this is one reason Microsoft is keeping Windows 11 tied to newer hardware. It's way too buggy at the moment. More powerful machines tend to obfuscate the problem.
Cool. I won’t use Linux as it doesn’t play the games I build a gaming PC for. It’s also generally a bit rubbish, it’s probably better than Windows but compared to Mac OS it’s annoying.

Linux won’t take Windows users whilst things don’t work on Linux. People will begrudgingly use Windows still. So it Linux really wants to make ground it needs to play games in my case. Or maybe run the Adobe suite for pro video makers? You get the point.
 

brucek

Posts: 943   +1,364
Headline change: "New software might have bugs"
But that would be a dumb headline because everybody already knows that new software might have bugs. It would add nothing.

Whereas the actual headline and article provides specifics as to what the bugs are, which could be important information to anyone who already upgraded / had their system auto-upgraded; or to anyone who may take complaints or support requests from them; or otherwise be downstream of them -- which may be a lot of readers here.
 

Bulllee

Posts: 255   +170
Maybe cleverer than we thought.
Rivers to cross and bridges to climb seems like that from my perspective.
 

trparky

Posts: 978   +1,074
Microsoft's latest OS version not off to an encouraging start
Ya think? This has got to be the worst release of Windows in recent history. Microsoft should be absolutely ashamed of this pile of hot garbage.
 
I'm actually really tempted to switch to Pop OS because I'm really sick of Windows 10, lack of time really keeps me with Windows atm
I recently took the plunge and did a dual boot setup with Pop OS on my main rig. I wouldn't call myself an experienced Linux user by any means but I've fiddled with Linux Mint before (and still have a PC for content streaming running Mint).

The learning curve is pretty steep, I spend a lot of time figuring out how to do some things in Pop OS that I can do while half asleep in a Windows environment. As much as Linux users would point you towards just using Google to get answers, for an "entry level" Linux user that's difficult because not everything is well documented. Case in point is that I struggled with my spare hours over several days to get Assassin's Creed Origins from my Steam library working. Finally got that done last night after finding an obscure post about how to install Ubisoft Connect into the ACO's compatability folder using the specific version of Proton. But, for some of that time, I dissappeared down a rabbithole wondering why Firefox refused to connect to Ubisoft's own website for downloading the install executable and still haven't figured that out, working around the problem by downloading off of Techspot.

Still, it's rewarding when you get it right. That is half the fun for me in getting to grips with Linux and Pop OS in particular. Doable, yes. For the casual user, no, not yet. Hopefully soon though.