Xbox Design Lab offers over 30 million color combinations for custom controllers

GGGos

Posts: 11   +0
Staff
What just happened? The revamped Xbox Design Lab lets you pick a color for every piece of a custom Xbox Series X controller of your liking. There are 18 colors to choose from in each section, with millions of combinations to get your new controller order in, looking just how you've imagined it. You can even get it laser engraved to say something silly like "Git Gud."

Microsoft has returned with a improved version of Xbox Design Lab. You can use their revised web app to customize a controller, based on the model that ships with their Xbox Series X and Series S, with millions of color combinations.

The service comes with free 14-day shipping and each controller will cost you $69.99, about $10 more than grabbing a plain-colored device off the shelf at your local retailer. The premium is likely worth it to many gamers who’ve been dying to rep the colors of their favorite sports team, or just dreaming of a controller with yellow-purple drip like the one Microsoft showed off on Twitter. You can place your order today in the US, Canada, and most Western European countries.

In the customization page there are 6 regions on the controller to select from a rich and vibrant roster of colors. There are a further 2 lists of choices for the forward-facing buttons where you’re offered a handful of styles from minimalist and modern to classic and iconic.

There's also the option to have a word or phrase laser engraved in small gray text along the bottom of the front plate of the controller for an additional charge of $10.

This wireless controller can connect via Bluetooth to the following devices:

  • Xbox Series X
  • Xbox Series S
  • Xbox One
  • Windows 10 Devices
  • Android
  • iOS

There's no support for patterns, designs, or logos, just solid fill colors, but this shouldn’t be an issue if the controllers come out even half as vibrant as the render shown on the Design Lab page.

There are no other configurable options outside of colors and engraving. A wired option, or perhaps the ability to opt for the older style of D-pad would have been welcome additions, but an extra ten bucks to get your controller looking exactly how you imagined it definitely isn’t a terrible option to have.

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 5,042   +5,650
I can't speak to the quality of the Xbox Series X controller yet, but the WORST experience I've EVER had with a console controller was the Xbox One's.

I have had to replace 6 of them - at least.

Either the triggers gave out of there was stick drift.

The best experience I've had was with Xbox and Xbox 360.
 

Toju Mikie

Posts: 196   +179
I can't speak to the quality of the Xbox Series X controller yet, but the WORST experience I've EVER had with a console controller was the Xbox One's.

I have had to replace 6 of them - at least.

Either the triggers gave out of there was stick drift.

The best experience I've had was with Xbox and Xbox 360.

Yeah, all three versions of the Xbox One controller had some issue. I had the Xbox One controller v3 (1708), and after a few months, the bumper buttons became hard to press. I opened up the controller, and lo and behold, there was still a design flaw there the two bumper buttons was connected by a single long piece of plastic. Why they decided to make it this way and not as two separate buttons like the Dualshock 4, I don't understand. Maybe it was cheaper to make it that way. Anyway, the parts for the controller are very cheap to replace, but it's still a hassle.
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,148   +3,049
I always wonder why it takes them so long to come up with such basic features that people will surely like. You just know people want different colored controllers and you only offer it now? You can apply this to most things and even raise the price to cover the cost.