In brief: Virginia has become one of the first states to make sharing deepfake videos and photos of people without their consent illegal.

Virginia's revenge porn law, in place since 2014, has been updated to cover deepfakes. The technique uses machine learning to manipulate videos and images, often as a way of digitally placing someone’s face onto another person’s naked body.

The amendment covers “a falsely created videographic or still image,” which means it includes both complex, realistic deepfake videos and simple alterations to photos using software such as Photoshop. Anyone who shares this content as a means to “coerce, harass, or intimidate” someone faces a fine reaching $2,500 and up to one year in jail.

The law went into effect on Monday, and comes just after a deepfake app called DeepNude, which turned photos of clothed women into nudes, was taken offline after it gained media attention.

Following the spread of deepfakes, last month saw the introduction of the Deepfakes accountability act in Congress by Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-NY), which would “defend each and every person from false appearances.”

While deepfakes began when it was used to place the faces of famous women onto the bodies of porn stars, the system has evolved to the point where it can put words in people’s mouths and bring back replicas of the deceased.

Back in May, it was reported that Samsung’s new approach to deepfakes allowed a model to be trained on just one still image, rather than requiring a large amount of source imagery.