Seagate breaks areal density barrier, offers 1TB per platter

By on May 3, 2011, 2:36 PM

Seagate today unveiled the world's first 3.5-inch hard drive featuring 1TB of storage capacity per disk platter. This isn't just a big deal for Seagate; breaking the 1TB areal density barrier is a big milestone for the whole hard drive industry.

The company has released the Seagate Barracuda XT 3TB Hard Drive (also be available in capacities of 2TB, 1.5TB, and 1TB). Seagate's GoFlex Desk products are the first to feature it, delivering storage capacities with an areal density of 625 Gigabits per square inch, the industry's highest. Seagate is on track to ship the 3TBs drive, featuring just three disk platters, to the distribution channel in the middle of this year.

If you feel like you're having a déjà vu, don't be alarmed: it is completely warranted. Two months ago, Seagate launched the Barracuda XT. It is the company's current offering and has five platters with an areal density of 488 Gigabits per square inch.

It would appear that today's announcement is regarding a refresh, though beyond the new areal density, Seagate is not sharing anything else. Other specifications likely won't change, though it would be nice to see if the price tag will get an update. Most likely it won't, but we won't know till the new version of the drive launches in a few months.

GoFlex Desk external drives, which can sit either vertically or horizontally, are compatible with both Windows and Mac computers. Each drive includes an NTFS driver for Mac, which allows the drive to store and access files from both Windows and Mac OS X computers without reformatting.

"Organizations of all sizes and consumers worldwide are amassing digital content at light speed, generating immense demand for storage of digital content of every imaginable kind," Rocky Pimentel, Seagate Executive Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Marketing, said in a statement. "We remain keenly focused on delivering the storage capacity, speed and manageability our customers need to thrive in an increasingly digital world."




User Comments: 10

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KG363 KG363 said:

Insanity!

Lokalaskurar Lokalaskurar said:

kg363 said:

Insanity!

Future.

HaMsTeYr HaMsTeYr said:

Still not a fan of Seagate anymore. Horrible build quality as of late... Too bad now that Samsung is under Seagate all I can hunt for is WD...

Mikymjr Mikymjr said:

Seagate should get better if they try. WD is still hands down better ;-)

fpsgamerJR62 said:

I guess this paves the way for 4 and 5 TB hard disks. I hope Seagate will also work on improving the reliability of their HDDs because it does go hand-in-hand with capacity and speed.

Guest said:

fpsgamerJR62

It does.

The more denser a platter becomes the faster a harddrive will become.

There will be more data per concentric circle. Therefore 1 revolution read/writes you more data.

PanicX PanicX, TechSpot Ambassador, said:

@hamsteyr & mikymjr

Asserting unsubstantiated opinions as facts, I'm sure you've got anecdotal evidence to back your claims as well.

R3DP3NGUIN R3DP3NGUIN said:

I have been lucky to not have any problems with seagate so far, but the WD green drives are the worst, nearly every week at my work we see one come in dead.

yRaz yRaz said:

r3dp3nguin said:

I have been lucky to not have any problems with seagate so far, but the WD green drives are the worst, nearly every week at my work we see one come in dead.

Funny, my brother just had a WD green drive die in his computer not to long ago. However, I have a 750gb caviar black, a 150gb raptor, and a 500gb seagate that only works %50 of the time. My raptor is coming up on 5 years old(my seagate is also that old) and has been a reliable, fast, drive for as long as I've had it. I haven't had the caviar black long enough to comment on its reliability, but I would still recommend it.

Back when IDE was still the choice method for connecting hard drives I had seagates go on my left and right. Heck, I had maxtors that lasted longer than my IDE seagates. Broke 3 overclocking the CPU bus, don't ask me how that works. I've heard the IDE bus and CPU bus were related somehow, never looked into it much. The other 4 I had started clicking after about 3 months. None of the ones that started clicking died on me because I replaced them almost as soon as it started. Every WD I've bought since then is still working aside from that one green drive.

oh the good 'ole days of computing when standards weren't always standard.

R3DP3NGUIN R3DP3NGUIN said:

yRaz said:

r3dp3nguin said:

I have been lucky to not have any problems with seagate so far, but the WD green drives are the worst, nearly every week at my work we see one come in dead.

Funny, my brother just had a WD green drive die in his computer not to long ago. However, I have a 750gb caviar black, a 150gb raptor, and a 500gb seagate that only works %50 of the time. My raptor is coming up on 5 years old(my seagate is also that old) and has been a reliable, fast, drive for as long as I've had it. I haven't had the caviar black long enough to comment on its reliability, but I would still recommend it.

Back when IDE was still the choice method for connecting hard drives I had seagates go on my left and right. Heck, I had maxtors that lasted longer than my IDE seagates. Broke 3 overclocking the CPU bus, don't ask me how that works. I've heard the IDE bus and CPU bus were related somehow, never looked into it much. The other 4 I had started clicking after about 3 months. None of the ones that started clicking died on me because I replaced them almost as soon as it started. Every WD I've bought since then is still working aside from that one green drive.

oh the good 'ole days of computing when standards weren't always standard.

Yea so far its only the WD greens i have experienced problems, I also own two WD VelociRaptors, which are nearly two years old and no problems. Same with black editions I havnt seen many problems with those. The seagate drives I use are only for backup purposes anyway, so there not running 24/7 in my servers.

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